Rules of mountain biking?

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  • 08-23-2011
    Mattlikestobike
    Rules of mountain biking?
    Hi everyone, i've been biking for a while now, and I was interested in general rules of mountain biking, or just mountain biking overall, because there are people at my trail, who i think arent doing things correct, and want to make sure im not the idiot here..

    Such rules like:
    -Being cautious of other bikers
    -Sharing the paths

    BTW, when should one pass another on a downhill trail? on a straight or Curve? because i had a very scary experience where one guy pushed my towards the edge of the cliff at a curve, and i thought people should pass at straights.
  • 08-23-2011
    theMeat
    I'm sure some will add to this post but just try to use common sense and treat others as you'd like to be treated. Some things I always do.
    Say hello to anyone you pass by on the trail
    If someones obviously tinkering with their bike, ask if they need help
    If someones coming down hill, at you, while your going up, move out the way so they can enjoy
    If your climbing at a slower speed than the guy coming up behind you, get out the way
    When it's safe to pass, let your intentions known, and pass.
    If it's a one way trail ah duh
    Don't park in the middle of the trail
    Don't go zooming past anyone off to the side of the trail without making eye contact and only if there's enough room to do so.
  • 08-23-2011
    Mattlikestobike
    Yea, i agree with you meat, just use common sense, but man, i wish people could just grow some common sense.. There are so many issues i face when at a trail..
  • 08-23-2011
    AndrwSwitch
    Uphill rider has the right of way.
    On most trails, horses have the right of way over everyone, and mountain bikers have the right of way over noone.

    Have a plan for if your bike breaks down. If you're riding further away from your car than you'd care to walk, you should be able to fix a flat tire, broken chain, or random thing coming out of tune. If you're riding someplace you don't know, that's big enough to get lost in, have a real, workable plan for getting un-lost. Like a map and a compass, or knowing that if you just follow the fall line, you'll end up on a MUP serving the area - something like that. There are emergency personnel for a reason, but try not to be a repeat customer.
  • 08-24-2011
    Shalom
    Rules of the Trail

    IMBA developed the "Rules of the Trail" to promote responsible and courteous conduct on shared-use trails. Keep in mind that conventions for yielding and passing may vary in different locations, or with traffic conditions.

    Ride Open Trails: Respect trail and road closures ask a land manager for clarification if you are uncertain about the status of a trail. Do not trespass on private land. Obtain permits or other authorization as required. Be aware that bicycles are not permitted in areas protected as state or federal Wilderness.
    Leave No Trace: Be sensitive to the dirt beneath you. Wet and muddy trails are more vulnerable to damage than dry ones. When the trail is soft, consider other riding options. This also means staying on existing trails and not creating new ones. Don't cut switchbacks. Be sure to pack out at least as much as you pack in.
    Control Your Bicycle: Inattention for even a moment could put yourself and others at risk. Obey all bicycle speed regulations and recommendations, and ride within your limits.
    Yield Appropriately: Do your utmost to let your fellow trail users know you're coming a friendly greeting or bell ring are good methods. Try to anticipate other trail users as you ride around corners. Bicyclists should yield to other non-motorized trail users, unless the trail is clearly signed for bike-only travel. Bicyclists traveling downhill should yield to ones headed uphill, unless the trail is clearly signed for one-way or downhill-only traffic. In general, strive to make each pass a safe and courteous one.
    Never Scare Animals: Animals are easily startled by an unannounced approach, a sudden movement or a loud noise. Give animals enough room and time to adjust to you. When passing horses, use special care and follow directions from the horseback riders (ask if uncertain). Running cattle and disturbing wildlife are serious offenses.
    Plan Ahead: Know your equipment, your ability and the area in which you are riding and prepare accordingly. Strive to be self-sufficient: keep your equipment in good repair and carry necessary supplies for changes in weather or other conditions. Always wear a helmet and appropriate safety gear.
  • 08-24-2011
    Colo Springs E
    I really slow down around hikers so as not to startle them, I also always make a point to say hi to them too. A lot of times, hikers coming my way will move off the trail to allow me/us to go through... I thank them, since they actually have the right of way.
  • 08-24-2011
    RideMore56
    Uphill rider has the right of way is one many people get confused on. Even sometimes forget myself when I am headed down hill. Harder for the downhill rider to stop but even harder for the uphill rider to get started again on a hill after stopping.
  • 08-24-2011
    square
    #1 rule... have fun!
  • 08-24-2011
    Dewaholic
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mattlikestobike View Post
    Yea, i agree with you meat, just use common sense, but man, i wish people could just grow some common sense.. There are so many issues i face when at a trail..

    Common Sense Is DEAD. and is dying more and more each day.
  • 08-24-2011
    perttime
    - be nice
    - be safe
    - do unto others...
    - you don't know what's behind the blind corner: downed tree, bear, 3 year old child...
  • 08-24-2011
    David C
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    - be nice
    - be safe
    - do unto others...
    - you don't know what's behind the blind corner: downed tree, bear, 3 year old child...

    Pedobear :D

    But also don't forget that bike have to deal with the law like car drivers have to do :

    Same road
    Same rights
    Same rules

    Yeah.

    Have fun !

    David
  • 08-24-2011
    jeffscott
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Uphill rider has the right of way.Not always
    On most trails, horses have the right of way over everyone, and mountain bikers have the right of way over noone.Unless of course horses are not allowed

    Have a plan for if your bike breaks down. If you're riding further away from your car than you'd care to walk, you should be able to fix a flat tire, broken chain, or random thing coming out of tune. If you're riding someplace you don't know, that's big enough to get lost in, have a real, workable plan for getting un-lost. Like a map and a compass, or knowing that if you just follow the fall line, you'll end up on a MUP serving the area - something like that. There are emergency personnel for a reason, but try not to be a repeat customer.

    Lots of trails around here are signed downhill rider has right of way...

    Best rule don't hurt yourself, your bike or anyone else or their bike.
  • 08-24-2011
    AGrant
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by square View Post
    #1 rule... have fun!

    #2 rule...dont be an ass! Be polite. Announce your presence to hikers, other bikers, and especially horses. DON"T startle a horse. Everyone loses on that one.

    If you are in a group that has spread out and you come upon anyone else on the trail, announce your presence and let them know how many riders are behind you so they can be expecting them.

    And remember the #1 and #2 rules above!
  • 08-24-2011
    AGrant
    Oh and one more...if you are a fast a lighting racer, then great, just don't expect everyone else on the trail to be the same. You can have just as much fun and be courteous while going slow and enjoying the ride.
  • 08-24-2011
    AndrwSwitch
    ^^^
    Even if it's a training ride - I don't think it screws up my workout to slow down and pass other users gracefully. If there are enough other users that it's truly an issue, I kick myself for choosing that trail at that time of the day/week/whatever and choose a different one the next time the timing's going to make it busy.
  • 08-24-2011
    csledd281
    If riding with a group and you're the leader and they are further behind you, if you come up on another rider going the opposite direction we always say "3 behind me" or however many more are back there, that way they know to expect more riders.

    Our trail normally gives right away to the person climbing up the hill, it looks like this is not the same every where.
  • 08-24-2011
    AZ
    Thank the people who build your trails.
  • 08-24-2011
    Canada Guy
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RideMore56 View Post
    Uphill rider has the right of way is one many people get confused on. Even sometimes forget myself when I am headed down hill. Harder for the downhill rider to stop but even harder for the uphill rider to get started again on a hill after stopping.

    All of the trail maps (printed or signed) in my neck of the woods say that the downhill rider has the right of way because like you say it is harder to stop.

    It's tough to have a hard and fast rule here because I think this one varies from area to area. In my mind common sense should prevail but we all know it doesn't always work that way. ;)
  • 08-24-2011
    t.h.
    It is a lot harder for a person going uphill to start again, esp if it is steep. I always let the uphill rider have right of way. If it is a DH-type park, this would obviously not apply, but I never ride in that setting.
  • 08-24-2011
    David C
    I think that courtesy is also a big part of the deal.

    Where I ride (Mont-Royal, Montreal, Canada), MTB are not suppose to ride anywhere other then a gravel trail, multi-user. So when I ride the old MTB trails (now use for "hikers, hoockers and junkies"), I always yield the way to anyone that is not riding a bike.

    Next thing you know, people will then yield the way to you by their own next time you meet and everybody will be happy and enjoying the place.

    The worst thing to do is to get a bad start at this. Because no one will enjoy it.

    David
  • 08-24-2011
    Thalamos
    1. Leave the trail like you found it.
    2. Always yield the right of way to the other rider.
    3. Greett all those you encounter.
    4. Always ask to pass.
    5. Make your presence know to others on the trail. I usually yell "Rider Up!"
    6. Don't tamper with the critters.
    7. Don't ride muddy trails. (Doesn't count just muddy spots and yeah, I know its fun though.)
    8. Make sure that your to the side of the trail if you have to stop. (Encountered many that stand in the middle of the trail while just visiting with one another.)

    Those are some of the main rules that I follow. But, common sense is a very useful tool.

    Thal
  • 08-24-2011
    Eckstream1
    Don't lock your brakes and drag a wheel!

    I see so many skid marks on the local trails... It's only a matter of time before the trail gets all rutted up!
  • 08-24-2011
    raleigh5
    just curious: is there any legit reason why a hiker should be moving off a narrow trail or coming to a halt to allow bikers to pass by? when on trails where it is posted that bikers are at the bottom of the pecking order, i think they gotta get off the bike and give way to the hiker. i am talking only those trails that lack the width to allow comfortable 2-wide traffic. just the other day my daughter and i hiked mostly single track bayview(?) trail at China Camp in Marin County .the mountain biking clinic group was there with maybe 3 instructors and 10 - 12 young kids....this entire group passed us going in the opposite direction on the narrow trail....not a single 1 of them even began to come to a stop/dismount. not even the instructors. though i did hear one instructing his buddy to 'slow down' as they approached us. nor did any of the other 12 or so grown up bikers riding that trail. now really, it wasn't really an issue to me. BUT, if i every trail i hiked was like that every time that i hiked...i'd be very unhappy. i doubt i'll ever hike china camp again on a nice day.
  • 08-25-2011
    jacklikesbeans
    Rule 17: If you catch a man peeing in the woods promptly call him a "jackwagon"
    Rule 18: If you witness someone riding nude immediately call the police and hit them with a branch
  • 08-25-2011
    AndrwSwitch
    I think a hiker should let mountain bikers by for the same reason a hiker should let faster hikers or trail runners by.

    I don't think either party should be rude about it, though. When people are polite and pass in safe spots and are courteous about it, it's better for everyone.
  • 08-25-2011
    Gasp4Air
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I think a hiker should let mountain bikers by for the same reason a hiker should let faster hikers or trail runners by.

    I don't think either party should be rude about it, though. When people are polite and pass in safe spots and are courteous about it, it's better for everyone.

    Agree. [Rant begin] Bikers should slow down when passing hikers, especially in close quarters. Hiker's give me room if I slow down to walking pace and give them ample time to react. I do not expect them to jump out of the way. Sometimes, depending on the situation, I'll stop and let them pass me. Who's to say it's up to them to get out of our way? When approaching from behind, I announce myself say "Hi up ahead, can I get by you". I am a hiker also, and a rude biker who expects me to jump aside so he doesn't have to slow down will not get my cooperation. [Rant end]

    Yield to uphill riders - although there are exceptions, like when the down hill rider is negotiating something really technical and stopping would be difficult.

    Say thanks when yielded to by a another rider.

    SLOW DOWN on blind curves. On mixed use trails, you just don't know what's around a blind curve. Out-riding your ability to stop is just plain dangerous to others. Most riders are fairly responsible in my experience. Some are not, and put their fun ahead of others' safety. How many threads have we seen about the dog/kid/rider that didn't get out the way fast enough and "caused" a crash?.

    Stay on the trail. Don't create braids.

    Lot's of other good things have been mentioned by others. Be responsible, have fun!
  • 08-25-2011
    mimi1885
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    Thank the people who build your trails.

    I agree, I ran into a few volunteers doing some maintenance I stopped and chat with them thanking them for their work, they were on the way out if not I'd buy them iced cold beer:thumbsup:

    Oh rules of MTBing.

    If/when you run over horse pie or cow pie (it happens) with your front wheel, close your mouth, regardless of how pissed off you are that you running over them. :D
  • 08-25-2011
    STT GUY
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    HELP the people who build your trails.


    Fixed.:thumbsup: