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  1. #1
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    Tubeless install

    I've never done one before. Had the lbs do my tubeless conversion. However, I'm in the process of putting on new tires and figured I'd try to tackle it myself. I have the tires on the rim, but before wasting my sealant, I figured I'd try to make sure my adaptor for my compressor would work. It doesn't even come close to getting the bead to seat. Do you have to have sealant in there to get any kind of seal at all? It seemed like the air was just blowing straight through when I did a dry test run. I figured it would at least blow the tire up a little bit with no sealant, but it didn't even hold the slightest amount of air.

  2. #2
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    I always inflate the tire and seat the bead before putting the sealant in, way cleaner and easier ime.

    Did you remove the valve core? Definitely you'll move a lot more air without it and the tire will seat much more easily.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  3. #3
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    I did remove the core. Shot air into the stem with a rubber tipped air gun. Maybe my small air compressor doesn't move enough air.

  4. #4
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    Even a comperssor with a small storage tank should work fine. I'm guessing you're tires and rims are tubeless ready?

    As mentioned mine hold fine without sealant, I haven't tried it but I could probably ride them that way.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  5. #5
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    As J.B said, definitely need to remove the valve core to get enough air volume in to seat the bead. Depending on what the rim/tyre combo is, you can actually go around the wheel and pull most of the tyre bead up onto the rim bead to help sealing. If you have trouble still, install with a tube, then break the deal on one side and remove the tube, then you only have to fight with one bead to get seated. LOTS of good videos on YouTube, check the Park Tools.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  6. #6
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    My wife's bikes are SUPER easy to seat the bead. Little compressor, even with the valve cores installed, and the tires pop right on.

    My fatbike, OTOH, is a royal PITA. I have to seat the beads with a tube, then break one side to remove the tube, install my tubeless valve stem, and THEN my compressor will seat the remaining bead. I have tried, but I cannot pre-install the bead on one side by hand. The fit is too tight.

  7. #7
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    How much pressure did you have in the compressor when you tried seating the tire?
    What tire?
    What rim?

  8. #8
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    Compressor isn't necessarily the issue. I've only used a basic hand pump to seat my beads.

    OP, you need to take a moment to work your way around the tire to 'lift' the tire onto the bead shelf (pull it out of the deeper rim well).

    Once the tire is up on the shelf the air will push it outward more than the air will escape. You probably won't be able to get it all the way onto the shelf, but at least get some/most of it up there.
    Granted a compressor should provide enough volume to push the tire up onto the shelf, but it evidently is not doing that.

    Also, I have been fortunate enough to seat the tires with a hand pump with the valve core still installed.

    Just last weekend I pulled down both tires to add sealant. Waste of my time. The tires were nearly empty but they were still 'wet'. Once the air hit the sealant it became sticky. As I reinstalled the tire to the rim (after I poured sealant in), the insides of the tire were sticking together and I needed 2 pair of pliers to pull the tire apart.

    This was the first time I broke the bead to add sealant and probably my last. The first tire was a mess. Not really a mess on the 2nd tire, but very unnecessary. Pouring into the valve core is clean and quicker (for me). And bonus, the bead doesn't break. I broke down the tires so that I could wipe out the interior and switch sealant brands.

    The end story, no you do not need sealant to get the tire setup. Realistically, you do not need sealant at all. Sealant is there to prevent seeping through pores of the tire but more importantly, there to fill a puncture should you encounter one. Consider a tire that was allowed to run dry, it still holds air. Just not for a long as one that has sealant to coat the tires interior.

    That being said, some tire/rim combinations can be easier than others. And of course tire size plays a factor. My only scenario is Specialized tires (2.3) on Roval aluminum wheels.

    Good luck. I'm sure you'll beat this challenge.

  9. #9
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    Sunringle duroc 45 tubeless ready rims with maxxis rekon + and high roller II 2.8 tires. I'll try to get the tire beads up out of the well of the rim and see if that helps. I was hoping, to make things easy, to get the tires set, and the put the sealant in through the stem. If all else fails I can take it to the lbs. there's supposed to be 8" of snow coming tonight/tomorrow, so I won't be riding anytime soon anyways.

  10. #10
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    Trial and error I think. Pull the tire up the best you can and shoot air at it. The tire will not need to 'look' like it has been seated prior to the air.....it just needs to be up enough to reduce the amount of air leaks. If you see areas that appear to be low and it hasn't inflated, pull those areas up a bit more. It's not too hard (on my wheels) to get out of the wells but will take a few minutes.

    The 2.8 does sound more challenging to inflate with a hand pump than what I have.

    Something to think about -considering you are having a difficult time inflating the tire with the compressor, when there is a puddle of sealant in the tire, not only can air escape the voids but so can sealant (so I hear). In case you were throwing in the towel and added sealant before seating the tires.

  11. #11
    since 4/10/2009
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    The wider the tire & rim, the more likely you will have a floppy fit that's hard to seat.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  12. #12
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    Well, I wrestled the high roller on and got it seated without the sealant. Gonna see if I can get the rekon to seat tomorrow while it's snowing, and if it works, I'll pull the stems and add the sealant. I'll say a prayer tonight and keep my fingers crossed on the rekon.

  13. #13
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    Suggestion: bring the tire indoors to do the work. If it's snowing I feel it is safe to say the cold tire will be more difficult to maneuver onto the rim than a warmer tire.

    You may notice the tire is low on air in the morning. That will be the air seeping through the pores of the tires. It's very possible it will be low but not necessarily flat.
    If the tire is seated, you're probably all set.

    Rumor has it, from a friend:
    She had tires set up as tubeless one day. That night the tires went flat (of course rested on the rim and broke the bead" and leaked sealant onto the floor. Sealant is not a mess you want to clean up.
    Soooooo. I'd suggest waiting to install he sealant until you can properly swish it around and take it for a short ride to allow the tire interior to be coated.

  14. #14
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    You can do what Stan's recommends and make a dish soap/water comb .put that around the bead/rim then air up. The soap/water makes it easier to get a seal plus it lubes the bead so it pops in place easier.

  15. #15
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    Good idea. It's not cold in my basement, but it's not hot either. Probably around 55 degrees down there. I'll bring the rekon up tonight where it's warm. I'm having trouble seeing how you can get any lube on the bead once the tire is mounted. It's a pretty tight fit between the tire and the rim. Do you put the soapy water on it before you mount it on the rim?

  16. #16
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    Never mind. I found the video and they just have it in a spray bottle.

  17. #17
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    Yep, just spray down the side of the tire. If you don't have a spray bottle (of any soap), you can mix it up in a bowl and apply it with your finger or sponge. Like you're washing dishes....just needs to have that slippery surface to help pop it up until it's locked in.

    Do you know how to check the bead to ensure the tire is properly locked in? Using the visual guides around the diameter of the tire.

    Sorry for the tip of bringing it indoors. I assumed you were doing this work in a colder garage. My bad.
    Last edited by Forest Rider; 3 Days Ago at 08:58 PM.

  18. #18
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    You can do what Stan's recommends and make a dish soap/water comb .put that around the bead/rim then air up. The soap/water makes it easier to get a seal plus it lubes the bead so it pops in place easier.
    with my fatbike tires, even that technique is of limited help. straight liquid soap is marginally better.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Yep, just spray down the side of the tire. If you don't have a spray bottle (of any soap), you can mix it up in a bowl and apply it with your finger or sponge. Like you're washing dishes....just needs to have that slippery surface to help pop it up until it's locked in.

    Do you know how to check the bead to ensure the tire is properly locked in? Using the visual guides around the diameter of the tire.

    Sorry for the tip of bringing it indoors. I assumed you were doing this work in a colder garage. My bad.
    There's a line/ edge about 1/8" from the rim all the way around both sides of high roller. Is that the indicator?

    No worries on the tip for bringing it indoors. It was a good tip. I used to put dirt bike tires in the oven to warm them up before installing them. It never crossed my mind to warm these tires a bit. The rekon sat in my living room last night in front of the fireplace where it's fairly warm. Maybe that'll help a little.

    There's about 6" of snow on the ground this morning. Crazy weather. We're getting a major winter weather event and it's technically not even winter yet.

  20. #20
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    Good news. The high roller still has plenty of air this morning. Didn't feel like it lost any air judging by the squeeze test!!! Gonna take my daughter out to play in the snow, then gonna try to get the rekon to seat.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MX9799 View Post
    There's a line/ edge about 1/8" from the rim all the way around both sides of high roller. Is that the indicator?

    No worries on the tip for bringing it indoors. It was a good tip. I used to put dirt bike tires in the oven to warm them up before installing them. It never crossed my mind to warm these tires a bit. The rekon sat in my living room last night in front of the fireplace where it's fairly warm. Maybe that'll help a little.

    There's about 6" of snow on the ground this morning. Crazy weather. We're getting a major winter weather event and it's technically not even winter yet.
    Yes, the line you are referring to is what I was referring to. Sounds like you're ready to rock. Well once the snow melts anyway.

  22. #22
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    Well, the rekon went on and the bead sealed without an issue. I finally got the high roller to go on when I laid the wheel down flat on the brake rotor. Left the rekon in the living room last night, used the soapy water spray on the bead, and laid it flat, and it popped right on when I shot the air to it. Glad my redneck rigged air gun with the rubber tip worked good enough to get enough air in through the stem to get them to seat.

  23. #23
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    I picked a good time to learn how to put them on. There's 12" of snow on the ground outside right now, and it all just turned to sleet. It sucks im not going to be able to use the new tires until next spring, but I had to get them from the discount bin at the lbs before somebody else did. Got the tires for $70 a piece. I think retail on them is around $100.

  24. #24
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    Nice job. Now you're ready for the ideal dirt conditions!

  25. #25
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    The tires never lost any air without the sealant in them. I put 4 oz of stans in each one, pumpes them back up to 20 psi, and shook/spun them around a lot. Hopefully they'll stay inflated with the sealant in too. My bike lost almost half a pound with these tires over the stock wtb rangers, but the maxxis tires are noticeably thinner. They measured 2.63" wide at 20 psi instead of 2.8", but I had read they ran thinner than advertised, so I kinda expected it. Looking forward to seeing if these tires offer more traction, especially in the front, than the stock rangers.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MX9799 View Post
    Glad my redneck rigged air gun with the rubber tip worked good enough to get enough air in through the stem to get them to seat.
    LOL, sounds like you got er done the same way I did my last set of tires. I have a presta to shrader adapter I use with my compressor tire chuck, but forgot I loaned the adapter to a co-worker and end up using the blow gun with a rubber nozzle. Removed the valve core, held the rubber nozzle on the stem and hit it with a blast of air. Worked like a champ and I thought was actually easier than messing with the adapter and tire chuck.

    No matter how long you do this, you will find that some tire/rim combinations will go together with little effort, inflate with a floor pump and then there will be situations like what you just experienced.
    Last edited by BrianU; 2 Days Ago at 10:23 PM. Reason: typo

  27. #27
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    Success!!! The tires still had 20 psi in them when I checked them this morning. I'll be ready to rip whenever the snow melts and the ground dries up. With all the rain we've had this year and this big snow I'm not sure when that'll be. Thanks for all the help folks.

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