New to MTB..Craigslist find. Yay or Nay?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New to MTB..Craigslist find. Yay or Nay?

    Hello! A beginner here with a craigslist find that I need guidance on. Looking for a bike to mainly ride with the kids and occasionally take to a trail. Found this on Craigslist but the price and steep rear fork worry me. Since I want to keep the cost down, I figured an old quality bike would be my best bet.

    Opinions from the pros? As of now, I set up a meeting in a few hours!

    Thanks!!!

    https://stlouis.craigslist.org/bik/d...970832199.html

  2. #2
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    Around here, that would be overpriced, you'd maybe get $200 for it if it's in good condition, you're looking at a 25 year old aluminum bike. Not sure what you mean by "steep rear fork". And it doesn't have v-brakes, it has cantilevers.

    As always, be sure the size is correct for you.
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    That does not look like a medium.

    And it's not even close to worth $275, maybe $150.
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  4. #4
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    That's a nay at that price. Sad thing is it doesn't look like there's much on craigslist or offer up. You're better off waiting for a good deal & posting what you find here. I'm sure you'll find something eventually. Might want to check your local pawn shops in the hope they have something better than whats out there now.
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    Nay, like he said in the ad it would be fine for the Katy Trail. If you want to ride any of the local single track that bike isn't going to do you an favors.

  6. #6
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    Pass. Keep looking or spend a little more for an entry-level mtb from one of the better known brands.

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    I think the op means the steep angle on the seat stays and short chain stays when they say "short back fork".
    If you do end up checking out the bike, pay careful attention to the welds where the two tubes meet the steerer tube, around the bottom bracket, at the place where there the dropouts (the part the rear wheel attaches) are welded to the stays, etc. Aluminum is stiff, and the welds are under a great deal of strain. Also keep in mind that Cannondale earned themselves a bit of a nickname back in the day: Crack-n-Fail.
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  8. #8
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    For slightly more money you can buy a BRAND NEW entry level bike. It'll be new, warranty, at least slightly modern components, no question marks...

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    58 cm top tube is for someone around 5'10" to 6' tall.

    What is your budget? There are bikes out there. Do you want a gravel bike? Or a mountain bike?
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    Thanks for the replies! I originally started looking for new entry level bikes in the $500-600 range, but then came across a bunch of threads of people saying the components you get are so bad it's really a waste of money (REI had a Trail 7, I think, that I recall people discouraging other people from). Then I decided to look older bikes w better components (albeit no suspension etc) in the $200 price range. Sort of lost to be honest, as I'm unfamiliar to this "world" and the terminology, like all other niches, is confusing.

    I'm more then open to suggestions so fire away! It will be used mostly on roads and trails (dirt and gravel I suppose).

    Here's one more I found on Craigslist, and again, thanks for all the help!

    https://stlouis.craigslist.org/bik/d...978551109.html

  11. #11
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    Keep on looking, you can just about buy a new quality bike for that price.

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    How about a list of some that are above budget, but well-priced and a decent starting point to look? All good quality. And if you find one used, even better (check pink bike) (List in progress).

    Look through and pay attention to the different wheel sizes, intended use, and frame materials. Those are a good place to start with learning different bike types while managing not to get overwhelmed with TMI. The only one I listed with suspension is the Salsa Timberjack. Good suspension is expensive; the Karate Monkey is available with or without suspension. Much more $& with, obviously.

    Also, most bike shops have lawaway. If you ask.

    On-off road. Surly Bridge Club. Touring/gravel bike. https://surlybikes.com/bikes/bridge_club
    Not a true mountain bike. But an excellent all-road bike:

    Touring/gravel. Surly Ogre. Like above, but with better technology. https://surlybikes.com/bikes/ogre

    Full trail bike. Surly Karate Monkey. Old school rigid with new technology. https://surlybikes.com/bikes/karate_monkey

    Salsa Timberjack. Again, a full trail bike. Hard tail with suspension fork. https://salsacycles.com/bikes/timber...ack_deore_27.5

    I really should point out that the Timberjack is also available in 29' diameter wheels. The difference will be more narrow tires than the 27.5 version, as those are actually 27.5+. https://salsacycles.com/bikes/timber...rjack_deore_29

    Salsa journeyman flatbar. Gravel/all road. Lowest price Iíve listed for new bikes.
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    Last edited by Muirenn; 2 Weeks Ago at 01:02 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmonolo View Post
    Thanks for the replies! I originally started looking for new entry level bikes in the $500-600 range, but then came across a bunch of threads of people saying the components you get are so bad it's really a waste of money (REI had a Trail 7, I think, that I recall people discouraging other people from). Then I decided to look older bikes w better components (albeit no suspension etc) in the $200 price range. Sort of lost to be honest, as I'm unfamiliar to this "world" and the terminology, like all other niches, is confusing.

    I'm more then open to suggestions so fire away! It will be used mostly on roads and trails (dirt and gravel I suppose).

    Here's one more I found on Craigslist, and again, thanks for all the help!

    https://stlouis.craigslist.org/bik/d...978551109.html
    Despite what the ad says, looks like it is a 1998. 7-speed, $650 msrp. Don't get hung up thinking Cannondale is super quality making these worth what they are asking for a 20+ year old bike.

    https://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/...%20&model=F400

    Granted, these types of pricing tend to be low, but the "trade-in value" might be pretty close to what you would get. Maybe worth around $100 off of CL if the fork still kind of works.

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  14. #14
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    Good point. Here is a link to Bicycle Bluebook with the same bike. The range there is $73 to $119. Which honestly seems too high to me.

    https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/valu...product/80162/
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    Bikes that old are meant for people that either have nostalgia and are willing/capable to do a total rebuild or to merely be decorations at a LBS or garage or shop.

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    OP, how tall are you so that people can keep an eye out for a deal?

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    It reminds me of my first mountain bike - a 1997 Gary Fisher Marlin. I loved that bike and rode the hell out of it but would not pay $250 for one. If you are willing to spend a little bit more, you could probably find a nice, contemporary hardtail for $350ish.

    Here is what I see locally. Asking $450 but probably could be gotten for $400 or a bit less.

    https://philadelphia.craigslist.org/...960271716.html

    https://philadelphia.craigslist.org/...990737918.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    OP, how tall are you so that people can keep an eye out for a deal?
    A shade under 6'0". It seems most manufacturers recommend a Large framed bike but I'm looking at both Med and Large.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dung Hopper View Post
    It reminds me of my first mountain bike - a 1997 Gary Fisher Marlin. I loved that bike and rode the hell out of it but would not pay $250 for one. If you are willing to spend a little bit more, you could probably find a nice, contemporary hardtail for $350ish.

    Here is what I see locally. Asking $450 but probably could be gotten for $400 or a bit less.

    https://philadelphia.craigslist.org/...960271716.html

    https://philadelphia.craigslist.org/...990737918.html
    Thanks for the input. I'd be all over those if they were available locally!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmonolo View Post
    A shade under 6'0". It seems most manufacturers recommend a Large framed bike but I'm looking at both Med and Large.
    I think large. I'm 5'6.75 and use a medium, though I am a little different to fit with longer than average inseam and arm length.
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    How about a fully rigid Marin Pine Mountain with 27.5+ wheels and hydraulic brakes? On sale brand new at Jenson Cycles for $630.00. The Marin Pine Mountain runs just a little smaller than the equivalent Surly Karate Monkey, and I agree wit their size chart that at 6 feet, you would be between a large and an Xlarge. I'd say XL if you have a very long wingspan.

    https://www.jensonusa.com/Marin-Pine-Mountain-Bike-2019

    I honestly consider the Pine Mountain a value priced Karate Monkey. It's a nifty bike. Nice steel frameset, too. So smooth compared to aluminum. And Deore components are really the base level I'd consider for my own bikes (I don't buy cheap stuff, but I will buy good value).
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmonolo View Post
    A shade under 6'0". It seems most manufacturers recommend a Large framed bike but I'm looking at both Med and Large.
    Large all day, I'm also a shade under 6' myself. That Marin is a great bike. I wouldn't go XL or M.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    How about a fully rigid Marin Pine Mountain with 27.5+ wheels and hydraulic brakes? On sale brand new at Jenson Cycles for $630.00. The Marin Pine Mountain runs just a little smaller than the equivalent Surly Karate Monkey, and I agree wit their size chart that at 6 feet, you would be between a large and an Xlarge. I'd say XL if you have a very long wingspan.

    https://www.jensonusa.com/Marin-Pine-Mountain-Bike-2019

    I honestly consider the Pine Mountain a value priced Karate Monkey. It's a nifty bike. Nice steel frameset, too. So smooth compared to aluminum. And Deore components are really the base level I'd consider for my own bikes (I don't buy cheap stuff, but I will buy good value).
    Wow I really like that bike! And I really appreciate the effort in trying to find something to meet my needs. That might be the one!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmonolo View Post
    Wow I really like that bike! And I really appreciate the effort in trying to find something to meet my needs. That might be the one!
    That Marin is the perfect bike for the type of riding you describe. No suspension means less maintenance. Steel frame and 27.5+ means smooth ride even on gravel and dirt paths. Good luck with your purchase!

  25. #25
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    It does seem like a great deal.
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    Well. I added the bike to the cart and proceeded w the checkout. By the time I went to process the order it said my cart was empty. Went to go add it again and they only had the small frame available! Unreal...just my luck!

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    Ouch. That bike is still out there, and often on sale. Just keep an eye out.
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    Don't know if the size large works for you, but this bike shop has a returned Pine Mountain for sale. I would try to get the price down a bit.

    https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2608798/
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    So I called to confirm they sold the large frame, and they did. But the gentleman on the phone offered me this bike, and I went with it. He knocked the price down to match the Marin which I thought was a good deal. Thoughts?

    https://www.jensonusa.com/Jamis-Drag...t-26-Bike-2018

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmonolo View Post
    So I called to confirm they sold the large frame, and they did. But the gentleman on the phone offered me this bike, and I went with it. He knocked the price down to match the Marin which I thought was a good deal. Thoughts?

    https://www.jensonusa.com/Jamis-Drag...t-26-Bike-2018
    Awesome! You're going to love it.

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    I think you just robbed the bank.

    Congrats! Several steps above a starter bike at a great price. And 26+ is an unusual size, but will handle very well (and be nimble).


    Very nice rims and suspension fork. Did you get a chance to discuss sizing? 6 feet is usually a benchmark size large, which makes you fairly straightforward to fit.
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    We did. He suggested a Large as well. Iím sure glad a didnít drop that $200 on a 20 year old bike now! Really excited to get it...donít love the color but itís just a color. Canít wait.

    Thanks again for all the help, I really appreciate it.

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    I like this thread. You already have an excellent bike on the way, and we didn't spend weeks going back and forth with analysis paralysis. Good job!
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    I know you said you don't have any major ambition to ride trails, but that Jamis is certainly not going to hold you back. Start exploring trails as you become comfortable on that bike and you'll soon find it impossible to resist. If you're near St. Louis, I assume you see a snowy winter (it's over 100 degrees here in Texas still, so I have no experience with that.) Those big ol fat tires could be a ton of fun in the snow.

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    It's tough for me to say, but the new bike is waaaay better than the old one! Retro-grouch approved!

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  36. #36
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    That is a very interesting bike. Anyone else notice the sliding dropouts?

    Here's an uber-brief review. (MSRP was originally $2500?)
    https://www.bikemag.com/gear/mountai...slayer-26-pro/

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    That is a very interesting bike. Anyone else notice the sliding dropouts?

    Here's an uber-brief review. (MSRP was originally $2500?)
    https://www.bikemag.com/gear/mountai...slayer-26-pro/
    The 'pro' version has an MSRP of $2500.00. Sport version is just under $1400.00. Still a great deal and bike. I think the plus tires will work on snow-plowed roads and slush. Deeper snow need actual fat tires. But that bike will be rideable year-round in St Louis.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I know you said you don't have any major ambition to ride trails, but that Jamis is certainly not going to hold you back. Start exploring trails as you become comfortable on that bike and you'll soon find it impossible to resist. If you're near St. Louis, I assume you see a snowy winter (it's over 100 degrees here in Texas still, so I have no experience with that.) Those big ol fat tires could be a ton of fun in the snow.
    Yeah to be honest, a lot of my apprehension as to trails came from the, what I perceived, crazy prices that mtbís garnered. I really didnít think I could get into a quality mtb under $1k. Iím young, active, and curious so I can definitely see myself exploring some trails very soon.

  39. #39
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    Sweet! Jensons comes through again, good choice to call them.

    Keep us posted, and enjoy!
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    The 'pro' version has an MSRP of $2500.00. Sport version is just under $1400.00. Still a great deal and bike. I think the plus tires will work on snow-plowed roads and slush. Deeper snow need actual fat tires. But that bike will be rideable year-round in St Louis.
    Good catch Muirenn, but what is the deal with the sliding dropout? Is this a 26" steel singlespeed candidate?

  41. #41
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    https://bikepacking.com/bikes/jamis-...slayer-review/

    Here is a nice review of the Dragonslayer.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmonolo View Post
    We did. He suggested a Large as well. Iím sure glad a didnít drop that $200 on a 20 year old bike now! Really excited to get it...donít love the color but itís just a color. Canít wait.

    Thanks again for all the help, I really appreciate it.
    That's a great bike. I looked everywhere to find one in a store when I got my Karate Monkey, and I couldn't find one. To get it for $6xx is a steal.

    Also, if you hate the color, just strip the frame and take it to a powdercoater. It costs $100ish and it can be any color you want.

  43. #43
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    Sliding dropouts are always a nice feature:
    *Adjust chainstay length to change the handling. Long=more stable, short=more flickable.
    *Accommodate bigger wheels and tires, if you want to experiment with different wheel sizes.
    *Convert completely to singlespeed. Single-speeding is a niche within the mtb world. Many people buy a SS bike just to have something simple and more challenging, while others ride SS only like it's a cult.
    *If you mangle your rear derailer during a ride and need to just get out, you can wrap your chain around one rear cog, shorten the chain with a chain tool, then move the dropouts to hold the chai in place. Essentially an emergency singlespeed option. I had to help a fellow rider do this just last night.

    Regarding the cost of bikes, yeah, it's expensive. So is golf, jet skis, snowboarding, photography, and any other hobby. That's a fact of modern living. Sitting around on your ass all the time is even more expensive when you consider what heart surgery costs! Accept that it's going to cost you to buy gear and set a budget. Buy used gear, look for sales, learn how to work on your own bike, and just exercise restraint when you don't really "need" to buy anything.

    If you've not already considered this, you need some $$ for the bare essentials:
    Bicycle pump
    Helmet- duh
    Eyewear (any glasses will do to keep dust, bugs, tree branches, etc out of your eyeballs)
    Water carrying- either a bottle and cage on your bike or a pack of some sort
    Gloves are a good idea. Hardwear store gloves work fine
    Lights- little blinky LED lights, white front and red rear, to make you more visible for drivers
    Basic tools- metric allens, screwdriver, chain lube, spare tube, etc.

    All of this stuff can be acquired cheap and you won't need to replace any of them soon.

  44. #44
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    If you want to try out Singletrack take it to Bootleggers in Creve Coeur park. Simple, fun trail. If you like that get on GORCs website to find the rest of the trails in the area. Lot of good miles around St Louis. For what its worth, I ride a Krampus year round here on all the local gravel and Singletrack. That Jamis will be just fine for what you want to do.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Sliding dropouts are always a nice feature:
    *Adjust chainstay length to change the handling. Long=more stable, short=more flickable.
    *Accommodate bigger wheels and tires, if you want to experiment with different wheel sizes.
    *Convert completely to singlespeed. Single-speeding is a niche within the mtb world. Many people buy a SS bike just to have something simple and more challenging, while others ride SS only like it's a cult.
    *If you mangle your rear derailer during a ride and need to just get out, you can wrap your chain around one rear cog, shorten the chain with a chain tool, then move the dropouts to hold the chai in place. Essentially an emergency singlespeed option. I had to help a fellow rider do this just last night.

    Regarding the cost of bikes, yeah, it's expensive. So is golf, jet skis, snowboarding, photography, and any other hobby. That's a fact of modern living. Sitting around on your ass all the time is even more expensive when you consider what heart surgery costs! Accept that it's going to cost you to buy gear and set a budget. Buy used gear, look for sales, learn how to work on your own bike, and just exercise restraint when you don't really "need" to buy anything.

    If you've not already considered this, you need some $$ for the bare essentials:
    Bicycle pump
    Helmet- duh
    Eyewear (any glasses will do to keep dust, bugs, tree branches, etc out of your eyeballs)
    Water carrying- either a bottle and cage on your bike or a pack of some sort
    Gloves are a good idea. Hardwear store gloves work fine
    Lights- little blinky LED lights, white front and red rear, to make you more visible for drivers
    Basic tools- metric allens, screwdriver, chain lube, spare tube, etc.

    All of this stuff can be acquired cheap and you won't need to replace any of them soon.
    Awesome thanks! Is there a light that people recommend? I bought my oldest son a 20Ē hotrock (wish I found this forum then) a couple weeks ago and started looking for one but wasnít sure if I should just go w a Chinese brand off amazon or bite the bullet and get a brand name one from the LBS.

    Gloves, eyewear, tools are bought.

    Need a pump and helmet. Open to recs there too.

    Bag wise. I see pics of people w bags that take up the whole triangle. Are those bike specific or adjustable enough that theyíll work w most frames?

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_stoke View Post
    If you want to try out Singletrack take it to Bootleggers in Creve Coeur park. Simple, fun trail. If you like that get on GORCs website to find the rest of the trails in the area. Lot of good miles around St Louis. For what its worth, I ride a Krampus year round here on all the local gravel and Singletrack. That Jamis will be just fine for what you want to do.
    Nice! Iíll check out CC park...Iím in Chesterfield so itís literally right up the street. Stoke, huh? As in Stoke City Futbol? I know a couple stokies here myself.

  47. #47
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    Pump, look at Lezyne they have some good compact pumps.

    Helmet, Kali protectives has good affordable helmets, but go to Walmart to size up properly.

    Frame bag, I use Banjo Brothers, again affordable and practical.
    Surly Krampus
    All City MMD
    Kona Unit
    Surly Cross-Check

  48. #48
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    Lights- check out the lights and night riding sub-forum. If you just want to be more visible to motorists, you don't need much. If you want to ride challenging trails in total dark, you need a lot more.

    Helmets- try some on. I have tried a few and Giro helmets are the only ones that fit the shape of my skull. Everyone is different.

    Big frame bags are mostly useful to backpackers who need to carry a tons of gear for trips that last several days. Everything you need will fit in a little saddle bag or waist pack.

  49. #49
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    Oh yeah lights on the cheap NiteRider.
    Surly Krampus
    All City MMD
    Kona Unit
    Surly Cross-Check

  50. #50
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    For helmets, get a real mountain bike design with coverage for the back of your skull. You can get an inexpensive one, but donít skimp. It needs to fit properly for the shape of your head and cover the way itís supposed to. A Smith MIPS (multidirectional impact protection system) can be had for around $100.00. Which is actually a good deal. (I bought a new one a month ago), Iíve seen other MIPs helmets on Competitive Cyclist for $60.00. Doesnít have to be MIPS. But itís a nice feature. A decent pair of safety/cycling glasses that cover your eyes well On the sides, top, and bottom, and gloves are also included in the minimum safety gear requirements.

    But go to shops and try the helmets.

    Mechanix gloves look promising to me.

    You can look at Places like Jenson, Competive Cyclist, Modern Bikes, Niagara Cycle Works for the Ďrealí bike stuff. Just shop around and find sales. Donít overbuy. Using the stuff will tell you if you need something different or better. YouTube has a lot of bike wrench/mechanic stuff. And there are repair books out there, too. How mechanical you are will dictate a lot of your future tune ups. And you may want to find a local bike shop to help get the fit adjusted for you, etc. it will certainly help with comfort. But not everyone on here does that.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 2 Weeks Ago at 03:11 AM.

  51. #51
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    I see you have glasses and gloves. Cool.

    I got this Smith helmet last month. I tried all the helmets in the shop, and this was the only one that fit well. In fact, Smith has a lot of styles and price points, and the more expensive ones were uncomfortable.

    https://www.moosejaw.com/product/smi...E#addedFilters

    Avoid buying helmets online. A lot of vendors accept returns. And a helmet that has been crashed may not have visible damage, but it wonít protect your head well.

    Comfort: I have an oblong head. At one time, I had a too round helmet. I always had a dent in my forehead after wearing it. And too much room on the sides. A person with a rounder head wearing an oblong helmet might feel tight on the sides, and have too much room fore and aft. There also needs to be some dead space between your head and the inside of the helmet to protect in a crash. The MIPS system really makes this more obvious. Also, you want enough room to adjust the retainer so you can wear a fleece training beanie under the helmet in winter. Micro thin fleece beanies are perfect. Get one that covers your ears completely so you wonít be miserable. Consider that when you move, there is always wind chill. Amazon sells a lot of these beanies.

    Here is a good example.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00PVUR34K/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_8?smid=AUCI3SOXHH004&psc=1

    And I think I like this one even more.

    https://www.amazon.com/Cycling-Helmet-Bicycle-Thermal-Windproof/dp/B07Y4D9J31/ref=rtpb_16?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B07Y4D9J31&pd_r d_r=4c755f2d-576e-4bb6-9c45-b451f217379c&pd_rd_w=UPbqh&pd_rd_wg=qs8lE&pf_rd_p= 33ec42dd-24c1-42c5-a3dc-a0551322d7dc&pf_rd_r=Q7FK2VERDP5CP39BSXH4&refRID=X G1FY2PCPXNRKM6J1FDH&th=1&psc=1

  52. #52
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    Wow this forum has been such a help. Congrats to you guys! Iím going to keep firing away questions until someone tells me to shut up!

    Bike racks. I read through a thread where people seem to recommend the 1up-USA. Is that the consensus/necessary? As of now the only two bikes weíll be transporting are a 20Ē Hotrock and my 26+, however theyíll be an additional 24Ē in another couple years and possibly another adult bike. And theyíll be transported in a Jeep Grand Cherokee.

    Assembly. Iím assuming the bike will come disassembled. Will it require professional assembly and setup? Iím fairly proficient w tools and would have any tool I imagine necessary, but no speciality bike tools or stands.

    Whatís the rule of thumb as to when I would need a post break-in tune up?

    Again, I really appreciate all the help!

  53. #53
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    If you don't need the rack now ,you could wait. Saying that racks makes it easier to deal with loading and unloading. It depends on how much you trust your work, You tube and Park Tools have videos on bike assembly. There isn't a rule , how much you ride and under what kind of conditions you ride in determine when you need to do maintenance .

  54. #54
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    I think Jenson Cycles ship mostly assembled. But Iím not positive. Make sure important bolts are torqued to the correct pressure. I have a nice torque wrench set. Iím especially careful with the stem and headset. And seatpost. Obviously things like the crankset are critical, though I havenít done that type of thing.

    You may want to set up your tires as tubeless. That might be worthwhile to do in a shop as itís a huge mess.

    Bike fit adjustments. It takes a lot of experience to know exactly what stem length, seatpost offset, saddle tilt (and which saddle to replace it with if uncomfortable) etc. a professional bike fitting is worth paying for.

    The stem on a mountain bike can loosen slightly over time, much more quickly than a road bike due to terrain. Check from time to time that the handlebars are still straight, and not cocked to the side. That can actually cause pressure on your neck while riding.

    Pedals, saddle, and handlebars are the critical touch points for comfort. You may end up replacing all of these unless the stick ones feel good. I rather think the saddle that comes on this bike is an good overall one, meaning it works for a larger than average number of people. The pedals that come on bikes are considered demo pedals. And the handlebars on this bike are narrow for modern standards. And too straight for my tastes. I like a little offset for comfort. It does take time to figure out what exactly you want, so pay attention to how saddle and handlebars feel before buying something random. I would get the right pedals faster. Raceface Chesters are popular. I like DMR vaults. They are pricey, though.

    One tool you probably donít have is a Pedal Wrench. Though DMR pedals donít need one, they are attached with an Allen wrench.

    There are quite a few bike specific tools. I have no idea if there are any you will absolutely Ďneed.í Maybe to install a cassette. But I think that kind of thing will already be set up by Jenson.

    Also, you can get a Parks brand repair stand for 200ish dollars. Or a cheaper brand like this for half that.

    https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Mechanic-Bicycle-Repair-Stand/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=sxin_2_osp15-c735d057_cov?ascsubtag=c735d057-b21d-457a-8c90-222132716c37&creativeASIN=B00D9B7OKQ&cv_ct_id=amzn 1.osp.c735d057-b21d-457a-8c90-222132716c37&cv_ct_pg=search&cv_ct_wn=osp-search&keywords=bike+stand+repair&linkCode=oas&pd_ rd_i=B00D9B7OKQ&pd_rd_r=6974c920-56cb-4c35-be51-7906691c2553&pd_rd_w=PZtEH&pd_rd_wg=n53Il&pf_rd_p= 33b90d57-4392-4d9b-9557-da4c9de25645&pf_rd_r=974W6SBR59E1AH38H5ZV&qid=1570 272507&tag=ogl02-20

    I have this one, which is a fourth as much. But the one I linked to certainly looks good.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00OGO2LDA/ref=sspa_mw_detail_0?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Get one that has a V base like these, rather than a tripod that you trip over as you move around the bike.

  55. #55
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    Parks stuff: I like their tools, and there is a lot of bike wrench info on the company website. But if a non-bike specific equivalent can be had for less money, then I buy that.

    The AWS 10 folding hex set from Parks is small enough to carry easily in any seat pack. Itís my favorite multi-tool. Though it only has Allen keys. So not a real mult-tool. But I like it.

    For home-use, I have 6, 5, 4, and 3 mm P handle hex wrenches. They sell a full set with a stand. Havenít needed all the others, but if I did Iíd buy more. These are a lot easier to use on a bike than other wrenches. Though if you are going to be your own Ďwrenchí a full set may be in order. The ball on the end of the long side really makes a lot of adjustments easier. And so does the precision of the short side of the tool, for other angles.

    I had one of their 3 way hexes and didnít like it. Not easy to take with you, and a pain to use. After about 10 years I gave it away to a newbie who needed tools.

    Also, the MT-1 multi tool is the ultimate easy to carry tool. And itís not a bad thing to give to your little girl or boy. https://www.parktool.com/product/mul...ry=Multi-Tools

    For chain lube, I prefer the regular Parks lube to the fancy stuff. And dish soap to actually clean my bike and drivetrain. Also cheap small cleaning brushes from the Dollar store. There are a lot of expensive bicycle cleaners available, but Iíve never been able to make myself buy them. You probably understand not to spray water directly from the side, especially into the cassette and crankset, but to dribble from the top. And grease the pivot points after cleaning.

    A lot of people carry a chain tool and spoke wrench when they ride. Parks does have a multi tool that includes both, Iíd get that one because itís thin and strong. Easy to carry. Iíve had multi tools from other brands that fell apart.

  56. #56
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    Update? Did you get your bike?
    2018 Surly Karate Monkey 'dingle' speed
    2013 CAADX 105
    2012 Pinarello Quattro
    2002 Zurich LeMond

  57. #57
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    Thanks. Yeah, Iíve been waiting to update. The bike came in and the large frame is just a little too big. I have virtually no clearance when standing over the frame (less than an inch). I had them send me a medium that will be here Monday.

    I rode it around some (a few miles on pavement) and really enjoyed it. Unfortunately, that meant I couldnít return it though. And even if I could, the return shipping wouldíve been a lot. So Iím just going to sell it locally (have a friend interested).

    Iíll post some pics and update this thread next week when the medium comes in.

  58. #58
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    very over priced unfortunately for an out dated bike unless you are collecting that particular model
    17 Lynskey Fatskey
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    My Parts for sale link

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by akacoke View Post
    very over priced unfortunately for an out dated bike unless you are collecting that particular model
    He ended up ordering a bike from Jenson.

    Jmonolo, so youíll ride with a friend? Pretty cool. Too bad about the sizing. Sounds like Jenson didnít ask the right questions when having that discussion.

  60. #60
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    Muirenn gets the Harold helpful award for this thread. Nice work.

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