new to mtb need help selecting a fuji- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    new to mtb need help selecting a fuji

    This is a fuji navada 3.0 2011 at my lbs for $499 is it a good deal
    ill be fitness riding and paved trails
    Thanks for your help

    COLOR(S) Black, Blue
    STEP-THROUGH COLOR(S) Matte White
    MAIN FRAME Fuji A1-SL Aluminum with PowerCurve down tube, Tri shaped top tube, Oversized seat tube and integrated head tube, double water bottle mounts
    REAR TRIANGLE Fuji A1-SL aluminum with S-bend stay, Cold forged dropout and disc mount w/replaceable hanger
    FORK SR Suntour XCT, 80mm Travel w/Mechanical LO
    REAR SHOCK Nil
    CRANKSET Shimano M131 24/34/42T w/Chainguard
    BOTTOM BRACKET Sealed Cartridge Bearing ST
    PEDALS Wellgo ATB
    FRONT DERAILLEUR Shimano TX-50, 34.9mm
    REAR DERAILLEUR Shimano Altus 8sp
    SHIFTERS Shimano EF-51 EZ Fire shifter/brake, 24-speed
    CASSETTE Shimano Cassette, 11-34T 8sp
    CHAIN KMC Z-72, 8-speed
    WHEELSET Fuji Custom Al, 32H, QR hubs, Double Wall Al rims
    TIRES Kenda K-837F/K-848R ATB, 26 x 2.1" Wire Bead
    BRAKE SET Tektro V-Brake
    BRAKE LEVERS Shimano ST-EF51 Forged Alloy
    HEADSET Fuji Custom 1 1/8" Press Fit Integrated, 30mm spacers
    HANDLEBAR Fuji Riser 20 Alloy Riser Bar
    STEM Fuji Forged Alloy w/removable faceplate
    TAPE/GRIP Fuji Dual Density Kraton rubber
    SADDLE Fuji Sport MTB w/ steel rail
    SEAT POST Fuji Alloy micro adjust 350x31.6mm
    WEIGHT- LBS/KG S.O. - 30.7 lbs / 13.9 kg , S.T. - 30.6 lbs / 13.9 kg



    navada 3.0 2010 $390 shiped online

    MAIN FRAME NEW Fuji Altair 1 aluminum with PowerCurve down tube, Tri shaped top tube, Oversized seat tube and integrated head tube, double water bottle mounts
    REAR TRIANGLE Fuji Altair 1 aluminum with S-bend stay, Cold forged dropout and disc mount w/replaceable hanger
    FORK SR Suntour XCT-MLO w/Mechanical LO & 80mm Travel
    CRANKSET NEW SR Suntour XTC Forged Alloy, 24/34/42T w/Chainguard
    BOTTOM BRACKET Sealed Cartridge Bearing ST
    PEDALS FPD ATB
    FRONT DERAILLEUR Shimano FD-C050, 34.9mm
    REAR DERAILLEUR SRAM X.4
    SHIFTERS SRAM x.4 Trigger, 24-speed
    CASSETTE SRAM PG-820, 11-32T 8-speed
    CHAIN KMC Z-72, 8sp
    FRONT HUB Fuji oversized Disc Al, 32H, QR
    REAR HUB Fuji oversized Disc Al cassette, 32H, QR
    SPOKES 14G Stainless Steel
    RIMS Stars Circle J-19SD Double Wall Al
    TIRES Kenda K-837F/K-848R ATB, 26 x 2.1"
    TUBES Kenda A/V ATB
    BRAKE SET NEW Tektro Novela mechanical disc w/160mm rotor
    BRAKE LEVERS Tektro RS-360 Forged Alloy
    HEADSET V.P. 1 1/8" Press Fit Integrated, 30mm spacers
    HANDLEBAR Fuji Riser 20 aluminum
    STEM Fuji Forged Aluminum w/removable faceplate
    TAPE/GRIP Fuji Kraton rubber
    SADDLE Fuji Race MTB
    SEAT POST Fuji Aluminum micro adjust 350 mm
    SEAT CLAMP Fuji Alloy, 34.9mm Laser Etched QR
    WEIGHT, LB./KG. 14.88kg / 32.81lbs - M 14.83kg / 32.70lbs - L
    Last edited by nuxbag; 10-20-2011 at 01:55 PM.

  2. #2
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    I'd go with the 2010 3.0 navada. Its about $100 cheaper and it has disk brakes vs the v brakes on the 2011. Be aware that you'll probably have to adjust the derailures. Cheapest way is to find someone who knows how to do it and buy them a six pack or dinner. You can learn how to do it too from you tube.
    When the **** did we get ice cream?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by crclawn View Post
    I'd go with the 2010 3.0 navada. Its about $100 cheaper and it has disk brakes vs the v brakes on the 2011. Be aware that you'll probably have to adjust the derailures. Cheapest way is to find someone who knows how to do it and buy them a six pack or dinner. You can learn how to do it too from you tube.
    thats what i was thinking im going to get on the one at the bike shop first to check out the clearance of the online one all they have is a 19" and i know i can clear 17or18 what do you think of the sram components and the suntuor cranks

  4. #4
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    It is a low end bike so the components are nothing special. They will work for what you plan on using the bike for. I agree with crclawn, go with the the 2010, it is better to have the disk brakes. Just wondering, what made you decide to get a mountain bike if you are not riding on dirt? Do you plan to get into non paved trails?

  5. #5
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    I have last year's Fuji Nevada 2.0 and have been really enjoying it for the 6 months Ive had it. Im definitely in the market for a FS now, but Im sure the nevada will sure you well.

  6. #6
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    The Sram 4 will get the job done. If all your going to do is ride like you described, the fork should be fine. I would def upgrade the calipers on the brakes to BB7. If you keep the stock calipers on, you're going to be dealing with alot of bent rotors and brake rub. This is due to the fact that Tektro Novel is only adjustable from one side vs the BB7 you can adjust both pads and actually center the brake around the pad. I would def think about re-greasing the hubs and pull the crank (even eariler and put some grease on the treads that the bottom bracket screws into, so it doesn't get siezed up) at about the six month mark. I have a Fuji and it came with some cheap grease. Not a big deal, you should re-grease your hubs at intervals anyways. Use a quality grease like Park.
    When the **** did we get ice cream?

  7. #7
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    Here's my Fuji Tahoe Comp 29er. The frames on the Fuji are rock solid. Very sturdy and huge downtube. The paint was pretty good too. I've put about 1200 miles on this bike. I change out the Dart 3 fork to a Voodoo Zombie rigid fork and upgraded the BB5 brakes with some Tektro Augira Comp hydraulic brakes. I got an extra wheelset and installed street tires (700x35) when I use if for commuting.

    Full rigid for mt bike



    Street tires 35x700 for commuting:
    When the **** did we get ice cream?

  8. #8
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    You're going to have to spend about 50$ (more or less) at a bike shop to get the bike built up anyways, so you might as well buy at the LBS, in my opinion! Then you get the added benefit of a shop you can go to with your problems, instead of an online retailer.

  9. #9
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    You're going to have to spend about 50$ (more or less) at a bike shop to get the bike built up anyways, so you might as well buy at the LBS, in my opinion! Then you get the added benefit of a shop you can go to with your problems, instead of an online retailer.
    $105 more for something with v-brakes from a bike shop. (Plus the extra $50 in taxes). Then spend another $200 converting the v brakes to disk when he can get it shipped for under $400. No way. Learn to wrench yourself and you'll cut down on your LBS visits by 95%. When you rely on LBS, your subject to thier hours, their "were super busy right now, we'll get to your bike after Tuesday". "Hi, LBS, I dropped of my bike for a derailuere adjustment and the thing is still rubbing, so i guess I'll have to lug it back, spend an hour out of my day and more gas money to drop the thing back off!!!". Or I can just throw it on the bike stand and adjust it in five minutes and be riding. Is learning frustrating at first, Yes, but once you learn its very rewarding to "do it yourself". If your budget is around $400-$500 Learn to wrench!!!!!! If money grows on trees and you have a $10000 S-works or you just cant stand wrenching, then by all means, use the LBS. IMHO.
    When the **** did we get ice cream?

  10. #10
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    nice what kind of stand is that.




    Quote Originally Posted by crclawn View Post
    Here's my Fuji Tahoe Comp 29er. The frames on the Fuji are rock solid. Very sturdy and huge downtube. The paint was pretty good too. I've put about 1200 miles on this bike. I change out the Dart 3 fork to a Voodoo Zombie rigid fork and upgraded the BB5 brakes with some Tektro Augira Comp hydraulic brakes. I got an extra wheelset and installed street tires (700x35) when I use if for commuting.

    Full rigid for mt bike



    Street tires 35x700 for commuting:

  11. #11
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    agreed I took all of that in to consideration I like doing things my self I've been on YouTube as well as my son's bike to work on I'm very handy.



    Quote Originally Posted by crclawn View Post
    $105 more for something with v-brakes from a bike shop. (Plus the extra $50 in taxes). Then spend another $200 converting the v brakes to disk when he can get it shipped for under $400. No way. Learn to wrench yourself and you'll cut down on your LBS visits by 95%. When you rely on LBS, your subject to thier hours, their "were super busy right now, we'll get to your bike after Tuesday". "Hi, LBS, I dropped of my bike for a derailuere adjustment and the thing is still rubbing, so i guess I'll have to lug it back, spend an hour out of my day and more gas money to drop the thing back off!!!". Or I can just throw it on the bike stand and adjust it in five minutes and be riding. Is learning frustrating at first, Yes, but once you learn its very rewarding to "do it yourself". If your budget is around $400-$500 Learn to wrench!!!!!! If money grows on trees and you have a $10000 S-works or you just cant stand wrenching, then by all means, use the LBS. IMHO.

  12. #12
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    I want the option to go on a dirt trail if I want to.


    Quote Originally Posted by lovetranquillity View Post
    It is a low end bike so the components are nothing special. They will work for what you plan on using the bike for. I agree with crclawn, go with the the 2010, it is better to have the disk brakes. Just wondering, what made you decide to get a mountain bike if you are not riding on dirt? Do you plan to get into non paved trails?

  13. #13
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    nice what kind of stand is that.
    The repair stand is Spin Doctor Pro stand. The bike rack stand is a Super Rack. Keep an eye out at Performance. They had this repair stand on sale for $159 plus 10% off so I got it out the door for $159. Its pretty nice, I couldn't pass up the price, but if I had to do it over I would have payed a little more for Feedback sports pro elite:

    Feedback Sports Pro-Elite Bicycle Repair Stand from ModernBike.com
    When the **** did we get ice cream?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by crclawn View Post
    $105 more for something with v-brakes from a bike shop. (Plus the extra $50 in taxes). Then spend another $200 converting the v brakes to disk when he can get it shipped for under $400. No way. Learn to wrench yourself and you'll cut down on your LBS visits by 95%. When you rely on LBS, your subject to thier hours, their "were super busy right now, we'll get to your bike after Tuesday". "Hi, LBS, I dropped of my bike for a derailuere adjustment and the thing is still rubbing, so i guess I'll have to lug it back, spend an hour out of my day and more gas money to drop the thing back off!!!". Or I can just throw it on the bike stand and adjust it in five minutes and be riding. Is learning frustrating at first, Yes, but once you learn its very rewarding to "do it yourself". If your budget is around $400-$500 Learn to wrench!!!!!! If money grows on trees and you have a $10000 S-works or you just cant stand wrenching, then by all means, use the LBS. IMHO.
    Those Tektro Novelas really aren't all that much better than V-brakes, in my opinion. I wouldn't even bother converting the bike to disc even if I could do it for free.

    It is very rewarding to learn to wrench, you're absolutely right! But it does take a lot of time to understand exactly what needs adjustment/maintenance on a bike, how it needs adjustment/maintenance, and when. At-home mechanics starting out are not aware of these things at first, and "learning to wrench" isn't like learning to clean a toilet, it's more like learning a language. You've never "learned how to wrench." You're always learning.

    And I'm sorry that you've had bad experiences with local bike shops and think they're only for rich people. Good bike shops will stand behind their product, which makes it totally worth it if a warantee replacement of a component or frame is necessary.

    Do whatever you feel comfortable with!

  15. #15
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    it depends on the kind of person you are, I'm very mechanistically inclined I work on my own car its basically the same unscrew it, grease it, replace it, put it back together and if if I need something that requires special knowledge and or tool that's when I take it to the shop where I would most likely watch and learn for the next time the bike still has a warranty. and as far as the disc brakes go I'm 290 pounds and they stop me just fine and when I want to upgrade the hubs and brackets are there already.




    Quote Originally Posted by shamethellama View Post
    Those Tektro Novelas really aren't all that much better than V-brakes, in my opinion. I wouldn't even bother converting the bike to disc even if I could do it for free.

    It is very rewarding to learn to wrench, you're absolutely right! But it does take a lot of time to understand exactly what needs adjustment/maintenance on a bike, how it needs adjustment/maintenance, and when. At-home mechanics starting out are not aware of these things at first, and "learning to wrench" isn't like learning to clean a toilet, it's more like learning a language. You've never "learned how to wrench." You're always learning.

    And I'm sorry that you've had bad experiences with local bike shops and think they're only for rich people. Good bike shops will stand behind their product, which makes it totally worth it if a warantee replacement of a component or frame is necessary.

    Do whatever you feel comfortable with!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuxbag View Post
    it depends on the kind of person you are, I'm very mechanistically inclined I work on my own car its basically the same unscrew it, grease it, replace it, put it back together and if if I need something that requires special knowledge and or tool that's when I take it to the shop where I would most likely watch and learn for the next time the bike still has a warranty. and as far as the disc brakes go I'm 290 pounds and they stop me just fine and when I want to upgrade the hubs and brackets are there already.
    It's definitely not as simple as "unscrew it, grease it, and replace it." And I'd like to know what kind of car you're working on, because my Outback, while not a difficult car to work on, is not that simple either. Then again, maybe you're just much more mechanically inclined than I. May I suggest the Park Tool Blue Book of Bicycle Repair. Great tool for the starting mechanic. On par with Haynes manuals from the car world. When I'm learning something new, I typically need manuals or someone teaching me to do things, as I'm not really a quick or intuitive learner.

    You're spot on about the disc brakes though! I didn't think about upgradeability.

    Good luck!

  17. #17
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    If he gets the v brakes and then wants to switch to disk, he'll have to buy a wheelset with hubs that can accept disk brakes or swap out the hubs. Then if his fork does not have a disk mount, he'll have to swap out fork. Then he'll have to buy rotors. (thats going to cost a boat load of money). If he gets the bike that is already set up for disk brakes all he has to do is upgrade the calipers. BB7 on ebay for $69 bucks with adapters. Now, he has a pretty decent set up and not crappy v brakes. Get the frekin bike thats already set up for disk brakes.

    AVID BB7 DISC BRAKE FRONT AND REAR NEW | eBay
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by crclawn View Post
    If he gets the v brakes and then wants to switch to disk, he'll have to buy a wheelset with hubs that can accept disk brakes or swap out the hubs. Then if his fork does not have a disk mount, he'll have to swap out fork. Then he'll have to buy rotors. (thats going to cost a boat load of money). If he gets the bike that is already set up for disk brakes all he has to do is upgrade the calipers. BB7 on ebay for $69 bucks with adapters. Now, he has a pretty decent set up and not crappy v brakes. Get the frekin bike thats already set up for disk brakes.

    AVID BB7 DISC BRAKE FRONT AND REAR NEW | eBay
    Not sure who you're trying to convince, we've all agreed on this already!

  19. #19
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    correct


    Quote Originally Posted by shamethellama View Post
    Not sure who you're trying to convince, we've all agreed on this already!

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