Removing rear wheel plastic pie plate- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 43 of 43
  1. #1
    Wheeeee!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    72

    Removing rear wheel plastic pie plate

    You know, the thing in between the freewheel and the hub. Its not necessary is it? How do I take it off?

    Jamis Dakota '06
    Jamis Sputnik '10

    We're all wrong.

    2 meters tall. 13.37 Stone. Yeah, I'm a freak of nature.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    205
    Easiest way is to remove the wheel and then remove the cassette/freewheel with the appropriate tool. you should be able to just lift it off.

    Alternative. Use Diagonal cutters to cut the disk into a couple of pieces!!

  3. #3
    a.k.a Slacker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    535
    I don't think it's that bad to have it in place, I've had occasions where when a chain suck occured, I wished I had that there. But if yours is a singlespeed, you probably don't have to worry about that.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,534
    I'd rip that thing off, looks as bad as reflectors.
    Vermonter - bikes, beers and skis.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    549
    The plastic is usually brittle...you could break it off if you don't have the tools to remove the cassette/freewheel, and don't mind destroying the guard...

  6. #6

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    44
    just snap it off, or cut it. whateverworks kuz u probably wont ever need it again

  7. #7
    Wheeeee!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    72
    Snapped it off. Looks much better now. The chain shouldn't get stuck in there as long as I've got my derailleur adjusted properly.
    Jamis Dakota '06
    Jamis Sputnik '10

    We're all wrong.

    2 meters tall. 13.37 Stone. Yeah, I'm a freak of nature.

  8. #8
    SSolo, on your left!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,577
    Quote Originally Posted by OhSchitt
    I don't think it's that bad to have it in place, I've had occasions where when a chain suck occured, I wished I had that there. ....
    Been glad mine was there on a couple of occasions, I'd leave it on just in case.
    Get off the couch and ride! :)

  9. #9

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    50
    i once had a problem where it stopped my freewheel from freewheeling and resulted in my chain and derallieur going everywhere! i'd reccomend taking it off.
    _________________________
    for tips on mountian bike training, skills and tech visithttp://ultimatemountainbike.blogspot.com

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: liam2051's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    849
    has anyone ever tried the snap method on a new giant?

    when i was out on my old talon in the middle of the bush no tools what so ever (other than tyre levers and my leather-man type tool [surprisingly long cutters BTW] ) and the plastic disc came free from the spokes and wouldnt re attach so was making the most annoying rattle ive ever heard so i decided to rip her off....... after mutating the top of it realizing it was bulletproof but mangling it so it would no longer allow clearance of the cassette i spent two hours cutting it and getting burnt in the queensland sun. seriously not fun

  11. #11
    Wheeeee!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    72
    Ok, well I didn't quite snap it off liam, I spent 20 minutes with a knife scoring the plasctic through the spokes and the using all my strength tearing it off. I'd recommend just taking the cassette off, its easy as hell you just need the right tools, which your LBS definitely has.
    Jamis Dakota '06
    Jamis Sputnik '10

    We're all wrong.

    2 meters tall. 13.37 Stone. Yeah, I'm a freak of nature.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    499
    take it off, spoke guards are noob.
    2018 Santa Cruz Tallboy
    Southern Maine

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: liam2051's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    849
    Quote Originally Posted by NameTaken
    Ok, well I didn't quite snap it off liam, I spent 20 minutes with a knife scoring the plasctic through the spokes and the using all my strength tearing it off. I'd recommend just taking the cassette off, its easy as hell you just need the right tools, which your LBS definitely has.
    when your twenty ks into the aussie bush there isnt much chance of hitting up the local bike shop to get some parts is there? i actualy work in my LBS so i should have removed it earlier oh well

  14. #14
    ...idios...
    Reputation: SteveUK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    5,662
    The guard is protect the wheel should the chain be derailled over the largest cassette sprocket. If the low gear limit screw is correctly set, the chain can not be pushed over the top of the cassette and into the spokes. So, remove the 'noob' guard, by all means, just ensure that your mech is set up first...

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  15. #15
    beautiful jackass
    Reputation: one incredible donkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    628
    I've apparently had one on my bike for over 4 years. It's a pretty stupid thing to be concerned about removing.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Stelth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    114
    Dremel it off.

  17. #17
    SSolo, on your left!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,577
    Quote Originally Posted by Ironchefjon
    take it off, spoke guards are noob.
    Changed my mind and now agree with Ironchefjon..............take it off....properly adjusted derailleur don't need that crap.
    Get off the couch and ride! :)

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,062
    More often than not, they'll come loose on their own and become a major PIA. Much better to be proactive and just remove it before it becomes a problem.

  19. #19
    SSolo, on your left!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,577
    Yep and sometimes noisy too.
    Get off the couch and ride! :)

  20. #20
    SSolo, on your left!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,577
    Cut it off my second bike from day one and both bikes are fine without them!
    Get off the couch and ride! :)

  21. #21
    iRonic
    Reputation: GlassTrain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    304
    Do bike shops usually stock these things?

    My Stumpjumper had one, but it was all brownish looking and started coming apart. Had no choice but to take it completely off.

    I miss my spoke guard!

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SycoCell121's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    354
    Take it off, then burn it.

  23. #23

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    31
    I guess even if the chain comes off, it is on the low speed side of the cassette, you would be going like 2 mph... how much can you harm? am I right?

  24. #24
    ...idios...
    Reputation: SteveUK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    5,662
    "I guess even if the chain comes off, it is on the low speed side of the cassette, you would be going like 2 mph... how much can you harm? am I right?"

    If the chain gets jammed between the cassette and the spokes, there is a chance that either a) the chain is going to damage the spokes, or b) the derailleur is going to get dragged into the spokes.

    Having a completely inflexible and unyielding chain pressed against a set of rotating spokes at 2mph is going to cause damage. It may not be terminal, but do it enough times and eventually the spokes will be worn away to the point that they'll fracture. This kind of damage can easily be missed as it will be hidden somewhat by the cassette. Take a look at the picture in this post for an example).

    Having a derailleur wedged into a moving wheel, even at 2mph, is likely to cause considerable damage to either the wheel/spokes, the deraiileur or the derailleur hanger, perhaps even the frame. It's not only the speed of the bike to consider, there's also the amount of force being applied at the pedals.

    I honestly have no idea why the pie plate is met with such scorn. Yes, is looks a little ugly and has become associated with 'noobs', but I'll bet there are countless riders who have their pie plate to thank for not having to buy a new wheel. People seem to reach a point and think that they're now experienced riders who don't need the guard, or that by removing it they look more experienced or serious, so off it comes. An experienced rider they may be, but it's incredible how many experienced riders know precious little about how to set up their derailleur.

    The pie plate should be an indicator of mechanical aptitude. A derailleur will not jump the chain over the top of the cassette when the limits are correctly set. Only a collision to the derailleur can force the chain off, in which case the pie plate is more or less useless anyway; the pie plate will not prevent the derailleur cage from entering the spokes.
    Last edited by SteveUK; 02-19-2009 at 08:44 AM.

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SycoCell121's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    354
    I've had it happen, going fast. It doesn't really do anything besides lock your rear tire. So no worries. Just adjust your RD so the chain is lined up well.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: js_paddle07's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    243
    I crashed and it ended up cracking. Scissors wouldn't cut it, so I grabbed some pliers and basically ripped it off. It was a pain.I probably would have left it had it not cracked. Those things may be noob, but I am a noob with a noob Hardrock.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    9
    I had a stick jump up and into my drivetrain last weekend. After that happened, if I spun the real wheel by hand it would slow down very quick. My first thought was the disc brakes got out of alignment and were rubbing, but that wasn't it. The pie plate got bent by the stick and was rubbing on the cassette as it turned. I cut it up, removed it and the problem went away.

  28. #28
    Gravity's Gone
    Reputation: nankerphelge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,384
    Cut it, tear it off, remove the cassette and take it off. Whichever. Real men (or women) don't use pie plates.

  29. #29

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    31
    On my Giant I took needle nose pliers and started twisting and bitting the edge to break it. Then lit some matches to melt the plastic and kept working my way with the pliers until I made a complete cut to the center. Then I rotated the wheel 180 degrees and did it again, then simply snap off the plastic prongs witht the pliers and remove the two halves.

    Took 10 minutes.

  30. #30

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    33
    steveuk's comments are right on the money.If the thing is damaged then remove it, otherwise leave it intact so it can afford a little insurance against the chain and derailleur from getting wound up in your wheel.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    876

    It's a test

    If you don't have a chain whip or know what one is (or have a buddy you can scrounge his from), you're supposed to leave it on, because you're probably not an experienced enough mech to setup your RD properly.

    I can't believe all the people recommending dremmelling or cutting it off. You guys know the spokes are right there, right?

  32. #32
    Rabid Lana Fan
    Reputation: net wurker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    8,891
    I removed mine.

    I would have liked to keep the protection to the spokes it provides, however, I had a piece of pie at the time and I needed a place to put it.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,062
    The plastic pie plate on the rear wheel is not designed to last up a short hill anyway. Remove it now, or remove it after the first few miles when it starts to fall off. I just removed mine from my brand new bike, as it started rubbing and making noise after the first few rides. And it would no longer attach reliably to the spokes. I used a pair of diagonal cutters. It was a bit of a wrestling match, but it was in the trash where it belongs in about 5-10 minutes.

    The same has happened to every bike I've owned.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: antgrave's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    145
    take the noob dish off...

    i messed up my hub taking mine off though...its a real pain anyway you do it...looking back on it, it wasn't such a bad thing...looks a little weak but whatever really.
    cas im diggin a ditch where madness gives a bit.

  35. #35
    i also unicycle
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,043
    it's super easy if you have cassette removal tools. pop the cassette off, pull of pie plate, reinstall cassette. hell, if you brought just the wheel into my shop, i'd do it for you for free on the spot. pie plates are ugly and unnecessary.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

  36. #36

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    68
    I had one come loose miles into the middle of nowhere. It stopped the rear wheel freewheeling and caused the rear mech to come slowly up and say a catastrophic hello to the rest of the drive train. Neither me nor my mate had a knife so had to spend an hour or so whittling the god forsaken thing off with a sharp edged stone. The chain subsequently snapped later in the ride, presumably due to the trauma of the strange pointless plastic disc.

    Take it off, it's ****.

  37. #37
    Blind biker
    Reputation: harry2110's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by Natedogz
    Changed my mind and now agree with Ironchefjon..............take it off....properly adjusted derailleur don't need that crap.
    But it has saved me when I bent my derailur hanger and didnt know it till i cam upon a hill and heard the scraping.

  38. #38
    Probably drunk right now
    Reputation: Ken in KC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,750

    Okay...

    Quote Originally Posted by harry2110
    But it has saved me when I bent my derailur hanger and didnt know it till i cam upon a hill and heard the scraping.

    Saved you from what? Taking one pedal stroke before you couldn't pedal?

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NoobHill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    99
    Just wanted to add that my pie plate started F'ing up my freewheel as soon as I got my bike. Somehow it had come loose and got wedged in there. I didn't have the tools back then and had to take it to a bike shop to get the thing removed. Get that noob stuff outta there, lol.

  40. #40
    Nervous Descender
    Reputation: Adirondack Blues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    717
    For the love of God, people- if you must remove the dork disc go buy a chain whip and the correct cassette lockring tool. Not expensive and you're gonna need all these tools eventually anyway, unless you like constantly taking your bike to the shop. Get the right tools and use them!
    Check out some of our local hills: CDRC (Capital District Road Climbs)

  41. #41
    thread killer
    Reputation: WTF-IDK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    757
    My new outlaw wheels didn't come with a pie plate.
    should I take it to the LBS and have one put on?


    just kidding. I'm not going to put one on a $4000.00 bike.
    next time

    [QUOTE=spazzy] Might as well sell your bikes, E-riding is much more productive.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WindWithMe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    228
    Quote Originally Posted by Adirondack Blues
    For the love of God, people- if you must remove the dork disc go buy a chain whip and the correct cassette lockring tool. Not expensive and you're gonna need all these tools eventually anyway, unless you like constantly taking your bike to the shop. Get the right tools and use them!
    AMEN.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vk45de's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,083
    are you kidding me? my LBS doesn't even carry those pie plates! i found out when mine got brittle and broke off and i went to find a replacement

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.