Sore Forearms- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Sore Forearms

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    2

    Sore Forearms

    Hello,

    I'm relatively new to the All mountain scene, I picked up a commencal aggresive hard tail and was doing some more flow trails on the north shore. With my confidence growing on pace with my skill I'm now decending on blacks on fromme (7th, espresso) and am starting to have trouble. After the 1hr+ climb, the descends on the terrain are killing me on my hard tail. My forearms and quads are just destroyed, I understand death grip, but I cannot hold on any lighter or else I won't be able to steer the technical trails.

    I was wondering, is this only because I'm doing downhill on technical trails and it should go away after I build up more endurance throughout the season?

    As for my quads, did this happen to other people? did it go away? I've notice it dissipate a bit in the last few weeks but it's still present to where mid trail I have to take a break to rest both my arms and legs.

  2. #2
    jcd's best friend
    Reputation: Battery's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,620
    Sounds like bad case of arm pump. It happens to just about anyone regardless whether the bike is full suspension or hardtail. You will want to start a training program to build up your muscles and build flexibility. I recommend linking up with Dee Tidwell and consider his training programs: https://enduromtbtraining.com/
    Cannondale Synapse Neo | Salsa Timberjack

  3. #3
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    28,742
    There are also some equipment choices you can make to ease things up. That soreness is related to a few things.

    Braking is a big contributor. The harder you're squeezing the brakes, the more you'll get arm pump. I've reduced it a LOT by moving to a big, burly brake on my Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead. I've got Hayes Dominion A4's on that bike. Super easy braking effort with those.

    Also make sure your suspension settings are working for the kind of riding you're doing. If you're fighting your suspension setup, that will make you fatigued faster.

    Also make sure that your bars aren't too stiff. I like a little bit of "give" to help soften the hits a little. I've had super stiff bars in the past, and they definitely increase fatigue.

    I won't say I don't get arm pump anymore. But, it's not overpowering every other aspect of riding. Honestly, I get more lower body fatigue these days as my legs are doing their own bit of work.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    There are also some equipment choices you can make to ease things up. That soreness is related to a few things.

    Braking is a big contributor. The harder you're squeezing the brakes, the more you'll get arm pump. I've reduced it a LOT by moving to a big, burly brake on my Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead. I've got Hayes Dominion A4's on that bike. Super easy braking effort with those.

    Also make sure your suspension settings are working for the kind of riding you're doing. If you're fighting your suspension setup, that will make you fatigued faster.

    Also make sure that your bars aren't too stiff. I like a little bit of "give" to help soften the hits a little. I've had super stiff bars in the past, and they definitely increase fatigue.

    I won't say I don't get arm pump anymore. But, it's not overpowering every other aspect of riding. Honestly, I get more lower body fatigue these days as my legs are doing their own bit of work.
    Okay, the braking makes sense, and since I'm relatively new I have to take it slow and without confidence it's a snowball effect, more braking more tired forearms, what do you mean by your comments on the suspension? I'll have to check the sag, but it's usually on the softest setting for when i'm in the rock garden type riding.

  5. #5
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    28,742
    Quote Originally Posted by Kawasak View Post
    Okay, the braking makes sense, and since I'm relatively new I have to take it slow and without confidence it's a snowball effect, more braking more tired forearms, what do you mean by your comments on the suspension? I'll have to check the sag, but it's usually on the softest setting for when i'm in the rock garden type riding.
    There are plenty of articles and videos online that address suspension setup, and I can't do it justice here. It's a lot more detailed than just "setting sag" because there are usually other adjustments possible even on the least expensive suspension forks.

    For example, if your rebound is too fast (damping is too low), the fork springs back too quickly and it can buck on you and you can feel like you're fighting the bike. If the rebound is too slow (too much damping), then the fork will still be partially compressed when it hits the next bump, leaving you with less travel to work with.

    Too much compression damping can mean that small, chattery bumps don't get absorbed and the bike feels harsh. Too little compression damping and maybe you find yourself using too much of your available suspension travel just pedaling hard on flat ground from the bike bouncing around.

    The linear vs. progressive spring adjustments can make things a fair bit more complicated, but they play a role, too. If you have a coil spring, you need to make sure that the weight of the coil spring is suited to your weight. This has a similar effect as adjusting air pressure on an air fork.

  6. #6
    Ride, Race, Live
    Reputation: Mick-e's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    211
    Quote Originally Posted by Kawasak View Post
    As for my quads, did this happen to other people? did it go away? I've notice it dissipate a bit in the last few weeks but it's still present to where mid trail I have to take a break to rest both my arms and legs.
    My 2 cents is it's your body position.
    Not that brakes, and suspension can't be improved but both quads being sore, and forearms being sore at the same time are relative to the shape you are making on the bike.
    I can attest to this.
    https://forums.mtbr.com/california-n...s-1083673.html
    See post #5 in that thread.
    This turned out to 100% my problem.
    I was "Squatting" too much and not hinging enough at the hips in an attempt to bring my chest lower.
    That squatting put too much weight on the quads and forearms, and not enough supported by calves, and core.
    You'll see written, and watch on the 'tubes to "Hinge at the waist, and engage your glutes"
    WTF does that mean?
    Butt up, chest down, and you'll feel just the start of a stretch in your hamstrings.
    This also leaves your knees more straight so you have more space to move up and down as the terrain varies.
    Once I figured out what this felt like one bike, and could repeat it the trail changed. I was so much more in control.
    Try it.

Similar Threads

  1. Forearms going numb
    By liberatorx in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 04-08-2011, 03:31 AM
  2. How many of you have tired forearms after a ride?
    By surftime in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 03-07-2011, 10:49 PM
  3. Sore Elbows
    By bloodyknee in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-06-2011, 05:41 PM
  4. Sore hamstring muscle group at knee bend
    By Speedster in forum Rider Down, injuries and recovery
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-02-2011, 07:48 AM
  5. Sore Areas
    By daveholte1 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-27-2011, 07:37 PM

Members who have read this thread: 38

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.