uphill obstacles- root ledges and rocks, downed trees- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    36

    uphill obstacles- root ledges and rocks, downed trees

    There is one trail I've been riding more than any other. it's a beginner trail with some intermediate elements. One section I continue to struggle with is a gradual uphill climb with a tall tree root step up which continues uphill. I come off the bike every time I try. I know I'm attacking it wrong. I'm trying to power up with speed and roll over it. I sometimes make it up, sometimes not. Should something like that be approached by popping the front tire up and then pedal over it? I have not tried that yet. Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    53
    Depends how high the root is and how steep the trail is in that section, I'd say. What I tend to do on uphill ledges is look above the feature... like where I "want" to go, and then use a powerful and controlled approach to get over it. Also, if you are attempting that in your granny gear, try shifting up a few gears to give yourself some more torque. Keep your weight centered, pull up in a controlled manner on the bars, and use your push at just the right moment, and you should spring right over the root. now if it is a big ledge (1-2 feet) I find that slow and super controlled is best, but that is a different approach entirely.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    13,577
    Saddle stop to get your rear wheel back in contact with the trail after it goes over a root.



  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    36
    I should have given that detail. .. its around a foot tall root ledge/step up.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    53
    Yeah - 1 foot you can definitely muscle over that. I think the most important thing is going to be positioning on the bike and what gear you are in. Good luck, hope you nail it soon!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: brent701's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    2,424
    momentum is key
    Too Many .

  7. #7
    EAT MORE GRIME
    Reputation: 127.0.0.1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    5,432
    anyone you know who rides, that can ride it ?


    follow them one day, you'll figure it out fast


    and ...being super fit helps a ton. you need to build suds and maintain suds
    when climbing this crap

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    36
    Yes my husband and neighbors ride over it fine but they are usually ahead of me by that point. Lol. I will ask them to ride it while I watch and see how they do it.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: AllMountin''s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,103
    Spend some time off trail working on popping your front wheel up on small ledges, with a wheelie at first, and working into a manual later. Once you are confident in getting the front over consistently, the next part is a donkey kick. Lunge forward over the bars, weighting them with your arms, while removing weight from the pedals. Your forward momentum will carry the rear tire easily over the obstacle. Once you can do it consistently, start anticipating the second part of the move until it's one fluid maneuver. Then you'll be ready to conquer uphill step ups like a boss.

  10. #10
    755872
    Guest
    Wheelie and bunny hop practice for sure. I would also (as a rule) learn to climb with your body "floating" on the bike. Trying to keep too rigid on the bike (back and legs tight, kung-fu grip on the bars) is a recipe for slipping and losing traction. It's awesome that you're committed to mastering that obstacle though. Give it time and you'll get there.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    24,083
    If it's not a super steep climb, then to me you'd need to lift your front wheel up onto it and the lift/throw the rear up onto it, if you try to pedal the rear wheel up onto, more than likely you'll spin out the rear wheel and have to get off if your fitness and balance aren't up to snuff to briefly pause and regain traction, very similar to the You Tube video EB posted, only bigger moves. Check out the page below for some good tutorials, think you should find what you're looking for and probably a lot more that might also be useful.

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...n47nuq8x9tO_9j
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold
    You're doing mtbr wrong, you're supposed to get increasingly offended by the implications that you're doing ANYTHING wrong.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DethWshBkr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    2,426
    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Saddle stop to get your rear wheel back in contact with the trail after it goes over a root.



    Crap, with that kind of speed, you can climb up anything. I love how these "Skills" videos always are a pretty high speed section. That's easy.
    Rocks/roots/logs up hills that are lowest gear, been pedaling for at least 30 seconds (all speed has been bled off) are much harder!
    "Go soothingly in the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon"

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mattyice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    381
    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    anyone you know who rides, that can ride it ?


    follow them one day, you'll figure it out fast


    and ...being super fit helps a ton. you need to build suds and maintain suds
    when climbing this crap
    I love how a dude from MA is just like 'Yeah that's MTB, deal with it' not much of a primer over roots and rocks for us 'round here.

    For me, if you watched that saddle stop video, I feel the most important part of the whole maneuver is the lunge forward into that bars.

    Don't think of it as, pulling your body up. I like to think of my body occupying a line parallel with the grade and I pull and push my bike through and around stuff. So the hike up with the front would be done like a wheelie and I'd prefer to do it with gears or a quick weight shift back, then lunge the bike forward with pressure on the bars. then let the bike return underneath you to a (somewhat) neutral riding position. The more power you can put down the better. Clipless also help for a little sped hop in the rear as it were. With enough practice you'll learn to set your pedals before so you don't bash, and don't miss a stroke either.

    If you're coming at it gassed, try to slow down before it too. Don't worry about what the other guys are doing, do your own thing. Pace yourself, pedal easy coming up to it, catch your breath then give it hell.

    Don't be scared to session the hell out of it either. And tell your boys you want to hit it or tell them ahead of time you'd like some tips or pointers or that you want to session it. If they're not cool with that, they're not your riding buds.
    Banshee Bikes
    Slaphead Legion
    Wachusett Brewery

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    36
    I just watched a few of the videos. It was tremendously helpful. I would like to set up something in the woods behind my house with some smaller things to clear and practice a bunch.

  15. #15
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    6,442
    Quote Originally Posted by DethWshBkr View Post
    Crap, with that kind of speed, you can climb up anything. I love how these "Skills" videos always are a pretty high speed section. That's easy.
    Rocks/roots/logs up hills that are lowest gear, been pedaling for at least 30 seconds (all speed has been bled off) are much harder!
    Totally agree. Tech climbing at constant high speed only lasts so long. Once you redline the hp drops off, then it's finesse and skill. Ive found the secret to tech climbing, when hp is not the answer, is to go slow and use your balance, track standing slow, enough to catch your breath, then power up the tech then back right off again to recharge. Grippy tires with the correct psi make a big difference.

  16. #16
    Hoping for Endless Summer
    Reputation: OffTheTop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    230
    Do you have a decent enough fork?

    I know exactly what you're taking about. There is a fairly steep trail with a tree root maybe 6-10 inches tall and whenever I would hit it on my cheap hardtail, I would stop or fall to the side. You need to get your speed up and try to lift your front wheel slightly.

    Now I have a legit mountain bike. I still worry when I see that root, but my front tire rolls right over it and I lose only a tiny bit of momentum and can continue up the hill.

    (Also make sure you hit the root perpendicular. If you don't you might have problems. It's even worse in the rain!)

  17. #17
    I Tried Them ALL... SuperModerator
    Reputation: Cayenne_Pepa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    6,743
    Unlock the front shock(open) and let that front wheel gobble the root up and clear it effortlessly. Attack the transition of the slope, once it points upward. Don't just "hope" you can wallow over obstacles while climbing. It takes spinning a gear higher than normal: ie...."lighting the Afterburners."
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    24,083
    The honest key to UH tech climbing is mainly fitness and the ability to stall/balance to help recover between obstacles, if your fitness is seriously lacking and you can't stall your bike, even for a few seconds to catch your breath, you'll be in trouble.
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold
    You're doing mtbr wrong, you're supposed to get increasingly offended by the implications that you're doing ANYTHING wrong.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    13,577
    Other factors beside technique contribute to climbing over stuff.
    You have a DB Axis Comp 27.5 HT.
    Negatives are a heavy front end with a heavy fork, wheel, tire and tube if you're using one. You probably have 3+ extra pounds on the front. You notice this especially at low speeds.
    The 27.5 wheel makes it slightly more difficult to get the rear wheel up over things. 29 or 29+ rollover better and on long climbs the combo of the two negatives can add up. But fitness and technique will still get you up.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    982
    Try practicing weight transfer. At one foot you probably can power through it, but learn to finesse it and it'll be much smoother.
    As has been said, first pop the front up onto the ledge. Your weight will be toward back when you do this. As soon as the front is up though shift weight to the front. This unweights the rear. If you've got some momentum you probably can bash the rear over just by doing this, but work on actually getting the rear to loft by lunging the bike forward under you. Your weight needs to be forward to do this, your body weighs much more than bike so if your body is forward past the lip of the ledge, your center of gravity is also past the ledge and doing the lunge to pull the bike up and forward under you should bring it up past the ledge. Once the rear tire lands hopefully past the lip you pedal and keep riding through!
    You can try and get a feel for this lunging motion by first cruising slowly on flat ground, standing up on pedals off seat centered, and then push the bike forward under you. TO get the bike to move forward more, you have to start with your weight forward more. This is actually the motion racers use at the last moment at the finish line sprint to push bike forward to hopefully cut the finish line first, akin to foot racers thrusting their chest forward.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    36
    Ive taken a lot of advice posted and watched some videos and of course practiced the past week or so. I got up the obstacle today! Now two more on this trail... a downhill rock garden and a large cedar tree to get over. My goal is to finish this trail without walking those sections... eventually!

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    36
    I did buy a new bike. I don't know if I felt more confident... but it certainly felt smoother on the trail. Giant/Liv tempt 3. I like the female specific frame. Much better..

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by mattyice View Post
    I love how a dude from MA is just like 'Yeah that's MTB, deal with it' not much of a primer over roots and rocks for us 'round here.

    For me, if you watched that saddle stop video, I feel the most important part of the whole maneuver is the lunge forward into that bars.

    Don't think of it as, pulling your body up. I like to think of my body occupying a line parallel with the grade and I pull and push my bike through and around stuff. So the hike up with the front would be done like a wheelie and I'd prefer to do it with gears or a quick weight shift back, then lunge the bike forward with pressure on the bars. then let the bike return underneath you to a (somewhat) neutral riding position. The more power you can put down the better. Clipless also help for a little sped hop in the rear as it were. With enough practice you'll learn to set your pedals before so you don't bash, and don't miss a stroke either.

    If you're coming at it gassed, try to slow down before it too. Don't worry about what the other guys are doing, do your own thing. Pace yourself, pedal easy coming up to it, catch your breath then give it hell.

    Don't be scared to session the hell out of it either. And tell your boys you want to hit it or tell them ahead of time you'd like some tips or pointers or that you want to session it. If they're not cool with that, they're not your riding buds.
    I did that today. I rode slowly up and instead of walking it again I took my time and came back around. Found a better line and made it up no problem.

  24. #24
    I have Flat Pedal shame.
    Reputation: Thustlewhumber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    855
    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Saddle stop to get your rear wheel back in contact with the trail after it goes over a root.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAIoI0ito9c
    Ahhh the ol "saddle stop" or aka "jam the seat into your a-hole and call it mtn biking".


    this is a better example:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crnqZ-DtyPs

    Basically, you want your chest as low as possible (think puppy paws or t-rex claws on your handlebars) and then be prepared to shift to a very low standing position as the terrain get steeper. Practice actually placing your chest on the bars so that you can see what your limit is. If you are breaking traction, or if the front wheel is lifting you are not far enough forward (think about getting your belly button in front of the handlebars). As always, maintain steady pressure while you are pedaling.
    Life is easy. Figure out the price of whatever it is you want, then pay that price.

Similar Threads

  1. Tips for riding over obstacles/up ledges
    By MHCBH in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-18-2016, 01:53 AM
  2. Downed trees removed on the Hive.
    By akr2 in forum Alaska
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-19-2015, 09:11 AM
  3. Downed Trees = Ranger Danger
    By GrapeSmuggler in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-12-2014, 12:21 PM
  4. How to turn downed trees into obstacles?
    By MotoX33 in forum Trail Building and Advocacy
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-06-2012, 08:44 AM
  5. Richmond Hill downed trees
    By Mike Brown in forum North & South Carolina
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-15-2011, 05:50 AM

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.