Recommend clipless for a Beginner?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 29 of 29
  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    168

    New question here. Recommend clipless for a Beginner?

    Can any one recomend some good intro clipless pedals that are not alot of money. I am still deciding if its a road i really want to take with the amount of experience i have. I am starting to feel comfortable when riding over more techincal areas and i find as my skill level is increasing as well as my speed. This in turn has my feet bouncing off my platforms on real rugged stuff. I would also like to have them for climbing. But back to the question - good durable and afforable clipless

    One more question - Any good recomendations on saddles? rear end hurts after long rides

  2. #2

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    55

    Idea!

    Quote Originally Posted by WeekendShogunWarrior
    Can any one recomend some good intro clipless pedals that are not alot of money. I am still deciding if its a road i really want to take with the amount of experience i have. I am starting to feel comfortable when riding over more techincal areas and i find as my skill level is increasing as well as my speed. This in turn has my feet bouncing off my platforms on real rugged stuff. I would also like to have them for climbing. But back to the question - good durable and afforable clipless

    One more question - Any good recomendations on saddles? rear end hurts after long rides
    Shimano 515s came on my bike and I believe they are supposed to be entry level. I've heard a bit about Wellgo clipless pedals. I think Nashbar has those. As far a buying a new saddle, try a gel seat cover. That may be sufficient. I have one over my Body Geometry saddle and it works for me.

    HTH

  3. #3

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    327
    Why don't you try and get toe clips for your platforms if you aren't sold on clipless?
    As for your original question, try the Performance Team pedals. When I first went clipless I picked these up for under $30. They were easy to adjust and had a decent engagement. No matter what clipless pedal you get make sure you start out with the tension pretty loose, but not loose enough so that the tension screw comes out or your foot comes out while you are pedaling.

  4. #4

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by StormShadow
    Why don't you try and get toe clips for your platforms if you aren't sold on clipless?
    As for your original question, try the Performance Team pedals. When I first went clipless I picked these up for under $30. They were easy to adjust and had a decent engagement. No matter what clipless pedal you get make sure you start out with the tension pretty loose, but not loose enough so that the tension screw comes out or your foot comes out while you are pedaling.
    Good point. I'd recommend strapless toe clips.

  5. #5

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    168
    Quote Originally Posted by StormShadow
    Why don't you try and get toe clips for your platforms if you aren't sold on clipless?
    As for your original question, try the Performance Team pedals. When I first went clipless I picked these up for under $30. They were easy to adjust and had a decent engagement. No matter what clipless pedal you get make sure you start out with the tension pretty loose, but not loose enough so that the tension screw comes out or your foot comes out while you are pedaling.
    Just about anybody i talk to, or almost anything i have read has told me just to bypass toe clips becuase eventually i am going to get clipless. I went down to my local REI and they had some good deals. They guys there helped me alot. What i think i am going to do is ride this season without toe clips for a little while and get better on my techincal riding then invest in them. That way atleast ill feel comfortable being locked in

  6. #6
    Derailleurless
    Reputation: Speedub.Nate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    9,122
    Quote Originally Posted by WeekendShogunWarrior
    But back to the question - good durable and afforable clipless
    Shimano's current breed of SPD pedals -- the 520, 540, and 959 -- are the best they've made in years. In fact, the 520's, at around $30-40 and only a 50g weight penalty to the $100+ 959's, are Shimano's <b>first good</b> (if not great) entry level clipless pedal.

    The key to a safe and happy learing process is easy entry and exit, and the 520's deliver. I'd look no further than these bargins. I ride a pair of these as well as a pair of old-school 535's (Shimano's last great pedal from the mid-90's) and a junky pair of 324's (basically half a 515 but with a platform), and the 520's equal the smoothness of the 535's. Hopefully they'll last me as long, too.

    As for your saddle question, everyone's butt is different, but try out a Terry Fly and a WTB Rocket V. Some shops will be happy to mount a saddle up to one of their bikes and let you take it around the block.

  7. #7
    inner peace to make peace
    Reputation: TrailNut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,288

    Time Aliums

    Time Aliums, about $60 from the Internet.
    works great in all weather.
    does not release too early like SPDs (hated that during tough climbs).
    easy to "clip" back in (SPDs were hard to clip back in while going down on fast switchbacks).
    like the bit of support for jumps.
    i own three sets of these.

  8. #8

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    26

    Straight to clipless

    You know, toes clips aren't a right of passage to clipless. If you want to go straight to clipless, do it up. I personally think toe clips are dangerous because I know a couple of people who broke ankles because their feet were basically tied to the pedals, and when they fell their feet couldn't move with their body.

    That plus, once you get your technique down, you will have better power and efficiency with clipless. But practice practice practice before you hit anything hard.

  9. #9
    Gravity Rides Everything
    Reputation: endurowanker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,126
    Try and find some Time ATAC aliums on sale. You can often find them for like 50-60 bucks if you look around. They blow Shimano compatibles out of the water. MUCH better in the mud, simple durable design. Really the only way to go in my opinion (though I haven't tried egg beaters, but those are more expensive anyway)

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: triscuit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    391
    Quote Originally Posted by WeekendShogunWarrior
    Can any one recomend some good intro clipless pedals that are not alot of money. I am still deciding if its a road i really want to take with the amount of experience i have. I am starting to feel comfortable when riding over more techincal areas and i find as my skill level is increasing as well as my speed. This in turn has my feet bouncing off my platforms on real rugged stuff. I would also like to have them for climbing. But back to the question - good durable and afforable clipless

    One more question - Any good recomendations on saddles? rear end hurts after long rides
    I purchased some cheap Performance Forte Team pedals for my first set, very cheap, about $20-25 on sale. They were good to learn, just because I didn't spend much money, but the tension bolts fall out really easily. After two pairs of those (I still use one set on my commuter, and another set for parts), I picked up a new pair of Shimano pedals, still SPD, so same shoes, same cleats. They cost a little more, but still under $50, and they are much more durable.

    I like that these are adjustable, even though they do not shed mud as well as some. I keep them on the loosest setting, just because I don't even have to think about it now and my feet come out when I want to put a foot down. Also, I went clipless pretty quickly into my mtb career and I just practiced getting in and out of the pedals a lot before I ever rode on the trails (leaning up against a chair while watching tv, clip in and out, in and out, over and over again) and by the time I got on the trail, sure I fell over some, but it wasn't too bad. And it was a lot easier to climb, and clear stuff with them.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wango55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    73
    I just got my first set of clipless (Crank Bros. Mallet C's), and so far they've worked out pretty well. I like how the platform is there, just because it gives me a "Security blanket" kind of effect if I'm having problems clipping in. As a beginner I would reccomend them. I haven't really done anything too crazy, just practicing clipping in and out, and riding around the streets in my neighborhood a lot just to get used to them. I'd like to feel comfortable before hitting any more technical trails or anything. I did have my first fall yesterday, a car was coming, and I was trying to slow down and stop before hitting it, and couldn't clip out. Needless to say I just fell over. I guess it just comes with the territory I guess.

    Sort of off topic, but I think the answer to this might help other newbs out as well:
    My pedals came with shims for the cleat, so effectively I can raise and lower the cleat on my shoe. I currently have one shim under the cleat, and when I walk around, the cleat itself is making some contact with the ground. Does this mean that I have the cleat set too high, and is this bad for the cleat?
    It's a long way to the top, if you wanna rock n' roll...

  12. #12
    Code Burr
    Reputation: thebronze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,376
    Quote Originally Posted by wango55
    Sort of off topic, but I think the answer to this might help other newbs out as well:
    My pedals came with shims for the cleat, so effectively I can raise and lower the cleat on my shoe. I currently have one shim under the cleat, and when I walk around, the cleat itself is making some contact with the ground. Does this mean that I have the cleat set too high, and is this bad for the cleat?
    The shims are for shoes that have a deep tread and have trouble contacting the cleat.
    Take one of your shoes and try to mount it by hand onto the pedal, if it looks like the tread is blocking the cleat use the shims...might also need to trim some of the tread off with a razor blade.

  13. #13
    Lookin for that extra can
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    214
    I'd say go with the safest gear you can afford and try to save money somewhere else. I don't believe that going with a cheap clipless is a good way to start. Sure pretty much all clipless pedals will help you generate a more powerful pedal stroke, but what makes some better than others is ease of clipping in/out, release reliability, and degrees of float. If you are going to ride, you are going to fall. It really sucks when you get injured because you didn't release from your pedals, or released when you weren't supposed to. Another thing to think about is the degree of float can really help you avoid knee issues down the road. So, for my $$ I have CrankBros Candy. I've tried many others and though expensive, they have NEVER let me down.
    Just my .02

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: langford's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    684
    I was going to go out and spend the bucks for some Eggbeaters for my first pair of clipless, but I've managed to acquire some Wellgo SPD compatibles and so far am pretty happy with them. I bought 2 used road bikes in the past couple of months, both came with Wellgo SPD compatible pedals. I went out and bought some Shimano mountain biking shoes, and bought cleats for the Wellgos (another $20 or so)!. I've had them for a couple of weeks, they're only a problem when you stop and forget to unclip or get messed up whilst stopped. I haven't fallen off the road bike yet with them, have a coupla times on the mountain bike with unexpected stops on rocks, roots, etc. They unclip easily when it's time to bail.

  15. #15
    U V
    U V is offline

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    88
    [i'm not sure if you can get walking shoes with cleats on] but if you can't get off your bike and injoy the view cumfortly whats the piont in rideing in the country side?

    if you have to, just go for toe clips

  16. #16

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    460
    I've got Shimano 545's and dig them alot. Good size platform for a clipless pedal. I think i paid around $50 from Pricepoint.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    136

    Also condsider shoes

    my first clipless endeavor was on a road bike with <$50 in some richey SPD compatable pedals and cheap Nashbar shoe. This convinced me to do it off-road as well. I shifted the same pedals to my MTB and had a little trouble. So.. I agree with the earlier post, don't scimp on your clipless pedals/ shoes. Your safety is too important. If it turns out you don't like it, which i don't think will happen, you can always unload the equipment on ebay. My recomendation - Time ATAC Aluim with whatever entry level, mountain bike shoe you can get at a good $, I really like my Specialized Comp. For about $100, you should be able to find some ATAC and shoe within about a week. Someone suggested to me to start with only one foot in clipless for the first few rides, I did not do this and had no difficulty getting used to the new setup, but it might work for you.

    The stiffness in the shoe is what you will probably notice more than anything. It makes riding so much more comfortable and the power from your legs is transfered to the pedal more efficiently.

    Look for someone near you who will let you borrow a pair of pedals, and possibly shoes. I have upgraded my pedals, but keep the old ones as a backup. If you need an extra set up cleats, you can probably pick them up at your LBS.

    You will enjoy riding so much more once you make this jump.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    136

    The most important thing to remember

    is that you will only fall with your feet clipped in a very low speeds. I have never, nor do I know anyone, who has ever fallen on their MTB while moving at any speed. Your feet will come out of the pedals if you have any momentum what so ever. I will admit to falling when I first started with clipless, but only strait over sideways. The only thing i really hurt was my pride.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: npstaehling's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    145

    Stick to a name brand

    I know most people have the desire to buy cheap when you are first getting into the sport, but clipless pedals may be one thing to spend a little extra on.

    I started on a set of Onza HO's and they were awful. They released when I didn't want them to and kept me hooked in when I needed out. They were also very difficult to engage when getting started. I tried every adjustment possible and just couldn't make them work. I spent many frustrating hours on the trail and had many rides ruined because of them - not to mention ocassional scrapes and bruises from crashing.

    I then bought a set of shimano LX's (535's?) and had absolutely no trouble right from the start. Just clicked right in and off I went. When I needed to stop my foot came right out. I also stayed clicked in over all of the bumps. I have been riding these pedals for many years. They are no longer black and I have used up about 4 sets of cleats, but they click in just as crisply as when they were new.

    I have since tried several of the cheap Wellgo/Ritchey/Nashbar pedals. Because I have been riding clipless for many years, I have no real difficulty with these pedals. But, they do not engage/disengage as smoothly or reliably as the Shimanos. This may cause some frustration for a beginner first learning to ride clipless. Replacement cleats might alse be a consideration. The Wellgo/Ritchey/Nashbar pedals have used a few different cleats over the years with the various models and it might be difficult to find the correct replacement. Several of the models claim to work with shimano cleats, but on my Ritchey V-2's, my brother's Wellgo's, and my mom's nashbar's I can get in and out with shimano cleats, but that doesn't work very well. (Performance's pedals are probably resold Wellgo's also, but I have never used them and don't know that for sure)

    I have never tried any of the newer pedals like eggbeaters or Atac's, but would guess given the price and reputation that they are a quality pedal that would engage/disengage reliably. I'm also sure you could easily get the correct replacement cleats when they wear out.

  20. #20

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    7
    I have a cheap pair of Nashbar clipless pedals. I think I paid like $25 for them. I like them a lot, but at first they were kinda hard to get the cleat locked into. I think I have the hang of it now.

  21. #21

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    168

    New question here. Shimano PD 515

    So i have gotten my skills to a level wherei feel i am ready for clipless .. What about the Shimano PD 515 .. they are on sale at bieksmart.com .. YOU GUYS LIKE

  22. #22
    bang
    Reputation: Cyco-Dude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,290
    Quote Originally Posted by WeekendShogunWarrior
    So i have gotten my skills to a level wherei feel i am ready for clipless .. What about the Shimano PD 515 .. they are on sale at bieksmart.com .. YOU GUYS LIKE
    if you ride in mud at all, those pedals wouldnt be a good choice. if that were the case id look at the 520's. if you dont ride in the mud and just want some cheap, beginner friendly clipless pedals then the 515's will be fine. the adjustable cleat tension makes clipping out easy, but you'll still fall (just make sure you fall in the grass ) these came stock on my epic BTW.

  23. #23

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    168
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyco-Dude
    if you ride in mud at all, those pedals wouldnt be a good choice. if that were the case id look at the 520's. if you dont ride in the mud and just want some cheap, beginner friendly clipless pedals then the 515's will be fine. the adjustable cleat tension makes clipping out easy, but you'll still fall (just make sure you fall in the grass ) these came stock on my epic BTW.
    I do ride in mud, but its never like a pit or anything .. just little patches .. i do my best to stay of trials after rain .. But if they are not good though i dont want to spend the money i would rather put it into something better. The reason i ask is bikesmart.com has them on sale for 23.99

  24. #24

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    168
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyco-Dude
    id look at the 520's. .
    Just looked into the 20's and they are only 20 bucks more. If they are that much better shuold i just spend the money

  25. #25

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    168
    Quote Originally Posted by WeekendShogunWarrior
    Just looked into the 20's and they are only 20 bucks more. If they are that much better shuold i just spend the money
    THANKS FOR ALL THE HELP GUYS! .. I ENDED UP BUYING THE 520's. This thread was very helpfull. Keep riding

    Cheers
    Sho

  26. #26
    something
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by WeekendShogunWarrior
    THANKS FOR ALL THE HELP GUYS! .. I ENDED UP BUYING THE 520's. This thread was very helpfull. Keep riding

    Cheers
    Sho
    How do you like the 520's? I am considering these as well as the 540's to replace the WTB clipless that came with my bike.
    "POLICE STATION TOILET STOLEN ... Cops have nothing to go on."

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: scottms33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    205

    egg beaters

    what ever you do dont go in to the toe straps, go right to clipless. it doesnt take long to get the hang of it, then after a while you wont want to use anything but..... i use egg beaters on my bike, check out ebay for some used ones or even pick up some new ones for a good deal,

    http://search.ebay.com/egg_Cycling_W...ertyZ1QQsotrZ2


    scott

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    51
    i just got my first mtb and it came with clipless pedels, it doesnt take time to get use to them. i still have to think about it before breaking away but that will all come natural. its not a huge deal and accually really enjoy learning on clipless pedals and will never use anything elnse agian

  29. #29

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    168
    Quote Originally Posted by j-dub
    How do you like the 520's? I am considering these as well as the 540's to replace the WTB clipless that came with my bike.
    They should be arriving today .. i ordered them online .. ill let u know after this weekend. But i am sure that others on this board use them.

Similar Threads

  1. My beginner wife wants to go clipless
    By old_dude in forum Women's Lounge
    Replies: 117
    Last Post: 06-12-2005, 07:08 PM
  2. Upgraded to clipless
    By trevorB in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-20-2004, 07:13 PM
  3. Question about clipless pedals
    By ero2 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-01-2004, 02:01 PM
  4. Why am i struggling with clipless pedals
    By Bird in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 03-27-2004, 06:11 PM
  5. Just bought a 2003 sugar 3+ how much it weigh??
    By roidboy in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 01-17-2004, 02:43 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.