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  1. #1
    czm
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    Skills going backwards

    I am new to MTB, been on it for about six months now and enjoying it immensely.

    When I first started I had no expectations or idea on what I was doing which actually resulted in some pretty decent runs on my local trials (Berms sections ect ect)
    However now I am more conscious of trying to improve times and increase skill level to do things ďbetter/by the bookĒ I feel (and the times I am getting support this) like my I am going backwards.

    As an example which I would really like help/advise with: It seems on tight corners/berms I cannot get round without over shooting the corner and going badly off line, itís like I canít get tight enough. I am getting low with the dropper down but it feels I am leaning backwards really badly in the process Ė would that explain it?

    Any help would be greatly received

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by czm View Post
    It seems on tight corners/berms I cannot get round without over shooting the corner and going badly off line
    Go slower.

  3. #3
    czm
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Go slower.
    Thanks, it does seem however that i sometimes struggle to keep on line even at low'ish speed?
    Its feels like I am fighting the gravity/inertia of my body

  4. #4
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    First off, stay loose and relax, you could be thinking so hard itís tensing you up and making it hard for your body to naturally make the necessary adjustments to rail those turns. Focus on turning your hips hard in the direction you want to go and keep your eyes further down the trail where you want to go. Upon entering the turn you should be looking at the exit. Itís amazing how much doing these two things can help.

    Also, brake early so you arenít braking in the turn. Braking in the turn will stand the bike bike up and make it harder to hold your line. Finally, really lean the bike over hard and then dial in back as needed. I donít know what tires youíre running, but leaning the bike over hard will ensure youíre engaging the outside lugs and not stuck in that vague area between the inner and outer lugs. You mentioned being way off the back of the bike, if too much of your weight is over the back, you could be losing grip in the front allowing it to wanderó put more weight on your bars to engage your front tire and those side lugs as you are turning. If youíre still struggling, setup a camera/GoPro with a good view of a turn and take a video of yourself. Watch that video and see if anything stands out as looking odd.
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  5. #5
    czm
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shartist View Post
    First off, stay loose and relax, you could be thinking so hard itís tensing you up and making it hard for your body to naturally make the necessary adjustments to rail those turns. Focus on turning your hips hard in the direction you want to go and keep your eyes further down the trail where you want to go. Upon entering the turn you should be looking at the exit. Itís amazing how much doing these two things can help.

    Also, brake early so you arenít braking in the turn. Braking in the turn will stand the bike bike up to and make it harder to hold your line. Finally, really lean the bike over hard and then dial in back as needed. I donít know what tires youíre running, but leaning the bike over hard will ensure youíre engaging the outside lugs and not stuck I that vague area between the inner and outer lugs. You mentioned being way off the back of the bike, if too much of your weight is over the back, you could be losing grip in the front allowing it to wanderó put more weight on your bars to engage your front tire and those side lugs as you are turning. If youíre still struggling, setup a camera/GoPro with a good view of a turn and take a video of yourself. Watch that video and see if anything stands out as looking odd.
    Thats awesome advice, thank you very much.

  6. #6
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    It seems on tight corners/berms I cannot get round without over shooting the corner and going badly off line, itís like I canít get tight enough. I am getting low with the dropper down but it feels I am leaning backwards really badly in the process
    Over shooting and leaning back sound like braking issues. If you enter a corner hanging off the back off the bike and braking hard (some people get really far back while braking) then it's very hard to get into proper cornering position. Try a combination of braking early and when you brake get low but only as far back as you need to.

    Other randoms tips...
    1) Use your dropper (get one if you don't have one)
    2) Use a pre-turn in tight corners (see video below)
    3) Lean the bike more. It's easy to feel like you're leaning the bike a lot but you may actually be leaning your body into the turn and only leaning the bike slightly more.
    4) Don't just go through the motions. You've learned the general form ( lean the bike not your body, drop the outside foot, etc.) but are you actually weighting the outside pedal, are you looking ahead, etc?
    5) Carefully assess your body position. If you keep hitting corners and it feels wrong, think about why. Go back and session that corner and do some serious evaluation of what's happening.

    I highly recommend Simon Lawton's videos on cornering. He breaks down a lot of aspects I haven't seen mentioned anywhere else.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQoLJfvVoa8

  7. #7
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    OP, you may benefit from a more aggressive front tire depending on what you have on there now.

    I also like this vid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gF5K9V2w6W8

    Ultimately it takes time and practice. Think in terms of seasons and years, not weeks or months. It will come with more time and practice.
    Last edited by *OneSpeed*; 1 Week Ago at 05:46 AM.
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  8. #8
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    a big piece of advice that has really helped me - and already mentioned in thus post - is the looking "past" or "Through" the turn/obstacle etc...for many things, this has helped me get through stuff on the trail. And repeating/re-riding the same area for reps will also help...I feel like the "looking down the trail" thing helps me connect the lines through the berms well

    also, for your specific question, possibly try finding a skatepark maybe, and riding some of the curves in the bottom of bowls or quarter/half pipes. Doing that via BMX, for me, really gave me an edge for bike handling on berms and turns on the trail.
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  9. #9
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    Consider some skills instruction. Lots of classes out there ranging from one-on-one stuff to group work. They all have their place. If anything, they can give you the tools that you can take home and use to practice more effectively. Plus, the group classes I've taken or otherwise attended have been a lot of fun.

    For cornering, you absolutely need your body centered or slightly biased towards the front. Brake before the corner. When practicing, go even slower than you might when riding the trail, so you can dial in your technique and have more time to do so. Increase speed later as your comfort level increases and things become automatic. Lean the bike into the corner. ROTATE YOUR WHOLE BODY to point it where you want to go. Don't just turn your head to look. Stick your butt towards the berm! Seriously, hang it off the side of the bike so you can rotate your hips, point your belly button where you want to go (honestly, if you rotate like this, I don't think you'll even need to think about weighting the outside pedal...it'll just happen). Straighten your inside arm. Bend the outside arm. STAY LOOSE so you can adjust quickly!

    I'll also reiterate it's going to take quite awhile to make notable improvements on any one skill. I've been riding for 20yrs and I'm still working on my cornering technique. I think about all of those things I mentioned above when I'm on a trail with lots of corners that affords me the opportunity to think about them and put them to practice. And honestly, if I slow down and focus on technique, I'm usually faster overall through the section than I am if I'm focusing on hammering hard (and not on cornering technique).

  10. #10
    czm
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Consider some skills instruction. Lots of classes out there ranging from one-on-one stuff to group work. They all have their place. If anything, they can give you the tools that you can take home and use to practice more effectively. Plus, the group classes I've taken or otherwise attended have been a lot of fun.

    For cornering, you absolutely need your body centered or slightly biased towards the front. Brake before the corner. When practicing, go even slower than you might when riding the trail, so you can dial in your technique and have more time to do so. Increase speed later as your comfort level increases and things become automatic. Lean the bike into the corner. ROTATE YOUR WHOLE BODY to point it where you want to go. Don't just turn your head to look. Stick your butt towards the berm! Seriously, hang it off the side of the bike so you can rotate your hips, point your belly button where you want to go (honestly, if you rotate like this, I don't think you'll even need to think about weighting the outside pedal...it'll just happen). Straighten your inside arm. Bend the outside arm. STAY LOOSE so you can adjust quickly!

    I'll also reiterate it's going to take quite awhile to make notable improvements on any one skill. I've been riding for 20yrs and I'm still working on my cornering technique. I think about all of those things I mentioned above when I'm on a trail with lots of corners that affords me the opportunity to think about them and put them to practice. And honestly, if I slow down and focus on technique, I'm usually faster overall through the section than I am if I'm focusing on hammering hard (and not on cornering technique).
    Thank you all for the help, very useful and I will take them all on board. Looking at some tuition/course and I have seen this one which looks good. Any feedback from the UK guys on this company? UK Bike Skills
    https://ukbikeskills.co.uk/

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by czm View Post
    Thank you all for the help, very useful and I will take them all on board. Looking at some tuition/course and I have seen this one which looks good. Any feedback from the UK guys on this company? UK Bike Skills
    https://ukbikeskills.co.uk/
    They look pretty legit. First place I've seen that advertises a purpose built coaching facility.

    I know a couple spots in the US that sorta do something similar, but it is just an ancillary service they offer in addition to camping/lodging, shuttles, and guiding. Definitely isn't their primary business model like the place you linked.

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  12. #12
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    For a moment, I thought your post title was referring to riding backwards as in fakies!

    Oh and looking toward your exit point does work. I was taught that during a motorcycle training course and it helped me do the figure 8 box test (and generalized cornering of a motorcycle).
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    Always look where you want to go, not where you don't want to go. On the brakes early; 'trail braking' is ok; hardest braking is always in a straight line, less brake as you add turn, done with braking by mid turn/apex if not before.

    My brother was really good at sitting on the bars (backwards) and riding around, he got stopped by the cops in college for riding 'backwards' down the street in the middle of the night; college town cops: "stop doing that!" "why not?" "... -just stop doing that!!". I can just barely do it.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Go slower.
    ^^^This really is the root of the matter.

    When you can corner and hit your line exactly right without brake dabbing, it's time to speed up.

    Slow is smooth. Smooth is fast.

    Right?

    It seems everyone always thinks they can change tires or watch some videos or get a dropper and suddenly everything will be AWESOME.

    Wrong. Those are just distractions.

    Go practice. Figure it out.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  15. #15
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    You can also learn endo turns to use on switchbacks but that requires much more practice!
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    You've received some good advice, but I don't think anyone has suggested going out into the parking lot and practicing turns. I recommend starting slow and focusing first on keeping all your weight in your feet. Try to keep your arms totally loose while leaning the bike. All the weight should be in your feet. Inside foot should be forward, and you might want to drop the outside foot.

    The goal here is getting used to how a bike naturally wants to turn. It also helps your body get used to turning while staying balanced and neutral--neither leaning forward nor hanging off the back--and screwing the bike into the ground with your hips. When you get good at this, you should be able to get a nice low turn while barely holding onto the bars at all. You'll likely need to have a pretty decent hip hinge to pull this off.

    Later, you can add input from the arms to get more pump in the turns. Eventually pumping a turn will start feeling a lot like pumping a roller.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus View Post
    You've received some good advice, but I don't think anyone has suggested going out into the parking lot and practicing turns. I recommend starting slow and focusing first on keeping all your weight in your feet. Try to keep your arms totally loose while leaning the bike. All the weight should be in your feet. Inside foot should be forward, and you might want to drop the outside foot.

    The goal here is getting used to how a bike naturally wants to turn. It also helps your body get used to turning while staying balanced and neutral--neither leaning forward nor hanging off the back--and screwing the bike into the ground with your hips. When you get good at this, you should be able to get a nice low turn while barely holding onto the bars at all. You'll likely need to have a pretty decent hip hinge to pull this off.

    Later, you can add input from the arms to get more pump in the turns. Eventually pumping a turn will start feeling a lot like pumping a roller.
    good advice, but multiple folks DID recommend practice. I'm not sure the location matters a ton, so long as it's a place you can get super repetitive practice in an easy, low-consequence environment. parking lot. grassy field. your yard. bmx park. pump track. they all work. even a trail with repetitive turns can be good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    good advice, but multiple folks DID recommend practice. I'm not sure the location matters a ton, so long as it's a place you can get super repetitive practice in an easy, low-consequence environment. parking lot. grassy field. your yard. bmx park. pump track. they all work. even a trail with repetitive turns can be good.
    I think pavement is the best place to start, since it's readily available and it allows the rider to strip away most variables. Practice anywhere is better than practice nowhere, for sure.

    And I just skimmed through the thread again, and no one mentioned practicing in the parking lot. So I was TECHNICALLY correct. LOL. I'm just glad no one is recommending that he change his pedal type or upgrade his suspension.

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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus View Post
    I'm just glad no one is recommending that he change his pedal type or upgrade his suspension.
    You forgot rim width

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You forgot rim width

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You forgot rim width

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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    It's coming...
    That's only if he speaks to a manager!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    That's only if he speaks to a manager!
    He also needs a frame that allows him to turn in comfort too!
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  23. #23
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    There's some good advice here. A couple thoughts I have...

    Ride in front of, and behind people that are better then you on the trails you are practicing on. They might see what you can improve on and perhaps you can visualize what they are doing and translate that to your riding. Observing from the side of the trail is probably a good idea as well and footage of it might help.

    Also, don't think of the advice here as absolutes. On occasion you will need to weight the bars, or brake through a corner (try to stay off the front as it wants to stand the bike up or push front end out).

    my .01

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by EatsDirt View Post
    Also, don't think of the advice here as absolutes. On occasion you will need to weight the bars, or brake through a corner (try to stay off the front as it wants to stand the bike up or push front end out).
    this is absolutely why staying loose is so important. it allows you to react quickly to changes that can happen in the blink of an eye.

    every body+bike+trail combo is a little bit different and you've gotta be able to figure out the nuances that make all this work for you as an individual.

  25. #25
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    The two best tips for cornering I ever got came from other sports.

    From motorcycling:
    Look at the exit of the turn. sXeXBMXer mentioned looking through the turn -- this is the gist of it.

    From horseback riding:
    Point your navel where you want to go. Harold mentioned rotating your whole body -- this is the gist of it.

    Do these two things plus learn to trust your tires & suspension. In that regard, make damn sure your tire pressures are ideal and your suspension is set up properly. Then get agro. You'll be amazed.
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    If leading with the hip isnít coming to you, try pointing the knee where you want to go. Where the knee points the hip and bike will follow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You forgot rim width

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    And pedals; if you're on spd's switch to flats, but if you're on flats you need spd's.

    - lots of good videos from Simon at Fluidride:

    https://fluidride.com/cornering-videos
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyAsheville View Post
    If leading with the hip isnít coming to you, try pointing the knee where you want to go. Where the knee points the hip and bike will follow.
    Oh I like that.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    ^^^This really is the root of the matter.

    When you can corner and hit your line exactly right without brake dabbing, it's time to speed up.

    Slow is smooth. Smooth is fast.

    Right?

    It seems everyone always thinks they can change tires or watch some videos or get a dropper and suddenly everything will be AWESOME.

    Wrong. Those are just distractions.

    Go practice. Figure it out.

    -F
    I will be stealing the last line as my new sig....just FYI...would steal the last three lines if it would fit!!!
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by czm View Post
    I am new to MTB, been on it for about six months now and enjoying it immensely.

    When I first started I had no expectations or idea on what I was doing which actually resulted in some pretty decent runs on my local trials (Berms sections ect ect)
    However now I am more conscious of trying to improve times and increase skill level to do things ďbetter/by the bookĒ I feel (and the times I am getting support this) like my I am going backwards.

    As an example which I would really like help/advise with: It seems on tight corners/berms I cannot get round without over shooting the corner and going badly off line, itís like I canít get tight enough. I am getting low with the dropper down but it feels I am leaning backwards really badly in the process Ė would that explain it?

    Any help would be greatly received
    When I started racing motorcycles, I was riding like my hair was on fire, wanting to prove that being new didn't mean I was slow (or at least not last). Every corner was adrenaline filled "oh sh!t" moments and resulted in lap times to be proud of.

    Fast forward to season 3 and the oh sh!t moments were far and few between, fatigue was way down and though I felt like I wasn't trying as hard, I was riding smoother. About that time the seconds I was chopping off started being replaced with trophies.

    Smoother, technique, and not stressing about it actually made me faster.

    Just a thought.

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    Quote Originally Posted by czm View Post
    When I first started I had no expectations or idea on what I was doing which actually resulted in some pretty decent runs on my local trials
    That is a clue. You are overthinking it and killing all the joy. Try detaching your skills work from your riding of trails for fun. Ideally, work on the skills in a parking lot. For stuff that has to be done on the trail, session it after the ride. You shouldn't be thinking about executing skills at all when on the trail, it will come into play naturally.

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    Quote Originally Posted by czm View Post
    As an example which I would really like help/advise with: It seems on tight corners/berms I cannot get round without over shooting the corner and going badly off line, itís like I canít get tight enough.
    Here's a video on cornering.-

    Some parts may seem too advanced, but the technique and the recommended repetition of leaning your bike and keeping your body straight(1:45) is good for beginners to build confidence and skills you can rely on. Lean the bike with your outside foot down heel low before you get to the turn.

    At 4:55 he demonstrates how to practice the technique on a flat open area to get familiar with what it'll take you to make sharp turns back and forth one after another. Practice that drill over a few days.






    There are other more advanced belly button techniques you can learn later.

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    Just like the old saying goes "slow down to go faster".

    I had this situation the other day actually. Well 2x.

    I had recently bombed a good descent on my hard tail -PR based on Strava (Sorry but yes, I said Strava).
    Few days later I rode it on the full suspension and things were happening too fast. The soft flowy bike make me go faster than I realized and I kept making mistakes in the turns. I was still faster than the hard tail from a few days ago, but I was all out of shape a few times.

    My slow down to go faster point -the other night I came down a 10 minute descent. Legs too exhausted to power out of the turns as well as I prefer. Because of the fatigue I wasn't hitting the corners as hot. I started to realize how fun the corners were, or how smooth they felt to me. Looking at Strava times I was about top 5 times for myself and I thought I was about 20 seconds slower. There was a super soft area (from all the rains) that I slowed for as well. If not for the wetness I'm sure I'd be top 3 or top 4 of my own times despite riding tired. I flowed so much better and was only pushing where I could.

    So yeah, as mentioned a few times above, slow it down a little and you'll feel smoother and therefore will get faster again.

  34. #34
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    Wow - thanks all for the amazing advice, some really good things to think about there. I really is appreciated so thanks again.

    I have read so many time how friendly and helpful the MTB scene is and I think I have just seen for myself first hand

  35. #35
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    Forest Rider mentions an important point for learning. Recognize when you're tired. Don't continue to push. That's when more crashes and injuries can happen. Ride another day.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    OP, you may benefit from a more aggressive front tire depending on what you have on there now.

    I also like this vid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gF5K9V2w6W8

    Ultimately it takes time and practice. Think in terms of seasons and years, not weeks or months. It will come with more time and practice.
    Can't beat Fabien!
    "... it feels I am leaning backwards really badly in the process Ė would that explain it?"

    Yes, it could explain it. Being back on the rear wheel takes pressure off the front wheel which reduces its ability to track.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    "... it feels I am leaning backwards really badly in the process Ė would that explain it?"

    Yes, it could explain it. Being back on the rear wheel takes pressure off the front wheel which reduces its ability to track.
    This is especially true for folks who have ridden with/listened to/or who are old timers who rode in the early years of mtb when the bike biased your weight too far forward to begin with. all the little changes in modern bikes have brought the rider's center-of-gravity rearward, placing it in a more centered position between the wheels.

    The old mantra was to "lean back" anytime you got to anything remotely hairy, to prevent the dreaded OTB. On a more modern bike, you really have to screw up to go OTB like we used to on nearly every ride BITD. "leaning back" is a sure-fire way to lighten the front so much that you lose your steering control, which really is the opposite problem. Do that and you'll wash out, or push the front end of the bike through the corner, that sort of thing.

    Use the language "stay centered" instead. Simply put, it means keeping your weight between your wheels and over your bottom bracket. Weight through your feet and all that. Works on both new bikes AND old bikes. "Leaning back" on old bikes really had the effect of centering your weight better, anyway, since those old bikes with mile-long stems put your weight too far forward to begin with.

    The times you want to shift your weight past your axles is most typically when you're getting wheels off the ground. Wheelies, manuals, endos, tricks in the air, etc. And even then only for limited periods of time.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by czm View Post
    Wow - thanks all for the amazing advice, some really good things to think about there. I really is appreciated so thanks again.

    I have read so many time how friendly and helpful the MTB scene is and I think I have just seen for myself first hand
    A lot of us are very helpful on the trails too! I end up spending more time helping new riders than I am shredding. Don't be scared to ask for advice while out on the trails.
    Trek Emonda | Transition Scout | Transition PBJ

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    This is especially true for folks who have ridden with/listened to/or who are old timers who rode in the early years of mtb when the bike biased your weight too far forward to begin with. all the little changes in modern bikes have brought the rider's center-of-gravity rearward, placing it in a more centered position between the wheels.

    The old mantra was to "lean back" anytime you got to anything remotely hairy, to prevent the dreaded OTB. On a more modern bike, you really have to screw up to go OTB like we used to on nearly every ride BITD. "leaning back" is a sure-fire way to lighten the front so much that you lose your steering control, which really is the opposite problem. Do that and you'll wash out, or push the front end of the bike through the corner, that sort of thing.

    Use the language "stay centered" instead. Simply put, it means keeping your weight between your wheels and over your bottom bracket. Weight through your feet and all that. Works on both new bikes AND old bikes. "Leaning back" on old bikes really had the effect of centering your weight better, anyway, since those old bikes with mile-long stems put your weight too far forward to begin with.

    The times you want to shift your weight past your axles is most typically when you're getting wheels off the ground. Wheelies, manuals, endos, tricks in the air, etc. And even then only for limited periods of time.
    the element of pushing the weight down through your feet/bottom bracket is key as Harold mentions....I call it "sinking" into the curve, and do that alot. For me it comes from ice skating as well, I use the same weight shift to carve quick turns while playing hockey...you dig in to the center of the arc technically through the arch of your foot and the middle of the skate. I find if I do it right, i "shoot" out of the other side of the turn
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

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  40. #40
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    I'm new to riding, been riding 2 months, all the advice I can give is take it slow. I got cocky with my cornering and ended up fracturing my collar bone and separating my shoulder 2 1/2 weeks ago.

  41. #41
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    Many gems said at this point so i will express it differently but i agree with #4 and many more. Erase your thinking. You are focussing on the wrong Q. You are obsessing about Quantity, in this case speed. I suggest you focus on Quality, in this case = proper line. Brake/slow down pre turn and accelerate in the turn just like formula 1 drivers. I started that some months ago and it made a difference. Obviously pratice on dirt not rocks and slow progress is smart progress. No need to damage your bike and or yourself trying to prove stuff to you or others. Also you tube is a good help having the image helps. Here it is not evident using just words.
    If your area gets snow get a fatbike, yesterday i went over the bar and just laughed, landing on snow is cool.

  42. #42
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    Wish I could ride backwards o_0

    Actually, I have a couple of times...

    ...doesn't end well though >.<

    'Born to ride!'
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    Wish I could ride backwards o_0

    Actually, I have a couple of times...

    ...doesn't end well though >.<

    'Born to ride!'
    Consider changing you sig to "Born to ride backwards!"?
    =s
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    Wish I could ride backwards o_0

    Actually, I have a couple of times...

    ...doesn't end well though >.<

    'Born to ride!'
    Yeah its pretty difficult, its like learning to ride all over. Im lucky to get 10 feet.

    And for OP, dont get discouraged, theres always a kind of plateau effect, when you first start off youll see improvements in leaps, but as you get better it tapers. U need to work more to get less.

    For general skills building, try finding some like minded buddies to get together and play with. Make a game of it. Watching others session the same stuff and trying it over helps. But you need to find people who are into sessioning, some people just want to ride a trail and get bored waiting around to session one section repeatedly.

  45. #45
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    Unless you're jibb'in in the carpark...

    Can't see much use for riding backwards on the trails o_0

    'Born to ride!'
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

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    I'm not sure if it was mentioned already, but the reason may be not you or your improving skills. You mentioned that you've been riding 6 month, do you still use the tyres you've started on? Because they could be somewhat worn by now (rear especially) and not as grippy as when they were new - this could explain different handling while turning and braking.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by nampla View Post
    I'm not sure if it was mentioned already, but the reason may be not you or your improving skills. You mentioned that you've been riding 6 month, do you still use the tyres you've started on? Because they could be somewhat worn by now (rear especially) and not as grippy as when they were new - this could explain different handling while turning and braking.
    It's doubtful that he'd wear out a tire in 6 months. Even if they were, he should still be able to execute a turn. It's way more likely his body position through the corner is wrong and/or he's not leaning the bike enough.

  48. #48
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    Running wide can mean your rebound is too slow.

    But really, 6 months in I would just keep on putting in saddle time.

  49. #49
    czm
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    Thanks again all for the help, truly has been very helpful.

    I have changed a few things over the last few rides and it is amazing how different some small tweaks have made my style/technique better and I must say in some instances worse.

    The biggest/best difference is with my body/bike position. Thsi video has helped soo much, my body and bike were totally off and this video hit the nail on the head for me.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gF5K9V2w6W8

    Also, using this technique I felt I was going much slow on one particular berm segment...guess what? Turned out to be my best ever time!!!

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