Unprepared group- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 66 of 66
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: velo99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    420

    Unprepared group

    Ran across 4 riders today that weren't prepared. One of their group blew a tube and he had no tube, patch or pump. Neither did any of the rest of the group. One guy kept bragging about how he went tubeless. Wasn't helping the other guy one bit. They didn't know how to take off the wheel and remove the tire. Unfortunately I didn't have the right size tube to get him going and had to leave him with his peeps. At least he wasn't alone but they were a couple of miles from the nearest trailhead. Practice taking off the wheel.and tire. It'll be worth it when you're on the trail. One day you will need that particular bit of knowledge.
    Reminds me why I carry the gear I have in my backpack.
    Advice to you noobs. Always carry a tube and an inflation device. Always carry a minimal tool set and a quick link for your chain. Did I say always?
    One day you'll thank me.
    Last edited by velo99; 03-13-2015 at 04:44 AM.
    The bike doesn't make you go fast.
    You make the bike go fast.

  2. #2
    B42
    B42 is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: B42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    174
    I'm starting to not be surprised by these stories...
    ## Every time I cheat death it reinforces the adolescent belief that I'm invincible. ##

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bigflamingtaco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    297
    Carrying a quick link will only help if your quick link fails. If the chain fails anywhere else, you are going to need a pin extractor tool. Always carry a pin extractor tool AND a quicklink or replacement pin.

    Always carry a spare tube and inflator regardless of whether you are tubed or not. Tubeless braggarts shut up real quick when they get hit with a large puncture that can't be sealed and they have to hump it back to the trailhead.

    Your Multitool should be able to adjust everything except axles, freehub, bottom bracket and cable length. Bonus if it can.

    More water than you think you need.

    More food than you think you need.

    More battery charge than you think you need.

    Remember, you never know when you are going to come across someone that had a spill and can use some of what you've got.

    Ride hard, ride safe.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    12,937
    Quote Originally Posted by velo99 View Post
    Unfortunately I didn't have the right size tube to get him going and had to leave him with his peeps..
    A 26x2.1-2.5 will work fine for any size including a 29. Just inflate a little to stretch it before you install.
    That's a good size to carry.
    A couple miles of walking is a useful learning experience.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: velo99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    420
    EB
    The gear I carry is for my bike. If I can help someone out with it, so be it. If not, as you said, a hike out is a great teacher.
    The bike doesn't make you go fast.
    You make the bike go fast.

  6. #6
    My little friends
    Reputation: EABiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    606
    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    A 26x2.1-2.5 will work fine for any size including a 29. Just inflate a little to stretch it before you install.
    That's a good size to carry.
    A couple miles of walking is a useful learning experience.

    If you want to really be universal, carry a presta tube with a schrader grommet!

  7. #7
    Super Moderator SuperModerator
    Reputation: AVL-MTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,082
    I've got over 50 pathes in my backpack. Maybe I'll help someone some day.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,285
    crankbros multi-tool, patch kit, first aid kit, chapstick, and water.

    sometimes, beer

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,781
    ACE bandage is another good thing to carry. It's good if you break your wrist (like I have) or get a sprain or something while riding BUT the other benefit of ACE bandage is that if you tear your sidewall, you can wrap a tube in the area of the tear so that it doesn't bulge out of the tire and pop. It's versatile, cheap and light.
    Killing it with close inspection.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator SuperModerator
    Reputation: AVL-MTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,082
    Quote Originally Posted by FireLikeIYA View Post
    ACE bandage is another good thing to carry. It's good if you break your wrist (like I have) or get a sprain or something while riding BUT the other benefit of ACE bandage is that if you tear your sidewall, you can wrap a tube in the area of the tear so that it doesn't bulge out of the tire and pop. It's cheap and light.
    Drinking and riding? Isn't that against the law?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    12,679
    As long as they were having fun and not whining it's all good. Walking a few miles is no big deal, actually pleasant IMO and gives the rider ample opportunity to reflect on how they may or may not alter their pre-ride preparations next time.

  12. #12
    B.Ike
    Reputation: ElwoodT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,176
    a 29er tube will get you home on your 26er. not ideal but it will work. I'm not sure I would of bailed them out with my extra tube. 2 miles is not far to walk and there are lessons to be learned.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,072
    The good thing is they were a group. I've come across people out on the trails alone with various issues and crashes. People knowing very little about their bikes doesn't surprise me anymore, though. Even the very basics, like properly operating a quick release, are a completely foreign concept to a new rider if they've not been shown any different.

    I teach basic maintenance classes through the shop I work for and always encourage new riders to attend when they buy the bike. Part of that class includes how to repair flats and items to take with you on rides. I usually have my hydrapak and road saddle bags on hand for show and tell.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Legbacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,564
    My group is pretty well prepared and we need to be. One of my friends had 4 flats in 1 ride. Pinch flats. He has high pressure but rides hard. We all carry tubes & tools. Be prepared or be prepared to walk.
    Formerly Travis Bickle

    Team Robot. "modulation is code for “I suck at brake control.” Here’s a free tip: get better."

  15. #15
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,320
    Go to your LBS, and take owens crash course. Counting on the kindness of others doesn't always work.
    If a midweek ride, and it gets dark, a cold night spent bumbling around in the woods is a pretty strong teacher.

  16. #16
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    27,506
    I learned a ton on a 6 mile hike in North Carolina back when I was a noob.

    For tire repair, I carry a pump, spare tubes (I have a skinny 26er tube and a fat tube - I just keep them both in my pack since I have bikes that use both), patch kit, tire boot. I also have a tool roll with a couple different multitools in it, some zip ties, quick link, and some other misc repair bits.

    I honestly don't use that stuff much. What gets used most on other riders is my first aid kit. Can't tell you how many times other riders have been blown away by the fact that I carry a first aid kit. *facepalm

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sleepyguy1001's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    205
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I learned a ton on a 6 mile hike in North Carolina back when I was a noob.

    For tire repair, I carry a pump, spare tubes (I have a skinny 26er tube and a fat tube - I just keep them both in my pack since I have bikes that use both), patch kit, tire boot. I also have a tool roll with a couple different multitools in it, some zip ties, quick link, and some other misc repair bits.

    I honestly don't use that stuff much. What gets used most on other riders is my first aid kit. Can't tell you how many times other riders have been blown away by the fact that I carry a first aid kit. *facepalm
    What do you carry for a first aid kit? I tossed a roll of tape, a couple of gauze pads in my pack, after I took a couple of diggers. I carry benadryl because I have a localized problem with bee stings. Reading your post got me to wondering what else would be handy. Thanks.....
    We have met the enemy, and it is us. Pogo

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    69
    "As long as they were having fun and not whining it's all good. Walking a few miles is no big deal, actually pleasant IMO and gives the rider ample opportunity to reflect on how they may or may not alter their pre-ride preparations next time."

    I too a long time ago learned the lessons of being prepared the hard way. I bought a pump when I got stuck midway on a rail trail, and realized fixing a tube doesn't help if you can't put air in it (duh!). I bought a chain tool and quick links after I had to walk 3 miles back to the trail head because I snapped the chain. I carry extra tubes after I got two consecutive flats because the tube failed where the valve stem meets the tube. I guess that is the "it can't happen to me" until it happens to you, and thus a lesson learned.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    9,804
    Thank God for natural selection.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    8,246
    I've got a ton of stuff that just lives in my pack; I don't bother tailoring the assortment to the ride, I just grab the pack, top off the water and go. Besides most of the stuff mentioned already, I've also got a singleator, a few derailleur hangers and a shock pump.
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  21. #21
    A wheelist
    Reputation: Mike T.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,991
    Sidewall tear patching material (tire boot) - I used it 2x on one ride when others both ripped tire sidewalls. Saved the whole ride so it did! I've used it another 2x to help other people too.

  22. #22
    Broken Hipster
    Reputation: Barman1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    821
    Beginners Corner?
    I'll meet my group of seasoned riders and we've got like 2 hours to clear a 3 hour trail ride and we spend a half hour fixing flats and adjusting sh!t at the trailhead right after unloading.

    There goes my ride.

    And people wonder why I prefer to ride alone...

  23. #23
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    27,506
    Quote Originally Posted by sleepyguy1001 View Post
    What do you carry for a first aid kit? I tossed a roll of tape, a couple of gauze pads in my pack, after I took a couple of diggers. I carry benadryl because I have a localized problem with bee stings. Reading your post got me to wondering what else would be handy. Thanks.....
    I definitely go through gauze the most out of anything in my kit. I usually don't wrap it, but having a couple different tape/wrap options covers any eventualities if the injured person can't use their hands to keep pressure on a wound or you just want to use the gauze to cover a wound that's no longer bleeding while the person hikes/rides out. I keep some benadryl for bee stings, too. I wouldn't say that I have a particular problem with them, but it does lessen the swelling and pain from them when they happen, even for nonallergic folks. I have a Tick Key, also, and something to keep any suspect ticks in. I have also found keeping an empty ziploc baggie or two to be important after you're finished cleaning someone up. Contains any bloody garbage. nitrile gloves in case you're helping someone unknown bleeding all over (blood-born pathogen concerns, you know). Also some imodium and some tylenol. I need to replace my triangle bandage (good for slings, making splints, etc) because I gave it to a dude with a dislocated shoulder last summer. Moleskin is something I go through often enough, too. Helps when you've got a long hike-a-bike in stiff bike shoes...or you encounter someone on a long hike-a-bike wearing stiff bike shoes.

    I probably also ought to get a refresher course on CPR/First Aid certification. It's been awhile and there are probably better methods. I KNOW that the recommended CPR methods are different than when I was last certified.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    8,246
    Quote Originally Posted by Barman1 View Post
    Beginners Corner?
    I'll meet my group of seasoned riders and we've got like 2 hours to clear a 3 hour trail ride and we spend a half hour fixing flats and adjusting sh!t at the trailhead right after unloading.

    There goes my ride.

    And people wonder why I prefer to ride alone...
    hehehe...I'm with ya - there've been times we never even made it out of the lot...
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    914
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T. View Post
    Sidewall tear patching material (tire boot) - I used it 2x on one ride when others both ripped tire sidewalls. Saved the whole ride so it did! I've used it another 2x to help other people too.
    Folded up dollar bill works good as a tire boot too. Actually works better than the park tools boot cuz it's more flexible and stays in place easier

  26. #26
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,320
    Quote Originally Posted by pwu_1 View Post
    Folded up dollar bill works good as a tire boot too. Actually works better than the park tools boot cuz it's more flexible and stays in place easier
    IME - Only if it's a small tear.
    When a sidewall rip gets big a tire boot will keep the tube from sticking out and scratching every rock on the trail.



    These are made out from old tire sidewalls, and the plastic packaging at home depot.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    12,937
    I used some Polysporin multi-antibiotic gel when a friend got a gash next on his thumb web- with a wrap of perforated surgical tape. It was a clean cut on a rock. We had the gel and tape on within a minute. It acts as a pain killer too. It works uncovered for scratches.

  28. #28
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    27,506
    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    I used some Polysporin multi-antibiotic gel when a friend got a gash next on his thumb web- with a wrap of perforated surgical tape. It was a clean cut on a rock. We had the gel and tape on within a minute. It acts as a pain killer too. It works uncovered for scratches.
    Oh yeah. Forgot that my kit also has triple antibiotic and some antiseptic wipes.

  29. #29
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    10,729
    The last time I had to walk out of the woods, it was because I broke my frame.
    I like turtles

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    37
    As a newbie I need all of the above. Any good brands/models for multi tool, etc.

  31. #31
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,320
    Alot of stuff here is helpful, but probably too much for a noob.
    If nothing else re-read post #13 and get to your LBS to learn how to change a flat.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    624
    One of my proudest moments riding was when I finally got a multi-tool with a chainbreaker (partially from watching people be told to here, I'd never broken a chain) and a friend broke his chain on the first non-solo ride I had it in my bag. Out came my tool -which I feigned confidence in using - and with no trouble I took out the troubled link (along with one other so it matched), put the chain back together and we were on our way with him slightly short chained.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    197
    Coming from a mostly road biking background, I never considered a chain breaker, since road bikes don't break well maintained chains.

    First ride on my new mountain bike, put down a lot of torque on a steep section (wrong gear), and pop! I suspect the previous owner reused or improperly installed the pin. Fortunately, another person in the group had a chain breaker and quick link.

    Now I have a dedicated MTB kit with larger multitool and spare links.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,072
    I also always carry a small first aid kit in my pack. It was originally a pre-packaged kit in a thicker plastic zip-loc style pouch. I removed a few things and added some things to it. I primarily keep different sized bandages and gauze, triple antibiotic cream, antiseptic wipes, moleskin, small tweezers in a plastic tube that can be helpful for ticks or pulling debris out of tires, nitrile gloves, etc... It's come in handy quite a few times.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    17
    If they didn't have a tube, why were they trying to take off the wheel / tire in the first place? If they truly didn't know how to remove the wheel / tire (which is hard to believe) then they were probably all extreme noobs and were out enjoying themselves. The world doesn't end if you get a flat and have to hike a bike back to the car.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FriscoFairlane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by velo99 View Post
    They didn't know how to take off the wheel and remove the tire.
    If you can't take off your wheel or change a tube, you shouldn't be on the trail at all.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FriscoFairlane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by owensjs View Post
    I also always carry a small first aid kit in my pack.
    That's one thing I need to add to my bag, especially since I frequently ride alone. I have thought of adding clot packs too just in case I get gored or otherwise cut badly.

  38. #38
    MattyK
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    21
    It's good trail karma to help people out. I'm sure we've all been stuck at least once.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    47
    I typically just leave everything in my pack and replace it as its used. Right now I have:

    For the bike:
    tube
    tire levers
    multi tool with chain breaker
    quicklink and 3 links of chain
    2 derailleur hangers
    co2
    hand pump
    shock pump
    Zip ties
    Bottle of stans

    For me:
    Gauze
    bandaids
    athletic tape
    nasa blanket
    chlorine tabs
    matches

    The last three items might not be necessary, but I ride a good amount in remote areas and almost had to spend a night in sub freezing temps, so I always carry them as cheap insurance.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    234
    i find that the only time i need my tools on the trail is when i don't pack them…. so i try and remember to pack em every time.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    282
    guilty as charge on the chain. I wasn't carrying a master/missing link or a chain tool. But i know this and i'm prepped to hike/walk out if i have too. I broke a chain just 10 days ago with 2 friends. We just started our ride, one guy did have a break tool and got me going again. I do carry both now. Always carry tubes and pumps... I've had to replace tubes on my road bike. Anything can happen though, so you should always be prepared to take the walk/hike out.

  42. #42
    DFL
    Reputation: askibum02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,391
    I've honestly never been unprepared on the trail, Cub Scouts taught me right. I ride with my kids, my son and I on a 29er and my daughter on a 26". My son and I run tubeless but I carry three 29er tubes anyway. I carry two 26" tubes plus a couple patch kits, a multi-tool with chain breaker, three quick links, two 24g CO2 canisters, a mini pump, and an air gauge. About the only thing I don't carry is extra dérailleur hangers and a first aid kit, which I probably should.
    I wouldn't **** you, you're my favorite turd.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    8,246
    Quote Originally Posted by gzank6 View Post
    always be prepared to take the walk/hike out.
    Depending on the terrain, if it's fairly smooth, you can often make better time lowering the seat a bit and scooting with your feet when you're caught chainless. Works not bad on the flats, and of course the descents. Once I rode a full weekend of DH without a chain (and I've done the last few runs of the day that way a bunch of times). You can really pick up a lot about how to pump, conserve momentum, and stay off the brakes.
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  44. #44
    Super Moderator SuperModerator
    Reputation: AVL-MTB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,082
    Well, this thread made it to facebook, which now has more replies than the thread alone
    -_-

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ABRAKEGABRA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    18
    What really?! HAHAHA


  46. #46
    Reluctant Tree Hugger
    Reputation: Saladin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    570
    Quote Originally Posted by AshevilleMtBiker View Post
    Well, this thread made it to facebook, which now has more replies than the thread alone
    -_-
    That's how I came across it.

    I'm guilty of not having tubes, first aid, derailleur hangers, or chain repair stuff. I'm prepared to walk if I have to. I do have a flashlight and back up battery for my phone if I have to GPS it through the woods at night. But it would be better of me to get those things and not have to do all that.
    Live like there's no tomorrow. But pay your bills just in case there is.

  47. #47
    fRIDEday makes me happy!
    Reputation: FullBladdy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    902
    Derailleur cable, clipless cleat and screws, spf lip balm, plastic garbage bag stuffed in the bottom of my camelbak, extra food, t.p.(better yet 2 baby wipes), whistle, mini flashlight and most of the other stuff listed above. Chain breaker will be on every ride.

    I of course plan to bring everything that can keep the ride going but also know that the long hike out with a technical is made smoother with a few well thought goodies.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    109
    I blew out a rear tube 4 miles from the trailhead without a spare tube back in 2011, so I've learned my lesson. Walking a bike 4 miles is not fun. Now, I always take a large North Face backpack on my trail rides. I always pack extra tubes, necessary tools and even odd things like benadryl in case I get stung by a bee or a wasp.

  49. #49
    Evolutionsverlierer
    Reputation: acer66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    919
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    As long as they were having fun and not whining it's all good. Walking a few miles is no big deal, actually pleasant IMO and gives the rider ample opportunity to reflect on how they may or may not alter their pre-ride preparations next time.
    This, all in the attitude and even the most seasoned rider can forget something.

    On a ride one of the guys who rides for ages all types of different bike, traveled the world on a budget, very self reliant guy in general took his brand new bike out,
    gets a flat in the rear only to discover that the rear axle uses no quick release but required a big allen key.
    Fortunately one and only one mini tool among the other riders had that.

    I myself had to walk my bike back a couple of miles because I discovered after getting a flat that my pump broke at some unknown point to me in my back pack.
    Besides some initial cussing there was some "singing" and reflecting waddling back to the car.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    50
    The situation presents itself on Mt biking rides and road bike rides now and then. I generally like being of assistance when I can. But if I'm going to spend time with somebody, with possible donation of consumables, you can be assured the lecture's coming. LOL.

    I play it by ear. Tough Love approach isn't exactly the worst thing. As has been said here before, paying the price for lack of preparedness is a wonderful life lesson. So I'm not going to feel guilty if I roll past somebody from time to time. Much depends on my mood, remaining sunlight, after ride activities, etc. And I'll be honest, I'm a little more apt to help out a newbie who doesn't know any better than I am for a Pro, who knows better and made a conscious decision to ride light, expecting somebody else to cover their ass. The minute I get the sense, that I'm being taken advantage of, see ya!

    I'm not fond of giving away costly consumables to somebody I'll never see again though.

  51. #51
    VENI VEDI BIKI
    Reputation: skankingbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    838
    Last year I inadvertently forgot my chain tool on a rail-trail training ride and, guess what, I busted my chain and had to walk 8 miles back to the trail head in spds......never again will I not pack a chain tool.

    Re: providing assistance, I generally will provide a tube if one is needed, as I have been in the other position as well. Karma seems to work when mountain biking.
    Veni Vidi Biki

    I came, I saw, I biked.

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    594
    We have a guy in our group (over 40 and a lawyer no less) who does jack sh!t bike maintenance himself and is constantly unprepared. Shows up late to the start of the ride, always needs to pump up and adjust stuff delaying us even more. Tends to have weird mechanicals that are unusual due to lack of simple maintenance or bike checks, such as the time his brake caliper fell off as he hadn't torqued or locktited the adaptor bolts.

    We've taken to leaving him to walk out or at most talking him through repairs but not doing them for him. People like this have to learn or get left behind as it's lazy not to be able to help yourself.

    First tube loan is a freebie, the second time you get a flat with no spare we leave you to walk out. Eventually goodwill runs out. Be prepared.

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    282
    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Depending on the terrain, if it's fairly smooth, you can often make better time lowering the seat a bit and scooting with your feet when you're caught chainless. Works not bad on the flats, and of course the descents. Once I rode a full weekend of DH without a chain (and I've done the last few runs of the day that way a bunch of times). You can really pick up a lot about how to pump, conserve momentum, and stay off the brakes.
    true... i did scoot a bit when i had that broken chain. and when i broke a derailleur on my road bike once... i did that for a good 5 miles to get home.

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    5,435
    Quote Originally Posted by bigflamingtaco View Post
    Carrying a quick link will only help if your quick link fails. If the chain fails anywhere else, you are going to need a pin extractor tool. Always carry a pin extractor tool AND a quicklink or replacement pin.

    Always carry a spare tube and inflator regardless of whether you are tubed or not. Tubeless braggarts shut up real quick when they get hit with a large puncture that can't be sealed and they have to hump it back to the trailhead.

    Your Multitool should be able to adjust everything except axles, freehub, bottom bracket and cable length. Bonus if it can.

    More water than you think you need.

    More food than you think you need.

    More battery charge than you think you need.

    Remember, you never know when you are going to come across someone that had a spill and can use some of what you've got.

    Ride hard, ride safe.
    What ? Quick links can be put everywhere. I'm talking sram chains here. Chain breaks. Use chain tool to get to 2 inner plate connectors. Put in quick link. Continue to pedal. Am I missing something?

  55. #55
    My other ride is your mom
    Reputation: Maadjurguer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5,384
    To the OP...why did you not show them to use an improper size tube to fix their problem? 26-->29'r....stretch that $h!t....29'r-->26'r....stuff that $h!t.




  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    119
    I always road very light. I think it depends how far out you are. In high school I used to ride 20+ miles a day when I could and back in the mid 90's we seemed to get pinch flats a ton more than now. I would carry a C02 Cartridge with adaptor, two tire levers, Scabs patches and two allen wrench sizes (the two most common used) in a little bag you could hardly see under the seat, or in a backpack. I'm always amazed by how much gear some people carry like they will need to do an entire bike rebuild on the side of the road. I have never had to replace a chain on the side of the road. Maybe that's just me, but I road every day, everywhere, and have ridden since the mid 90's. I didn't even start driving till I was 17 I road so much. Once I used a bunch of stickers I found in quarter vending machine to patch a tube, it held till I got home, and I replaced it. Sometimes you need to be creative.

  57. #57
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,320
    In a world filled with Rhodes scholars who says that he who road more takes the rode less traveled.

    Pardon my creative confusion. These needle teeth are tingly, and want to chomp your tires.

    ...sent by dixie cup/string
    Last edited by Flyin_W; 03-19-2015 at 08:02 PM.

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    8,246
    Quote Originally Posted by VideoboyMatt View Post
    I always road very light. I think it depends how far out you are. In high school I used to ride 20+ miles a day when I could and back in the mid 90's we seemed to get pinch flats a ton more than now. I would carry a C02 Cartridge with adaptor, two tire levers, Scabs patches and two allen wrench sizes (the two most common used) in a little bag you could hardly see under the seat, or in a backpack. I'm always amazed by how much gear some people carry like they will need to do an entire bike rebuild on the side of the road. I have never had to replace a chain on the side of the road. Maybe that's just me, but I road every day, everywhere, and have ridden since the mid 90's. I didn't even start driving till I was 17 I road so much. Once I used a bunch of stickers I found in quarter vending machine to patch a tube, it held till I got home, and I replaced it. Sometimes you need to be creative.
    Road riding is a whole lot different than trail riding. I've fixed chains at least 100 times and gotta have taken care of 1000+ flats easily (not always just mine, but also people I'm with or strangers) - one of the reasons I always carry some sort of pump rather than CO2 cartridges. Done 30 or 40 trailside SS conversions, replaced dozens of derailleur hangers, used bailing wire to make a fixie when I torched my hub, had the right bolt to replace one that rattled out or snapped regularly...there's nothing in my pack that I don't find I've used, and might need to use next time out IME.
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  59. #59
    Silence! I kill you!
    Reputation: Jorgemonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    3,049
    I was on a road ride last year. About 15mi from home my tire sidewall blew. I had a spare tube but no spare tire. Right after I called my wife and asked her to come get, some dude on a semi beater bike rolls up and asks if I needed any help. I told him what happened, and he opened up his bags. FILLED with spare tubes and components for various types of bikes.

    The guy guy me a hard sliver of an old tire to put under my old one. Worked like a charm. Some people are prepared, others are not, and some have moving bike shops on wheels.
    My photography website:
    Scott Mosher Photography

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    12,679
    Quote Originally Posted by Jorgemonkey View Post
    I was on a road ride last year. About 15mi from home my tire sidewall blew. I had a spare tube but no spare tire. Right after I called my wife and asked her to come get, some dude on a semi beater bike rolls up and asks if I needed any help. I told him what happened, and he opened up his bags. FILLED with spare tubes and components for various types of bikes.

    The guy guy me a hard sliver of an old tire to put under my old one. Worked like a charm. Some people are prepared, others are not, and some have moving bike shops on wheels.

    See, guys like that live to save the day for unprepared riders like you. If not for your slovenly ways his life would have no meaning.

  61. #61
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: Impetus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,464
    oddly, I don't think I've ever met an unprepared group. I've run across many people/groups wrenching trail side, but when I stop to make sure they have all they need, the answer is always 'yes' and someone holds up a handful of tools wrapped in dirty fingers.
    That said, I'm a sucker. In addition to a multi-tool, zip ties, tape, a first aid kit and a knife, I still carry:
    9spd quick links and a few chain links, plus 10spd links and chain- but have a 10spd drivetrain
    patches, milkjug boot, 3 levers, a pump and CO2 inflator, and TWO tubes, even though I'm setup tubeless.
    A shifter cable AND a brake cable, even though no one I know has mechanical brakes, and sometimes we ride Singlespeed.
    Several clif bars, and never less than 2L of water at the start of a ride.
    A cheap pair of clear safety glasses in case a crash breaks some ones sunglasses, or it gets dark and I need clear eye-pro.
    I also of course have a cellphone, and a $20.

    My pack is a heavy beast, but it beats walking or leaving another rider behind.

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    282
    And sometimes luck is your best friend. Many years ago a buddy and I on a whim decide to ride to Mexico about 150 miles down the coast. Cranking up a steep hill in San clemente my pedal falls to pieces... we pull over... to gather our thoughts. .. keep in mind we were fresh out of high school... had no spares no tools. About 100 bucks we were saving for beer in Mexico. .. shrugging our shoulders as we looked at the pedal. .. we look around and right there is a bike shop. Ends up being the only mishap the whole trip. Man what a trip it was.

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by Jorgemonkey View Post
    I was on a road ride last year. About 15mi from home my tire sidewall blew. I had a spare tube but no spare tire. .
    Sorry, no Mt biking content:

    I had a two week stretch where I approached Comedy with my numerous road riding tire mishaps. Got to the point where I was actually looking for hidden cameras, it was that bad.

    In one instance, while trying to change out a tube, I ruined not one but the second spare tube too. One went from damaging the stem, the other from a poor job of removing grit.. I ran out of CO2 chargers on that one. I also blew out a sidewall that no "dollar bill trick" could possibly fix.
    The end result is I'm packing ridiculously heavy. I bought a manual pump for the frame. I carry an abundance of CO2 chargers. 3 tubes. Patch Kit. And I even carry a spare tire now. (I bought a light foldable tire and never unwrapped it). I love the idea of a trimmed section of tire though...

    If you carry AAA (and your cellphone), be aware that they have a Bicycle Service if you ever break down on the road. Keep the number handy.

  64. #64
    Silence! I kill you!
    Reputation: Jorgemonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    3,049
    Quote Originally Posted by EddieZ View Post
    Sorry, no Mt biking content:

    I had a two week stretch where I approached Comedy with my numerous road riding tire mishaps. Got to the point where I was actually looking for hidden cameras, it was that bad.

    In one instance, while trying to change out a tube, I ruined not one but the second spare tube too. One went from damaging the stem, the other from a poor job of removing grit.. I ran out of CO2 chargers on that one. I also blew out a sidewall that no "dollar bill trick" could possibly fix.
    The end result is I'm packing ridiculously heavy. I bought a manual pump for the frame. I carry an abundance of CO2 chargers. 3 tubes. Patch Kit. And I even carry a spare tire now. (I bought a light foldable tire and never unwrapped it). I love the idea of a trimmed section of tire though...

    If you carry AAA (and your cellphone), be aware that they have a Bicycle Service if you ever break down on the road. Keep the number handy.
    Here is my MTB content. I once had a wheel give me problems. I'd pump it up, go riding, come home, goto sleep, wake up to a flat tire. Take out tube, inflate, put under water, no leaks. Pump back up in the morning, let sit all day. At night its still inflated. Wake up in the morning, tire is flat. Change tubes, pump up in the morning, stays inflated all day, wake up and its flat. Changed tire + tube, same thing. Went riding for a big ride, stayed inflated.

    Finally changed wheels and it stopped. When that wheel broke a spoke I went to the original wheel + tubes/tires. From that point on it stayed inflated. And nobody lived with me at that point.
    My photography website:
    Scott Mosher Photography

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Road riding is a whole lot different than trail riding. I've fixed chains at least 100 times and gotta have taken care of 1000+ flats easily (not always just mine, but also people I'm with or strangers) - one of the reasons I always carry some sort of pump rather than CO2 cartridges. Done 30 or 40 trailside SS conversions, replaced dozens of derailleur hangers, used bailing wire to make a fixie when I torched my hub, had the right bolt to replace one that rattled out or snapped regularly...there's nothing in my pack that I don't find I've used, and might need to use next time out IME.
    It wasn't always road riding. I have done lots of trail and mountain riding, as well as XC Racing. I still have never had my chain break. I guess I've been lucky. I still feel for my use CO2 is the best as I am generally not fixing everyones bikes, just mine. I have broken crank arms, and blown forks, but no amount of gear in my backpack is going to fix that on the trail. As I said, I like to travel light. Yes I am prepared for the most common issues, but I don't feel the need to carry 10 lbs of stuff with me everywhere I go.

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SeaBass_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,109
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    What ? Quick links can be put everywhere. I'm talking sram chains here. Chain breaks. Use chain tool to get to 2 inner plate connectors. Put in quick link. Continue to pedal. Am I missing something?
    No, you got that covered.

    Signed,
    SRAM Chain Using Tubeless Braggart.

Similar Threads

  1. new to group.
    By treeleaf26 in forum Pennsylvania
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 01-24-2015, 09:24 AM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-30-2013, 08:34 AM
  3. XX1 Group?
    By Pelly_NH in forum Where are the Best Deals?
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 06-03-2013, 12:38 PM
  4. New to the group
    By Rlosefsky in forum Arizona
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-30-2013, 08:49 AM
  5. look for a group
    By dhxc in forum Southeast/Midsouth - GA, TN, AL, FL, MS, LA, AR
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-27-2011, 06:06 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.