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  1. #1
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    Toe clips?

    Hi, since I just got back to biking from a 8 years break (yeah I know) and last time I was on a bike I used toe clips.

    My new bike, Giant XTC2 2010, comes with standard pedals. I'm not ready to go clipless and thought about buying toe cplis just to avoid my feet going berserk when it's getting slippery.

    Are they a good idea?
    Can I put myself in more troubles?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Pedaler of dirt
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    Clipless are much easier to engage and disengage than toe clips. I used to ride toe clips, moved to clipless about 8 years ago and I've never missed 'em.
    It's not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required.

  3. #3
    Pimpmobile
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    If you aren't ready for clipless, you may enjoy a good set of flat pedals and a pair of 5-10 shoes.

    I run Wellgo B-77 pedals, haven't had much trouble with slippage.
    Some people here are going to tell you that you'll soon die using toe-clips, but if you have experience with them and you're comfortable, then ride what you like!
    "Fear not the ob-stackles in your path"

  4. #4
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    Toe clips are much harder to disengage than clipless. I've tired it once, and I'll never do clips again. It's just too dangerous.

  5. #5
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    Funny...my learning curve for toe clips seemed to be much less steep than my learning curve on clipless. I regularly ride with each.
    Quote Originally Posted by ridelikeafatkid
    "MOMMY, I WANT TO RIDE LIKE THAT FAT KID!" true story.

  6. #6
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    I was using clipless pedals back in 2000 too. I found them much easier to get in and out of than toe clips. The only real pitfall is if you're used to pulling your foot back to get out of a toe clip, it may take some time to get used to kicking your heel out.

    If you don't want to do clipless, get a nicer platform pedal. Looks like the above posters have already suggested a few. And shin guards.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by William_Cannon
    Toe clips are much harder to disengage than clipless. I've tired it once, and I'll never do clips again. It's just too dangerous.
    I think this touches upon a point that needs to be emphasized further.

    Riding with toe clips on the road is one thing, but riding with them on the trail is considered a serious safety risk. The reason is quite simple: While not specifically stated so far in this thread, one little tidbit about clipless pedals is that, in addition to their normal disengagement feature, they're also explicitly designed to unclip in an uncontrolled emergency yank, regardless of the direction in which you yank your foot from the pedal . As far as I know, the same is not true of toe clips; they'd just keep holding onto your foot in such a situation, unless you pull your foot correctly backward out of the clip. This fact about clipless pedals is highly likely to save your behind in a sudden crash when you don't have the time or presence of mind to think consciously about which way to move your foot to disengage from your pedal.
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  8. #8
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    No. Clipless pedals don't allow you to yank out regardless of the direction you yank. Aside from an accidental clip out or popping out in a wreck, you can only twist out of clipless pedals. With toe clips, you can only pull your foot out backwards. It boils down to muscle memory. If you're used to toe clips, you'll be fine. If you're used to clipless pedals and you're riding with toeclips, you won't be used to the motion of freeing your foot.

    Not a safety hazard at all, just an easy way to spot rookies and vintage guys.

  9. #9
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    I somehow managed to survive riding with toe clips for 20 years, only switching to platforms in the last couple of years, still have clips on one of my bikes. Just like clipless, once you use them long enough you really don't even think about it, you just automatically pull your foot out when you need to. I tried clipless twice over the years, nothing wrong with them, just never really warmed up to them, plus I don't like having to change shoes if I just want to hop on the bike and ride.

  10. #10
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by metaljim
    No. Clipless pedals don't allow you to yank out regardless of the direction you yank.
    No they don't, except for those wussy Shimano multi release cleats

    However, all sorts of minor spills are pretty common for me, and I cannot recall having hit the ground with the bike still attached to my shoes. There's enough twisting motions going on whether I am going to the side or over the bar.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by metaljim
    No. Clipless pedals don't allow you to yank out regardless of the direction you yank.
    I probably made it sound more absolute than I should have. What I meant was this:

    Start with the pedal release tension on its loosest setting; this will make it easier to get out of the pedal when learning and should also mean the pedal will naturally unclip from the shoe in an emergency stop.

    (from How to Cycle With Clipless Pedals at suite101.com)
    When you have the urge to suddenly take your foot off the pedal, your inclination is usually to pull your leg away from the bike. As you do this, since your leg is essentially pulling your foot out by the ankle while your shoe is clipped in near the ball of your foot, your foot is twisted as a natural result of these opposing tugs. That twist of your foot is pretty much identical to the twist motion you perform when unclipping more deliberately.

    I do concede that this doesn't mean you're always guaranteed to unclip successfully in an emergency, though. Just much more likely than you'd be with toe clips, that's all.
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  12. #12
    just ride
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    wellgo m-21 cheap and pretty light $20 @ 275 grams.

    wellgo mt-10 very cheap, $5 and does not require straps! Easy in & out and does not require special shoes. This is why I bought this since I use my bike for both work/commute and trails.

  13. #13
    Rod
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    I'll never use toe clips. A friend could not get out of them and went down with the bike causing him to break his collar bone. This has been years go when they were popular. You can keep them.

  14. #14
    Pimpmobile
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    Told ya!
    "Fear not the ob-stackles in your path"

  15. #15
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    Well I tried the bike with the stock pedals and they're not that bad...not the slippery plastic schnits I had 9 years ago.

    The wellgo you suggested look good, if mine goea bad, i'll replace them with those.

    Thanks for the tips, appreciated!!!

  16. #16
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    I ride with a set that I just pulled the straps out of. I've never had problems getting out of them, but they give me enough extra to keep me from bouncing off the bike in rough sections. They look just like the wellgo strapless now.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by erginguney
    I probably made it sound more absolute than I should have. What I meant was this:



    When you have the urge to suddenly take your foot off the pedal, your inclination is usually to pull your leg away from the bike. As you do this, since your leg is essentially pulling your foot out by the ankle while your shoe is clipped in near the ball of your foot, your foot is twisted as a natural result of these opposing tugs. That twist of your foot is pretty much identical to the twist motion you perform when unclipping more deliberately.

    I do concede that this doesn't mean you're always guaranteed to unclip successfully in an emergency, though. Just much more likely than you'd be with toe clips, that's all.
    If you have clipless pedals that don't release in a crash or whenever you want, I suggest you switch brands. Time pedals are easy to get out of, I believe Shimano pedals release well too. Clipless pedals should be like ski bindings and release when you need them to.
    fesch
    Riding in snow is for the desperate.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod
    I'll never use toe clips. A friend could not get out of them and went down with the bike causing him to break his collar bone. This has been years go when they were popular. You can keep them.
    The same can be said about clipless, as an inexperienced clipless rider I was unable to unclip in time after coming to a sudden stop and broke my fall with my elbow, cracking off a nice chunk of my medial epicondyle. Still recovering.

    I've been riding with my platforms for now, but as soon as I get back in shape I'll try clipless again.

  19. #19
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    While not being able to really afford clipless yet and having ridden with toe clips for years prior I bought some and installed really easy. They aren't bad getting out of unless you yank them down on your shoes. That being said I did fall because of them other the weekend before last. It was a low speed fall and something that is typical of clipless as well I think. I did find it better going through the "creek crossings" and having wet pedals afterward. The toe clips also help by being able to pull up on the pedals like clipless do. Once I have the money for pedals and shoes though I think clipless is the better bet.
    The obscure we see eventually, the completely apparent takes longer. (Edward R. Murrow)

  20. #20
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    I think it's all about preference. I'm a noob to the sport and already went clipless and don't regret it one bit. I'm yet to fall due to not being able to unclip. I decided to go clipless after one day ridding it was a little wet and my stock pedals(I was very happy with it till that day) started slipping. I actually ended up hanging from a tree at the top of a steep hill bc of the pedals slipping. I bought the pdm-540's. Set them up to the lowest setting and I've never look back. The first couple of rides I was thinking about the pedals all the time but it has become second nature. I've gone down a couple of times after the clipless and have always been able to come loose. I definitely recomend giving it a try. Just don't get too crazy at first. Good luck.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by marzjennings
    Clipless are much easier to engage and disengage than toe clips. I used to ride toe clips, moved to clipless about 8 years ago and I've never missed 'em.
    +1

    Go clipless, start with a very loose setting ie make it feel like you're clipping onto a magnet instead, that should give you confidence knowing that you can easily clip-out. Also, practice on dirt or trail or anything softer than asphalt. Realistically, you're going to fall...everyone does. Hell i fell waiting at a red light once cuzz i forgot i was clipped in (first couple of weeks of riding clipless), now it's just second nature. And if you wipeout, trust me, you won't be attached to the bike...lots of experience wiping out lol.

    IMO, clipless are easier torelease tahn toe-clips - clipless is safer for trail riding imo

  22. #22
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    The small toe clips were good for me until I went clipless.

    I wouldn't use the big ones or straps, but the small ones are just enough to keep your feet on the pedals during rough descents.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by metaljim
    ................

    Not a safety hazard at all, just an easy way to spot rookies and vintage guys.
    I guess I am a vintage guy then. I'll take that as a compliment.

    I don't mind mine at all. I keep them pretty loose though. They're tight enough to keep my feet in and to help with my upstroke, but loose enough to quickly slide out of.

    I've thought about going clipless, but never thought I truly needed to. Plus, money was a big factor.

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