Retro bikes- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Retro bikes

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    3

    Retro bikes

    Hi all, I'm looking at getting me self a retro bike from back in my teen years. I used to have a trek y33 with Judy dho's, hope bigun hubs and disc, Chris King, middleburn rs3 chainset etc etc. I haven't rode a bike now for 20 years. I was wondering what people's opinions would be on buying one 20+ years old, also am considering a klein mantra pro but would want one with the klein forks. I don't want to buy a new bike as I don't believe there's much difference in todays new bikes except for really expensive ones with the digital gears ie Xtr groupset. I only want to spend between £1000 and £1500. Looks are important.

    Sent from my G3121 using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Evolutionsverlierer
    Reputation: acer66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,017
    The current suspension technology is lightyears ahead of what was cutting edge 20 years ago to put it mildly.

    The only reason imho to buy something that old is as novelty, sentimental reasons or to show it off.
    I have my first mid nineties full suspension hanging in the shed because there is no resell value and I have plans to fix it, haha, at one point.
    Then there is getting suspension parts etc..
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Avid is spelled wrong, there should be an 'O' in there.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    13,577
    If you're into how you look rather than having the most fun on your trails- - - - go for it.
    After you spend some time getting back in shape and building confidence you'll quickly get to the same point again that caused you to want those bikes back in the day. Pure Performance.
    Then demo a current bike.

    You'll find you're completely in error about what you get from less than XTR level components today. GX and SLX individual components and some lesser forks are plenty capable.
    Two things you'll have to experience to realize the progress that's happened-
    Geo with slack head tube angles and steep seat tube angles.
    Wide 30mm inner width rim wheels and 2.5+ tires at lower pressures.
    add in wide bars and powerful brakes for more ride control.

    Your 'old' bike will make great garage wall art.

    https://www.trailforks.com/region/broxbourne-woods/
    https://www.trailforks.com/region/epping-forest/trails/

  4. #4
    mbtr member
    Reputation: scottzg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,494
    Quote Originally Posted by D4EWW View Post
    I don't want to buy a new bike as I don't believe there's much difference in todays new bikes except for really expensive ones with the digital gears ie Xtr groupset.
    That's absurd. 70% of mtb advancement has happened since you quit, and the design priorities have practically reversed.

    If you want to ride something from the bad-old-days for novelty value or just to cruise around on dirt roads... go for it! They're still the best for that. But don't think you're getting something equivalent to something modern. A half-decent modern hardtail outperforms most any 20 year old mtb.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,548
    Quote Originally Posted by D4EWW View Post
    I used to have a trek y33... I was wondering what people's opinions would be on buying one..., also am considering a klein mantra pro...
    Maybe eye-candy to some back in the day, but both are often put on "worst" lists.

    So for nostalgia cruising, sure. But for real suspension performance, look elsewhere.
    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3,385
    If Trek thought those designs worked well ,they would still be making them. You do yourself a favor and go test ride a new bike ,in the dirt if you can. Saying this as someone who still has bikes from the late 80's ,but also has one from around 2013 .Guess which one gets ridden.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    3
    Oops looked like I touched a few nerves..... I consider myself told of and never to say something as stupid as that again . I did start looking at the proflex with the girvin fork, thats probably worse....Which bikes would you consider at the £1300 range. Cheers ppl

    Sent from my G3121 using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    mbtr member
    Reputation: scottzg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,494
    Quote Originally Posted by D4EWW View Post
    Oops looked like I touched a few nerves..... I consider myself told of and never to say something as stupid as that again . I did start looking at the proflex with the girvin fork, thats probably worse....Which bikes would you consider at the £1300 range. Cheers ppl

    Sent from my G3121 using Tapatalk
    You didn't touch any nerves. Most of us have been riding for 20+ years and know what's up. Clueless born-again mtbr members aren't as rare as you imagine.

    Whereas in the bad-old-days there was only a few good bikes at a given price point, now there's lots. It makes it harder for outsiders to identify a sweet whip, but there's a lot more cool used bikes on the market.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3,385
    We wasn't trying to make you think you are stupid or anything else. We are taking the time to try and educate you on how bikes have changed. You can gain a lot of knowledge here asking questions. In general we try stop people from making the same mistakes that we made when we were new .

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    3
    I think though I would still like to go the retro way, as I'm never going to race/compete it is more just for fun maybe down river banks and there's a nice place called high beach in Epping forest, use to go there every week back in the day.
    But I do wonder what parts would be like to get.
    I do appreciate your responses as your the ones in the know.

    Do the front and rear mechs still fit to the frame in the same way and the rear cassette or would I have to buy a new hub as well.
    Also what's all this different wheel sizes. 26" use to be the norm, now I read 650b 27.5" 29"

    Things have changed I agree


    Sent from my G3121 using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    13,577
    It's not about racing for many riders. Maybe for fun unless you train for it. Or with riding buddies.
    It is about competing against the terrain. About using the bike's capability to have fun without crashing. Bikes have reached a level where you can push and develop your skills in a safe controlled way. Because the bikes are better than most guys can use.

    Pick a 29 hardtail with an air fork, Boost hubs and space for 2.5 tires. Nukeproof Scout Race 29 from CRC. Get on the email notification list for restocks.
    https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/.../rp-prod183330

    A bit better is a Spec Fuse Comp 29.
    https://www.specialized.com/gb/en/fu...=263308-171069
    Call around for stock.

    More than your budget.-
    Santa Cruz Chameleon | Santa Cruz Bikes UK
    You may be able to try it at a demo event. Some are scheduled. Bring a helmet and wear trainers for using platform pedals. Keep your heels low and get off the seat when you go over bumps and you won't be bounced off.
    I strongly suggest you go to free demos to try the different types of bikes. Even if you don't think you'll buy that model. You can try different components and see what you prefer to put on your bike later.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugpQF4VIZQA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeSAgIQXen8

  12. #12
    ●●●●●●●●◌◌
    Reputation: phlegm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,380
    Quote Originally Posted by D4EWW View Post
    ...
    Do the front and rear mechs still fit to the frame in the same way and the rear cassette or would I have to buy a new hub as well.
    Also what's all this different wheel sizes. 26" use to be the norm, now I read 650b 27.5" 29"

    ...
    Re the mechs, are you asking if you can retrofit your old bike?

    Yes, 26" wheels are effectively dead these days. Also, front derailleurs are gradually heading that way as well.

  13. #13
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,300
    Ride what you like.

    10 years ago, I put together a bike that surely consisted of mismatched parts even then. I love that bike. It beats me up, but at least it is me and not technology that gets it over the bumps.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    590
    OK, I looks like you're serious and not trolling.
    You picked some of the considered worst DS bikes from back in the day. I can tell you definitely, as others have said, FS is way better now than the noodle bikes of those days.
    Yes, I've been riding since the 80's. Yes, the bike I ride now is a high zoot expensive Yeti, but the technology has trickled down. There are many more affordable bikes which perform quite well also.
    If you're wanting an old FS, i'd look for a 4 bar linkage design, those worked better.
    If you're wanting nice vintage ride look for hardtails, those are pretty timeless.
    The difficulty you're going to find is parts. For vintage rides most parts will need to search vintage sources. Its not impossible, but its not like you can go to local bike shop or hop online mega bike retailer and find parts.
    26" tires you can still find a fair but limited selection. Drivetrain will be low end parts, if any. Brakes likewise, only V's you see are on low/entry level bikes and most shops won't stock them for aftermarket sales. Ask their service department and they might have some in stock. You won't find any decent forks new.
    If you want to rock the vintage rides, by all means. It's not impossible, just be aware that it takes some work and commitment. I still used to occasionally ride my '92 Fat Chance. I do not or ever envision riding my Schwinn Straight Six ever again. I actually now thank the homeless @ss who stole my Ellsworth that led to me buying my first yet SB. That Ellsworth was decked out in some high end stuff, but losing that the replacement was a sudden great jump in tech. But if you're not riding hard on trails, then vintage can work fine.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    1
    My fav always

  16. #16
    Sneaker man
    Reputation: mik_git's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,252
    I love retro bikes and they can be a lot of fun to ride, but they are in no way as good as a current bike...depends on what you want to do with them. I still occasionally race my old bike from 1996...but only on the easy courses.
    All the gear and no idea.

Similar Threads

  1. Retro MTB attire for my retro MTB video
    By Y_two_K in forum Apparel and Protection
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-05-2020, 07:25 PM
  2. Retro...as in actual retro
    By mik_git in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-19-2017, 06:39 AM
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-18-2011, 08:44 PM
  4. Replies: 27
    Last Post: 07-16-2007, 06:57 AM
  5. Retro picts of retro riders on retro bikes?
    By Steve-O in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 08-17-2004, 01:25 PM

Members who have read this thread: 40

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.