Starting with/improving a single-speed?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Starting with/improving a single-speed?

    Hi all,

    I've been lurking around the internet for about two weeks trying to find anything and everything about starting out. Unfortunately, my budget is a large hindrance. With school, I don't have much money available, but I want to ride to work in the summer.

    I've stumbled upon a very simple single-speed: here.

    Can I add to/convert/improve such a bike? Such as, when I get more money, would I be able to improve it or would that be a waste (like trying to improve a department store bike would be)? What I really want is a decent bike to start with that I can improve later when I get money freed up. Would this type of bike (or a different single-speed) fit that bill?

    I'm not concerned about it being harder to ride than one with tons of gears. My commute would be fairly flat and I'm active and ride exercise bikes at school and do well with them. I'm more than willing to push myself harder if it means buying something reasonable. I'm just kind of flustered because there are so many choices and biking seems expensive (for me, at least). I just want something sturdy that is inexpensive.

    I've checked local stores and private sellers (craigslist, etc...), but since I'm from a small town, pickings are slim.

    Any help is appreciated!

  2. #2
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    Look here its a good budget shop all of the bikes are alot for the money

  3. #3
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    As long as you are staying strictly on pavement, that will be a fine bike. Good for commuting, nice and simple somewhat unappealing to steal (which trust me, is a good thing), and it should ride pretty fast. I've never had much issue running my fixie even when it comes to hills. You get used to it pretty quickly. The price is right, but for a pavement commuter you could probably save yourself some money by scouring garage sales and classifieds.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  4. #4
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    zebrahum, that's sort of what I've come to terms with since I posted this. I just need to keep waiting until something turns up around my area. I just didn't know how good a bike I would need for pavement commuting.

    Is there anything in particular I should look for? I know that to convert a bike to single speed it's easier if there is a horizontal dropout, but aside from that is there anything that could restrict me from turning a garbage find into a single speed?

  5. #5
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    No, that's pretty much your only hold up. You will need to find a bike that allows you at least a small amount of movement to adjust chain tension. If you use a half link in your chain then you shouldn't need much room for adjustment. Some older road frames have semi horizontal drops, I've had good luck with those and a half link in the past. But as far as completes go, you can't go wrong with that one you linked to.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  6. #6
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    Okay, thanks a lot. I'm just going to wait and search for one that I can build up I suppose.

    And jpeters if you posted a link, I don't see it.

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