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  1. #1
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    Time Atac Alium Pedals

    Do these have adjustable tension or no? Are they good pedals for someone to learn on? Also I am looking at these shoes
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail.htm?stylepkey=16457
    Do i need to modify them in any way to get them to work with the pedal i.e. shaving some tred?

  2. #2
    local trails rider
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    I don't think Alium has adjustable tension. They should be fine as first clipless pedal. Many prefer them over more recent models.

    The shoes look like they should work as-is. Cannot be sure just by looking at a pic. Do the shoes fit your feet?

  3. #3
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    no, they don't have adjustable tension - but it's not a big deal as far as clipping in or out - easy peasy. the cleats are swappable (l to r) to change release angles, so you can start of with the smaller angle. They are just good solid pedals.
    I have a similar pair of shoes as well, and did not have to do any trimming.
    good luck and have fun with your first fall!! (it will happen)

    oh - you might want to order a couple pairs of shoes - and send back the ones that don't fit (better than finding out w/ just one pair IMO)
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  4. #4
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    No adjustable tension. I use them and also have the composite ATAC XS's. No difference between them, really. The aliums are better for rock strikes in the long term. We ride a lot in the rocks and it was a serious consideration to cheap out by going with them and really, they rock.

  5. #5
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    I have the ATAC XS with adjustable tension which I have never adjusted in over a year and also a pair of ATAC Z's which have no adjustment and are the same as the Alium but with a platform.

    They are just good and very easy to get the hang of and I have not found any shoes that didn't work with them.

  6. #6
    local trails rider
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    ... if you want to spend more ... I like the new ROC ATAC better than my "old" ATAC XS ...

  7. #7
    I'd Rather be Doping
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    You can't adjust tension, but no need to. You will be happy with ATAC Aliums. I just rehabbed mine after 4 years and they are still going strong.

  8. #8
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    A different opinion....

    Are Times a good pedal to learn on? I don't know, I didn't start riding them until after I'd already learned.

    I learned on a cheap set of Wellgo SPD's. I still suggest this approach because there's a chance that you may not prefer riding clipped in. Learning how to clip and unclip isn't a brand specific action. All clippless pedals (except Frogs) function the same way. So SPDs will funciton in a very similar manner to spring loaded pedals (Times, CB)

    You can pick up a cheap set of spd's anywhere. Some of your more experienced riding buddies likely have a set you can try.

    My advice is to get used to riding clipless on a cheap set of SPDs with a tension adjustment. It's a low cost of entry and you'll be able to determine whether clipless is right for you or not and adjust the tension up as you become more confident in clipping and unclipping.

    Once you've outgrown the cheap SPD's, you can upgrade your pedals and keep your shoes. Pass the cheap pedals forward to another rider or keep them as a spare set.

  9. #9
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    Ken brings a really good point to the table. One note before I go on is that Aliums are available for about $50 or less around now. I got two pairs for 45.95 from Jenson probably back in 06. So the cost has to be a consideration with which spd's to use, such as knock offs, or genuine shimano, and on top of that, what types and used, factor in cleat wear, for instance.

    Now the spd could be a good idea for a trial because generally speaking, under some conditions, they are less forgiving than Times on entry. This can give valuable practice on foot placement to engagement, something that becomes automatic later, but early on, one must figure out mentally where the cleat is. Even when I went from SPD to Time, I experienced this learning curve again.

  10. #10
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    I learned on SPD's and the learning curve was steep....flopped over many times just because I had not trained myself to remove my foot from the pedal prior to stopping. I've since switched to Time ATAC XS' for knee reasons, but instantly felt comfortable in them....no learning curve. I wish I had started on the ATAC's since they release easier IMO.




  11. #11
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    Chicken or the Egg...

    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    I learned on SPD's and the learning curve was steep....flopped over many times just because I had not trained myself to remove my foot from the pedal prior to stopping. I've since switched to Time ATAC XS' for knee reasons, but instantly felt comfortable in them....no learning curve. I wish I had started on the ATAC's since they release easier IMO.
    So if you'd started on Times and switched to SPD's, I suspect your comments would have been the same, but reversed. The initial learning curve is the learning curve, regardless of the type of pedal. When you switch to another type of pedal, you of course, feel instantly comfortable because you've already gone through the learning curve on the first type of pedal.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    No adjustable tension. I use them and also have the composite ATAC Cs's. No difference between them, really. The alums are better for rock strikes in the long term. We ride a lot in the rocks and it was a serious consideration to cheap out by going with them and really, they rock.
    the new high end Xs with adjustable tension are a completely different design, they now are like crank bros, if you smack the bottom the pedal releases. if you look at the aluminums you can see the retaining bar is separate top & bottom, on the Xs the bar on top is connected to the bottom bar so when the bottom bars hits anything it also moves the top bar and out you go. total POS if you ride rocky conditions
    I couldn't really tell any difference in the tension no matter how it was adjusted either
    as far as I can tell its only the Xs the older alum & Z control use the original design
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by dan0; 01-02-2009 at 10:40 AM.

  13. #13
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    Huh?

    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    the new high end Xs with adjustable tension are a completely different design, they now are like crank bros, if you smack the bottom the pedal releases. if you look at the aluminums you can see the retaining bar is separate top & bottom, on the Xs the bar on top is connected to the bottom bar so when the bottom bars hits anything it also moves the top bar and out you go. total POS if you ride rocky conditions
    I couldn't really tell any difference in the tension no matter how it was adjusted either
    as far as I can tell its only the Xs the older alum & Z control use the original design
    Releasing when hitting a rock is nothing new with Times. I've been riding them for years and this is a common issue with Times.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC
    Releasing when hitting a rock is nothing new with Times. I've been riding them for years and this is a common issue with Times.
    much worse with the new Xs, look at the schematic. before you had a fairly strong connection that would let go if you really torqued it or if your cleats or pedals were worn, now it just takes a light tap while moving forward to move the upper bar to full open and release
    before I knew that it was only the Xs, I was so disgusted that I switched over to SPD

  15. #15
    local trails rider
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    Looks like the ROC ATAC is a return to the older (better) mechanism, with a very good new body design.
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=25489

  16. #16
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    Im looking at under $50 for clipless pedals so thats why I like the ATAC Alium.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by schmitty8225
    Im looking at under $50 for clipless pedals so thats why I like the ATAC Alium.
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/C...CategoryID=681
    $36.50 here

  18. #18
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    Nice that is cheaper than Jenson, I put an alert for that for when it gets restocked.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by schmitty8225
    Nice that is cheaper than Jenson, I put an alert for that for when it gets restocked.
    Just use the price quote and get them from pricepoint when (if) you get those settes. pricepoint will price match - and you'll likely save on shipping if you get the two from the same place
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  20. #20
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    Go the Aliums - they're a great pedal. The entry point is slightly wider than on SPDs (I think), although initially the spring tension is reasonably firm. So when I switched I found them easier to get into than SPDs but slightly harder to get out of.

    For me the real selling point for Time pedals is they performance in muddy conditions. I found SPDs really hard to get in or out of once I got mud on my shoes, resulting in a couple of "stop and fall over" incidents.

  21. #21
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    I started on the Aliums not too long ago. I found them pretty easy to learn on. I almost took a spill my first time trying them, but I unclipped and caught myself. I've been really happy with them.

  22. #22
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    Hm, I guess I have different experience with Time ATAC. I bought them for my road bike for the added float. It has quite a bit of spring tension and angle to pop out. Nearly killed my knee when I fell on the mountain bike when I couldn't clip out.

    I went back to SPD for two reasons. 1) The new SPD design clears mud way better. 2) I can adjust the tension to near nothing to pop out when I need to put a foot down.

  23. #23
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by traffic002
    quite a bit of spring tension and angle to pop out.
    Are you sure you had the cleats on the right shoes?

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