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  1. #1
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    Super Noob Question 2

    Dear all,

    I just bought a full suspension mountain bike few weeks ago. The bike comes with 27 speed gear shift device. My question is how to play around with the gear ratio for the following condition:

    1. Straight road
    2. Uphill

    Will i be able to set the gear ratio both front and rear to the largest sprocket and vice versa? Or it has to be always opposite to each other (high gear for front & low gear for rear)? Please advice... and sorry for asking such dumb question.

  2. #2
    AKA Dr.Nob
    Reputation: gumbymark's Avatar
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    The late, great Sheldon is the man to ask.


    http://sheldonbrown.com/gears.html

    Look around the rest of the site for more really good info.

    If you have anymore Q's after reading this feel free to ask.
    Not that all teenagers are evil mind, just most of them.

  3. #3
    local trails rider
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    Uncle Sheldon knew his bikes...

    The basic thing: keep the gear choices such that the chain does not have to bend to the extremes left and right.

    For example, when the chain is on the left in front, try to avoid putting it on the two or three rear cogs on the right.

  4. #4
    wyrd bi ful rd
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    what i tend to do is to divide the 9 sprockets in the rear to 3 groups of 3 each and match them to the front 3 chain rings ... that way ... you do not put undue stress on the chain flexing sideways even though they are designed for a wider use.

    depending on the front derailleur that you are using sometimes you may not be able to cleanly use a certain gear ratio due to contact with the derailleur cage ... eg small chain ring and 3 smallest sprockets etc in any case that ratio can be obtained (close enough) using another combination ...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by gumbymark
    The late, great Sheldon is the man to ask.


    http://sheldonbrown.com/gears.html

    Look around the rest of the site for more really good info.

    If you have anymore Q's after reading this feel free to ask.
    Dear Gumbymark,

    Many thanks for the link. Visited the link. Have learned somethings by now.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinaman
    what i tend to do is to divide the 9 sprockets in the rear to 3 groups of 3 each and match them to the front 3 chain rings ... that way ... you do not put undue stress on the chain flexing sideways even though they are designed for a wider use.

    depending on the front derailleur that you are using sometimes you may not be able to cleanly use a certain gear ratio due to contact with the derailleur cage ... eg small chain ring and 3 smallest sprockets etc in any case that ratio can be obtained (close enough) using another combination ...
    Dear Chinaman,

    Aaaaaah... brilliant idea! Does it mean my front most left (smallest) chain ring will handle the rear most left of 3 sprockets (Largest 3), followed by the middle front chain ring to handle the rear 2nd set of 3 sprockets, while the most right (3rd) front largest chain ring will handle the most right (smallest) of 3 sprockets?

    Please advice.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by twwong
    Dear Chinaman,

    Aaaaaah... brilliant idea! Does it mean my front most left (smallest) chain ring will handle the rear most left of 3 sprockets (Largest 3), followed by the middle front chain ring to handle the rear 2nd set of 3 sprockets, while the most right (3rd) front largest chain ring will handle the most right (smallest) of 3 sprockets?

    Please advice.

    That may be a bit extreme, but would be ideal.

    Most people just try to:
    front small (left): avoid using the two or three smallest (right) rear;
    front med (middle): avoid using the smallest (left) or largest (right) rear;
    front large (right): avoid using the two or three largest (left).


    As perttime mentioned, "The basic thing: keep the gear choices such that the chain does not have to bend to the extremes left and right." Myself, I use the whole range on the rear with the front middle - if I'm not hammering (uphill for instance). At my present condition (out of shape from not riding over the winter), I don't have to worry about too much hammering. lol
    Last edited by rlouder; 04-08-2008 at 06:58 AM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rlouder
    That may be a bit extreme, but would be ideal.

    Most people just try to:
    front small (left): avoid using the two or three smallest (right) rear;
    front med (middle): avoid using the smallest (left) or largest (right) rear;
    front large (right): avoid using the two or three largest (left).


    As perttime mentioned, "The basic thing: keep the gear choices such that the chain does not have to bend to the extremes left and right." Myself, I use the whole range on the rear with the front middle - if I'm not hammering (uphill for instance). At my present condition (out of shape from not riding over the winter), I don't have to worry about too much hammering. lol
    Dear rlouder,

    Many thanks for sharing your thoughts and advice. Will put it in mind always.

    Oh yes, i just found this link useful... and would like to share to those who were afraid to ask.. hehehe.

    http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/gears.html

    ONCE AGAIN, THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR YOUR INFO, gunbymark, perttime, chinaman, and not to forget... rlouder! Good night...!

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