New rear cassette- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New rear cassette

    So this is what happened to my cassette on my bike. I don't think I am going to waste my time and have a new one warrentied. I am looking for an upgrade. This is the current component-SRAM PG 830 11x32, 8-Speed. Any recommendations on an upgrade? I am not going to spend like $100, but closer to the $50 range. I will install myself.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails New rear cassette-img_20111030_140448.jpg  

    Last edited by ej63090; 10-30-2011 at 06:20 PM.

  2. #2
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    What happened?

    A PG 850 is a little lighter, what type of upgrade are you looking for?

  3. #3
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    Stronger-Better performance. I am a bigger rider @ 240ish so weight is not a focus.

  4. #4
    Just Ride
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    dirty drive train a contributing factor perhaps?
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Am I looking at a ripped off tooth on the small cog?

    How'd you break it?

    I'd probably just keep getting PG-830s. Different grades and treatments of steel can have different fracture strengths. But I have no idea what kinds of steel, and what treatments, the different cassettes use. I'd be disinclined to spend more on the off chance that I was getting into something better, because I think it's more the precision of the machining, the finish, and presence of a spider that makes a more expensive cassette more expensive. None of those would effect your ability to rip a tooth off.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
    Former Bike Wrench
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    I've had a little better luck with Shimano cassettes over the years. Might try a HG41

    Shimano HG41 8 speed 11-32t Cassette - AEBike.com

  7. #7
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    Unless something hit it that I didn't know about, it must have been just too much me. When I first started riding I was in the 1x8 gear a lot. And did a lot of climbs in the 8 gear. I didn't notice it until it started skipping teeth. Really weird. I'm not sure whether to switch to the shimano or the 850 or stay with the 830 because they are all relatively cheap, and IMO for the $20 for a new cassette driving to the bike shop and leaving the bike and whatnot is not worth the money.

  8. #8
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    Assuming that you have a 3x8 drivetrain, 1x8 is a combination you want to avoid as it puts too much sideways force on the chain and apparently the gear teeth as well.

  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Personally, I prefer Shimano cassettes. I don't have any solid reasons to back it up, which is why I didn't suggest switching earlier. They just seem a little better in some way I can't put my finger on.

    Another not very solid reason - historically, Shimano has cold-forged their components. This is a better process for just about any metal. I don't know if that's true now, or ever, of the cassettes, though.

    A lot of current parts for bicycles are made by CNC machining. While the plate or billet that the part is cut out of may be manufactured in a way that makes it pretty strong, the strength of the material is not constant throughout the piece - the microstructure actually aligns to the surface of the piece, and varies deeper in the piece. So when a billet is machined, all that lovely hardening is cut away and recycled, leaving something that's not as hard or as strong. It's great as a last step, to dress up the edges and points on a piece that's forged, which is usually not a super-precise process. But it's pretty crappy as the only step.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
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    I'll probably just go with the shimano. The SRAM gets poor reviews. But I guess who reviews a cassette unless their upset or have a XTR.

  11. #11
    Former Bike Wrench
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr View Post
    Assuming that you have a 3x8 drivetrain, 1x8 is a combination you want to avoid as it puts too much sideways force on the chain and apparently the gear teeth as well.
    2nd that, this is cross chaining and will increase wear and the chance of failure of the cassette and chain.

  12. #12
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    Learned that the hard way.

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