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  1. #1
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    Riding back in the saddle, does that mean frame is too small

    I have a 07 Redline 26" Monocog size 17" I find myself riding on the back end of the sadle most of the time. I am 5'11" and have already switched to a longer stem. Any thoughts?
    Last edited by 2canSAM; 03-19-2008 at 03:09 PM.

  2. #2
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    I am 5-11 and ride a 19 inch frame...I have short legs.

    My bike is know to have a relatively short cockpit...

    I went to a longer stem 120mm, with a set back seatpost, and the saddle is almost all the way to the rear on the rails.

    I also rolled the handlebars forward a little bit.

  3. #3
    I love Pisgah
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    I am 5-11 and ride a 19 inch frame...I have short legs.

    My bike is know to have a relatively short cockpit...

    I went to a longer stem 120mm, with a set back seatpost, and the saddle is almost all the way to the rear on the rails.

    I also rolled the handlebars forward a little bit.
    +1.

    5'-11.5" and a 19-19.5" is optimal for me. Even then I run lots of post, and 2 bikes have 120mm stems. I've raced/ridden a 20.5" as well.

    17" should be way small for the average 5-11" rider.
    "I've breathed the mtn air, man" Johnny Cash

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    . . . if you wanna rock and roll (ac/dc)

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2canSAM
    I have a 07 Redline 26" Monocog size 17' I find myself riding on the back end of the sadle most of the time. I am 5'11" and have already switched to a longer stem. Any thoughts?
    How do you even get on a 17 foot tall mtb?

  5. #5
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    I'm 5' 8" and I ride a 17", so a 19" would be about right for you.

  6. #6
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    laid back seat post....may I ask how you got yourself in this situation? If you still don't have enough room with a laid back post then there's no hope and you'll need a larger frame
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod
    laid back seat post....may I ask how you got yourself in this situation? If you still don't have enough room with a laid back post then there's no hope and you'll need a larger frame

    Had an 17" Specialized that I bought from the LBS. The guys there sized me up for it and ran me through a bunch of sizing test. They originally had me on a 19" Rockhopper, after a few weeks I went back to the lbs and talked about being too stretched out and they dropped me to a 17" When I got rid of that frame I went with the same size in the monocog. Thinking back though I rode back in the sadle on the Rockhopper. I just never rode enough to realize this was a fit issue. Any body want a 2007 Mononcog 17", near perfect frame for cheap?

  8. #8
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    Thats weird...I too am 5 11 and I ride on a 17.5, I have noticed no comfort issues and the folks at the LBS i went to said it was a decent fit

    Did they rip me off?
    Lean back, Hit both brakes, And ask yourself, Do you feel lucky today?

  9. #9
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    I'm also 5'11" and on a 17.5" bike. I tried the 19.5 and it was a bit more comfortable but I like the way the 17.5 handles and its not UNcomfortable so heh. I ride with a 90mm stem and and I believe about 13mm setback with the seat mounted almost as far back on the rails as it can go. Much of it depends on your riding style and small tweaks can make big differences.

  10. #10
    Newbie in japan
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    5'11 here as well on a 17" specialized

    no problems

  11. #11
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    Bike sizing depends alot on more than just height alone. Are you long legged, long torso'd etc etc. Also frame sizes vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. I companys 19 might be the same as another companys 17 so on and so forth.
    Top tube length is the most important factor in sizing imo.
    If your bike ain't fitting right, bring it back to the shop and see if they will work something out. Like others mentioned, small tweaks make a big difference if done right. Not just stem length but also rise....and the sweep of the bars.
    Offset of the seatpost can help alot too.....also find a saddle with longer rails......that'll get it back even further.
    I personally have to sacrafice standover to get a long enough top tube. I'm 6'4" and long torso'd.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  12. #12
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    I have my saddle slid all the way back on my 17.5" bike. I am 5.7" and I don't think it has anything to do with the top tube. It has more to do with my foot position in relation to the seat. The reason I want to slide back is cause of my legs, not my arm reach. Make sense to anyone?

  13. #13
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    Back when my saddle wasn't high enough, I had the saddle positioned almost over the rear hub. This caused all kinds of knee problems.
    In the end I had to move my seat higher and further forward.
    Quote Originally Posted by tom2304
    Yep farkin.net is mostly immature kids asking how to put dual crown forks on hardtails and such.

  14. #14
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    They say when you hang a weighted string from just below your kneecap it should be in line with the pedal spindle. I have not yet experimented to see if this changes much by adjusting seat height. Your seat height should be set to where your leg is nearly fully extended when your heel is on the pedal. I would think foot size would have a lot to do with the fore and aft position of the seat. Do all tall ppl have big feet?

  15. #15
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    It's funny. I read that article in MBA about finding your inseam using the book method, then adjusting the seat position by the dangling weight from knee to pedal deal.....so naturally I had to try it.

    Well, I guess my bike was setup perfectly because after finding my inseam my seat was already at perfect height, and when I dangled the weight it was touching the pedal axel.....hehe

    I am 6'4" and wear a 15 wide shoe.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  16. #16
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  17. #17
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    There's what is "technically" right, and what "feels" right.

    For instance, I like my mountain bikes a little on the small side. I'm nearly 6', but ride a medium Motolite. I probably could have went to a large, but had difficulty getting behind the saddle on the large because I have short legs for my height (31" inseam; yes, I'm built like a midget). Maneuverability in the cockpit is more important to me than being stretched out. I think that sort of "by-the-book fit" is more valuable to roadies than a mountain bike.

    If the cockpit feels cramped, your frame might be a little small. You could try a longer stem and laid back seatpost... that might fix your problem.

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