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  1. #1
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    Which type of bike to get for this kind of riding?

    I like to ride my bike down the street and then take it off-road in muddy fields and then downtown mainstreet in my town and jump it off the sidewalk and ride it down some stairs, then through the woods on some dirt trail hills with rocks and roots everywhere.

    I used to have an Ibex Alpine and thought it was a great bike. I got rid of that a couple years ago and have just started looking into getting a new bike and am finding all this info on all these different types of bikes you need for all the different types of riding.

    Which type of mountain bike should I get for the type of riding I described above? I'm not asking for brand and model (yet)... just need to know the type so I can start looking at which brand/model.

    Thanks in advance for any help.

  2. #2
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    All Mountain

    This might also help: http://forums.mtbr.com/beginners-cor...de-811009.html

  3. #3
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    Thank you!

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    light XC bike. Just go easy on the stairs. No piont to lug a 40lb AM bike for light riding that like that

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob13bob View Post
    light XC bike. Just go easy on the stairs. No piont to lug a 40lb AM bike for light riding that like that
    I second this. Nothing you described sounds like you need an all mountain bike unless you're planning on jumping the thing off 10 steps at a time. You don't need the slack geometry, you don't need the weight, you don't need 5 inches of suspension travel.

    A ~100mm XC bike would likely do the trick, hard tail or full suspension. Look for one with lockout for the pavement.

  6. #6
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    Sorry, this is why I hate the term All Mountain. I was referring to a 30lb, hard tail with 120+mm of fork.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    Sorry, this is why I hate the term All Mountain. I was referring to a 30lb, hard tail with 120+mm of fork.
    Yeah, the naming scheme is rather ambiguous. ^That I can get behind.

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  9. #9
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    imo, if you want to do things like riding stairs n hitting the woods, dont by a xc bike you will be limited by down the track..
    once you start riding stairs etc you will want to start jumping stairs n pushing yourself down the track..
    I would get as much of a bike as you can get..
    I have a Giant reign all mountain bike, i can hit anything on it and am rarely ever limited by my bike
    I own a STP that i used to love stair jumping n riding on and i wanted a do everything bike so i bought a reign n love what it enables me to do.
    If you get a XC bike like some have suggested you will be limited by it down the track if you want to push yourself n take on new challenges..
    IMO i would get something that your skills can progress with the bike and you can realy have some for with, cheers n good luck...
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  10. #10
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    Full Suspension XC bike would do for the conditions you describe and even be comfortable to ride for longer periods of time.

  11. #11
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    Here's where it starts to get confusing to me... the different bike types and how to identify them.

    All Mountain... when I go to a manufacturer's site, it doesn't always say "this is the All Mountain" model... Is AM the same as "Full Suspension"? If so, then it also lists "Full Suspension" as the XC model.

    So is an AM the same as an XC? They both seem to fall under the "Full Suspension" category.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bclagge View Post
    I second this. Nothing you described sounds like you need an all mountain bike unless you're planning on jumping the thing off 10 steps at a time. You don't need the slack geometry, you don't need the weight, you don't need 5 inches of suspension travel.

    A ~100mm XC bike would likely do the trick, hard tail or full suspension. Look for one with lockout for the pavement.
    Mate if your jumpin off 10 stairs at a time you would buy a freeride bike, yes most All mountains can take it depending on the shock setup, but its not what their made for, i have a faith for doin that sort of stuff its made for it.
    All mountain bikes are not as tough as people make out, to an XC rider they look tough but to a free rider they look weak n feel weak, if the guy really wants to have a good time and work on his skills and have the bike to really challenge him i would not be buying a 100m xc bike, what happens when takin on the odd staircase turns to doing flights of stairs, what happens if he wants to challenge himself n start hittin some good jumps in the forest,
    Mate get all the bike you can, a decent all mountain rig is not heavy and nothing will be holdin you back except for your own skill level, cheers
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidjam View Post
    Here's where it starts to get confusing to me... the different bike types and how to identify them.

    All Mountain... when I go to a manufacturer's site, it doesn't always say "this is the All Mountain" model... Is AM the same as "Full Suspension"? If so, then it also lists "Full Suspension" as the XC model.

    So is an AM the same as an XC? They both seem to fall under the "Full Suspension" category.
    AM and XC bikes are very diff bikes, total diff class
    mate you can get a full suss in basically any class of bike, just as you can get a hard tail in any class..

    a AM bike has slacker geometry, more travel, built tougher, go study the giant website for an example and have a look at all the different specs, before buying a bike you need to do a hell of a lot of research, if you are asking these questions maybe your not ready to buy a bike just yet..

    First n formost how much are you going to spend on your bike and how serious are you about your riding?

    I think you need to do heaps of research before you ask what sort of bike you need, spend a few weeks or months getting a list of questions n find the answers, understand the diff between all the diff bikes, cheers
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  14. #14
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    Oddly enough, I agree with everyone above You could ride any of the bikes mentioned already and still have a good time.

    When I read your post, I was thinking, "oh, he wants to ride like a bike cop." You've sort of hit a nerve with the , "what claiisfication of riding do I do?" question. If you want to classify to do some Internet research, what you want doesn't really have a classification because we don't know how hard, fast or big you want to ride. Everything has a tradeoff. Here's some of my thought process:

    It doesn't sound like you're in a hurry to get anywhere so weight isn't a big issue.
    Your terrain is varied so you'll want an air fork with 120mm of travel a good lock out feature.
    Full suspension would be nice, but it's expensive to get a solid FS bike.
    If you're jumping and doing stairs, you'll want some good wheels.

    Tone asked a great question, "how much do you want to spend and how serious are you?"

    Check out this thread to get an idea of the types of bikes I had in mind when I made my suggestion. I've got one in there that I ride when I do what you're talking about doing.
    http://forums.mtbr.com/all-mountain/...rs-279265.html
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidjam View Post
    Here's where it starts to get confusing to me... the different bike types and how to identify them.

    All Mountain... when I go to a manufacturer's site, it doesn't always say "this is the All Mountain" model... Is AM the same as "Full Suspension"? If so, then it also lists "Full Suspension" as the XC model.

    So is an AM the same as an XC? They both seem to fall under the "Full Suspension" category.
    This is why I hate the term AM, it is meaningless.

    Tone's explanation is spot on though, AM should be considered more slack and more travel.

    I think a great place to start is your budget, this makes a huge difference when trying to steer you toward a bike. Let's say a DH bike is the best choice for you but your budget is only $400; well you're not getting a DH bike for that price so it isn't worth suggesting them.

    It might help if you answer some of the questions in post #1 from here: http://forums.mtbr.com/beginners-cor...de-811009.html just copy and paste it into this thread.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's L'axeman View Post
    AM and XC bikes are very diff bikes, total diff class
    mate you can get a full suss in basically any class of bike, just as you can get a hard tail in any class..

    a AM bike has slacker geometry, more travel, built tougher, go study the giant website for an example and have a look at all the different specs, before buying a bike you need to do a hell of a lot of research, if you are asking these questions maybe your not ready to buy a bike just yet..

    First n formost how much are you going to spend on your bike and how serious are you about your riding?

    I think you need to do heaps of research before you ask what sort of bike you need, spend a few weeks or months getting a list of questions n find the answers, understand the diff between all the diff bikes, cheers
    I like your thought process of going with something I can grow into.

    I will be very serious about my riding in that I'll be riding several days per week and will want to take my bike to different places. But I'm not serious about a specific type of riding such as downhill or stunting. I like to take my camelbak and some food and just ride all day, on mountain trails or through small town streets or through fields.

    I'm still a ways away from buying a bike I just want to do all the research to get the right bike for when I take the plunge.

    As for price, I'm looking at the high end Ibex's which run between $1500-$2500 or the Cannondale's which are looking like they'll be around $3000-$4000. Those are the main brands I'm familiar with so those are the prices I'm going off of right now, but if there are some other brands I would consider anything in that range. So let's say $2k-$4k.

    I'm also curious as to whether I should be going for a 26 or a 29er. I'm 6'1" and almost 200 pounds so as I understand it I might feel better on a 29er but I'm not sure exactly what those are used for, if it's just the size or if it's used for a certain type of riding.

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    I will post pics next, I just didn't have enough posts to put them in this post.

  18. #18
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    I just uploaded a bunch of photos of the places I used to ride so you can see the kind of riding I do. You can see those here:

    Photos showing the kinds of riding I do.



    You can see the old Ibex Alpine I was using in Italy. I liked that bike a lot but I always thought there could be something lighter and that could cover more ground more quickly.


    Then you can see the Schwinn I've been using here in the USA. I didn't have a bike and just wanted to ride so I went and bought that just to get out there. It already has a bent wheel and many other problems.


    I do like a light-weight bike since I find myself having to carry it sometimes when there's too much mud or I have to go over a fence or something.
    Last edited by skidjam; 09-07-2012 at 07:46 AM.

  19. #19
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    Well great your talking bout a real budget for a bike, in between 2-3k you can get a great bike, the first two bikes i suggest you look at are the santa cruz heckler and giant reign, not so much to buy them but they are both classed as an AM bike and both very popular n good bikes, two bikes you can have a tonne of fun on n nothin will hold you back bar your own skill level, then compare these to some XC bikes n note the difference in geometry, fork n shocks, rims, read a tonne of blogs about them n get to know what others do on them, then read a tonne of blogs on XC bikes n learn what people do on them.
    its imo much better to have more of a bike than lesser bike..
    AM bikes are not heavy at all, they are fine to ride round on for hours on end, i have riden a trance which is xc and an my reign, theres not a massive amount of diff, if anything i enjoy riding the reign better for razzin around, i paid 2k for it new last year and i love it.
    im not sayin buy a giant here im just saying get familiar with a few tried n tested ones like the Heckler n reign n you can use these as a gauge for others.....
    dont let anybody talk you into getting a bike that isnt up to what you might want to do in the future, and dont listen to people that tell you AM bikes are to much of a bike, its ********, as i said if your an XC rider you think they are to much a bike but if you own a freeride bike you think they are not enough, to me they are a happy medium and theres no way id trust a XC bike to really have some fun with n bomb down stairways n pull a few jumps, imo a AM only just gets you into that territory nothin less, cheers mate, send us a PM if you need any help,......
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  20. #20
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    I have one bone to pick with the advice you're giving Tone. You keep referring to an AM bike as "more bike" than a XC bike, implying that they're inherently better, but in reality, you mean more travel and more durability(and more weight). An AM bike as we've defined in this thread is designed around a particular kind of riding, just as a XC bike is. No one tool is better, except as it is applied to the task at hand. So the question really is what kind of riding is he going to be doing?

    The impression I got from his original post and reinforced by the pictures he's put up is he's basically riding fire roads and some in city riding. Somehow you've extrapolated "ride it down some stairs" into "bomb down stairways n pull a few jumps."

    skidjam: As I said each type of bike is a tool better suited to different jobs. They will both substitute, but there are advantages and disadvantages to each. An AM bike is designed with more suspension travel than a XC bike. The advantage to that is if you want to do jumps or bomb down stairs with abandon it gives you more cushion for the hits. The disadvantages are that it increases the weight of the bike and you incur pedal bob. Pedal bob is when the suspension soaks up some of the energy you're outputting instead of putting it on the trail. Because of this a XC bike will be more efficient on the climbs and potentially on the flats as well, with the cost being more temperamental on the descents.

    To reinforce my point, every single rider who placed in the Olympics was riding a XC bike. Every single rider in the UCI Downhill races are riding big hit DH rigs. (AM falls somewhere in between). Two different styles of riding, two different types of bike. Neither one is inherently better - it all depends on what you're looking to do.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by bclagge View Post
    I have one bone to pick with the advice you're giving Tone. You keep referring to an AM bike as "more bike" than a XC bike, implying that they're inherently better, but in reality, you mean more travel and more durability(and more weight). An AM bike as we've defined in this thread is designed around a particular kind of riding, just as a XC bike is. No one tool is better, except as it is applied to the task at hand. So the question really is what kind of riding is he going to be doing?

    The impression I got from his original post and reinforced by the pictures he's put up is he's basically riding fire roads and some in city riding. Somehow you've extrapolated "ride it down some stairs" into "bomb down stairways n pull a few jumps."

    skidjam: As I said each type of bike is a tool better suited to different jobs. They will both substitute, but there are advantages and disadvantages to each. An AM bike is designed with more suspension travel than a XC bike. The advantage to that is if you want to do jumps or bomb down stairs with abandon it gives you more cushion for the hits. The disadvantages are that it increases the weight of the bike and you incur pedal bob. Pedal bob is when the suspension soaks up some of the energy you're outputting instead of putting it on the trail. Because of this a XC bike will be more efficient on the climbs and potentially on the flats as well, with the cost being more temperamental on the descents.

    To reinforce my point, every single rider who placed in the Olympics was riding a XC bike. Every single rider in the UCI Downhill races are riding big hit DH rigs. (AM falls somewhere in between). Two different styles of riding, two different types of bike. Neither one is inherently better - it all depends on what you're looking to do.
    yes mate your spot on, you need the right tool for the job, and yes i dont mean the AM are a better bike, just more travel, built a bit stronger, slacker, the point i was trying to make is they are a bit more durable for general stuffing about and you can push your self a bit harder on them in terms of stairs n taking on new bigger stuff, im terms of razzing around you have more of a scope with a AM in my opinion, only my opinion, cheers mate
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  22. #22
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    Update...

    I stopped by my local shop today and they had a Cannondale Scalpel 29er (alloy) in stock. I've been wanting to try that exact model for some time so I took it for a quick spin. Very different from a 26 but what a ride.

    Still not sure if I'll go 26 or 29... I like the control of a 26 but the 29 had something to it...

    I think I'll try out the Jekyll model next if I can find one.

  23. #23
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    ^ whatever you feel good on and inspires you and its good quality n will do the things you want, is the bike for you, cheers
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  24. #24
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    From the pictures I'd say you could do that on a trekking bike. A nice light XC HT or full suspension would do great. But if you want to ramp up the terrain a bit later a bike with 120-140 suspension would be a better choice.

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