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  1. #1
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    Pop goes the pedal

    Actually it was more of a crack but that's not really the problem.

    The problem is that a third of my pedal broke off while riding on a flat surface. I'm a little puzzled as to why it happened and I was hoping to get some advice on how to avoid such an incident in the future.

    The pedal is a stock Diamondback plastic pedal for my relatively new Response Sport. I've had it for little more than three weeks and have only taken a few rides on urban roads. So I haven't really subjected the bike to formidable terrain yet.

    I'm 208 pounds, so could the splitting be due to my weight?

    The fact that it's a stock plastic pedal on an entry level HT bike?

    Or, is it because when I approach speed bumps, curbs, pot holes and I get off the seat and most of my weight goes to the front portion of the pedals?

    Thanks guys, I appreciate any advice, even the kind that includes vitriolic name calling!

  2. #2
    local trails rider
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    I guess all the things that you mention contributed. In any case, cheap plastic pedals are not very good for anything: they are not particularly strong and they are slippery.

    If you mainly use the bike for riding around town, you could replace those pedals with some metal ones in a similar style.

    If you plan to ride trails or do some "urban assault", some big and nasty flat pedals would make more sense, unless you want to try "clipless" pedals.

    edit:
    getting out of the saddle is a good thing when going over any rough features.

    Going up a curb, your rims will really appreciate it if you lift the front and unweigh the rear to do it. Bunnyhopping it is the next thing but it takes pretty good controll of the bike.
    Last edited by perttime; 03-17-2008 at 05:44 AM.

  3. #3
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    it doesn't cost much to upgrade to a solid metal plaform pedal ...

  4. #4
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    Agreed....

    you're doing everything right, getting up off the seat for speed bumps etc. The two biggest factors are your weight and the pedal. The other factor is doing things the way you should, it is totally correct to get up off the seat for rough sections, especially on a hardtail.

    The solution of course is to upgrade to a metal pedal. Your choice as to type and design. If you're happy with the design of the OEM pedals then look for something similar you'll be able to find some that are nearly identical but of better quality and construction. That's one thing there is no lack of in the cycling world. They make all levels of quality in just about any pedal design you can think of from BMX to Cruiser pedals and everything in between. Just don't cheap out on them. You've just discovered why good pedals are so important, they're one of your three conection points to the bike, and the most important when it comes to moving the bike down the road or trai!

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  5. #5
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    Thanks dudes.

    I was looking at the pedal selection at Joe's Sports and they had two models. The first were plastic pedals from Avner that used rubber on the flat sides of the pedal for comfort. I wasn't exactly thrilled at the prospects of keeping my feet on those consistently.

    The other pedals had the opposite problem however. They were metal Diamondback pedals designed for "Old School BMX" racing.

    I was a little confused by that, as the pedals had sharp metal cylinders protruding from the flat sides. I understand that pedal grip is critical, but it looks like if you miss those pedals you're giving up skin.

    The search continues...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ice Flight
    as the pedals had sharp metal cylinders protruding from the flat sides. I understand that pedal grip is critical, but it looks like if you miss those pedals you're giving up skin.

    The search continues...


    why yes, yes they do help remove skin ... but they do have great grip .. and can hold my 248lbs

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ice Flight
    Thanks dudes.

    I was looking at the pedal selection at Joe's Sports and they had two models. The first were plastic pedals from Avner that used rubber on the flat sides of the pedal for comfort. I wasn't exactly thrilled at the prospects of keeping my feet on those consistently.

    The other pedals had the opposite problem however. They were metal Diamondback pedals designed for "Old School BMX" racing.

    I was a little confused by that, as the pedals had sharp metal cylinders protruding from the flat sides. I understand that pedal grip is critical, but it looks like if you miss those pedals you're giving up skin.

    The search continues...
    I believe that is why they wear shin guards (sorry I couldn't help it). What are the price differences between a good metal platform and an entry level clipless? I will be upgrading at the end of the summer or sooner me thinks.
    Last edited by Jackrabbit49er; 03-17-2008 at 12:16 PM.
    The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.

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  8. #8
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    good metal ones are around 30 to 50 ... entry level clipless are in the 50 range i beleive plus the cost of the shoes .. so figure 90 to 120 to start off

  9. #9
    local trails rider
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    I think clipless will cost more after you count in the cycling specific shoes that you will need.

    Clipless pedals like Shimano 520, or Time Alium or ATAC do not cost a fortune but you need a pair of shoes that fit.

    Here's a couple of pretty decent flat pedals:
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/168...-V8-Pedals.htm
    http://www.bikeparts.com/search_resu...p?ID=BPC120645

  10. #10
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    Send me your address and I'll send you my pedals off of my DB Response Sport. I put Mallets on mine. E-mail is VTSteele@yahoo.com
    Quote Originally Posted by Ice Flight
    Thanks dudes.

    I was looking at the pedal selection at Joe's Sports and they had two models. The first were plastic pedals from Avner that used rubber on the flat sides of the pedal for comfort. I wasn't exactly thrilled at the prospects of keeping my feet on those consistently.

    The other pedals had the opposite problem however. They were metal Diamondback pedals designed for "Old School BMX" racing.

    I was a little confused by that, as the pedals had sharp metal cylinders protruding from the flat sides. I understand that pedal grip is critical, but it looks like if you miss those pedals you're giving up skin.

    The search continues...

  11. #11
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    I'm 285 without gear, and can say that I can't use plastic pedals. I haven't broken any before, but I can't remember using them since the 1990's.

    I havent had any problems with platform pedals, or any pedal for that matter that cost $20.00 or more a pair. i know thats kind of a vague way to compare a pedals quality. I have had cheaper pedals get loose at the bearing cones after hammering away on them.

    Any good platform (non plastic) pedal should stand up to your weight even if you are doing 4 foot drops. Just get some crank bros 50/50's or something comparable.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  12. #12
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    I had craptastic plastic pedals on my Iron Horse I bought from Dicks, never used them as I picked up a pair of Diamond Back pedals from Dicks at the same time. $20 and a year of abuse, still goin strong. You could spend more for something with sealed bearings or replaceable pins if you feel the need, I didn't.

  13. #13
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    Something like this would work for you
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...13+Pedals.aspx
    Yeah, they will knick your shins if you slip off them, but they grip alot better, so that doesnt happen often if you have good shoes. Alternatively, switch to clipless and something like a Shimano M520 pedal and some SPD shoes for about $120.

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