New here and to mountain biking- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New here and to mountain biking

    Hello guys I'm new to mountain biking and riding but it looks fun. I've already found a riding area near me called sugar loaf so I'm planning to check that out. I do have a couple questions about the bike I purchased. It's a 1991 diamond back axis. I was told some parts were added to it but not sure what. If anyone can give me some insight on this bike that'd be great or also Any tips for trail riding that I might need to know.


  2. #2
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    I'd get some platform pedals and maybe a new seat.. And ride it til you're ready for a new one and you can transfer those over to the new bike. And tips for riding? Don't fall too hard and get a patch kit and frame pump at the minimum.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    Yes, get better pedals to inspire confidence in your new sport. Don't have to be spendy, most bike shops have plastic platform pedals that are large and simulate the pins found on pricier pedals. They grip great and are cheap. I wouldn't suggest a new seat unless the one you have is not comfortable.

    Clean the grips with some carburator cleaner. They will become grippy again. If you know you can do more than a half hour on the trail, get a seat pack and throw a spare tube, tube repair kit, two plastic tire irons, and a bike multi-tool in it. You'll also want a tire pump, the ones that bolt behind a water bottle are great. Trust me when I say walking sucks... every half-hour down a trail can be a two hour walk out, and it's not like backpacking when you're dragging or carrying a disabled bike.

    Make sure the brakes and deraillers are adjusted properly, then go for it! You've got a great starter trail bike that will get you on your way.

    The tires did not come with the bike, Bontrager is a Trek thing. They are a soft, compliant and forgiving tire, great for a starter bike. Looks like you got the wheels that they were originally mounted on, too... I see that black line in the sidewall of the rim... you've got a good set of rollers there, same as on my son's 2010 Trek 4300.

    I would suggest adjusting the brake levers so they approach a 45 angle rather than facing nearly straight down as they are now. This "out of the way" position is not good for applying a lot of torque, which you are going to need with the cantilever brakes that are on the bike.

    If you can, replace those cantilever brakes with V-brakes. Most shop's carry the v-brake shimano still produces, it is cheap, and a very good brake. With about 2" of mechanical advantage over the canti's that are on your bike, it will be a major brake upgrade. If the levers you can have positions for both canti and v-brake cables, the brakes alone are about $12-15 each.

    Good luck, and welcome!
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  4. #4
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    Just go ride.

    The first thing my friend told me when I first started was that if I could get the front wheel through things, the rear would follow.

    There's more to good technique, but that's a start.

    Try not to throw too much money at this bike. (Though pedals would be good.) Focus on riding and developing some technique.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Just go ride.
    Try not to throw too much money at this bike. (Though pedals would be good.) Focus on riding and developing some technique.
    It is always good to focus on technique but I think a few things need to be bought for the bike in order to make it user friendly. The reason I say this is I spent a bit of time on a bike like that when I first started and if I had left it the way it was, I probably wouldn't have stuck it out. Pedals first, and I would recommend good pedals because when you buy your new bike you can swap them out. I really like the Truvativ Holzfeller with removable pins. About $100 retail. Look for sales and you can get them cheaper. If you buy cheap plastic pedals you might be slipping off the pedal, whacking your shins, and say screw this. Check the drive train and if things are worn you can swap the cassette and chain out pretty cheap on those. I did cassette, chain, and crank on the old Specialized Hardrock when I first got it and rode it hard till I bought the Trance. Put about $300 into it all told and it was worth every cent. But I wasn't interested in just getting by, you will never regret buying the very best. But I will say that you will never get the money out of it if you go to sell it, just do it for yourself. Slim

  6. #6
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    I don't know. There's a debate in another thread about plastic vs metal pedals.. I think for beginners especially plastic is much more forgiving on your shins than metal pins.. I used to use metal but switched to plastic. I don't slip off.. That's mainly a shoe issue. I ride with skate shoes they tend to grip really well and are flat so there aren't any weird contours on the bottom.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    Okay cool guys thanks for tip!! I'll definitely look into pedals and back up supplies to save me. Another thing. The shocks in the front are all oily around the whole shaft. Is that normal or do the seals need possible replacing. My dsd has a specialized rock hopper and his is way more stiff than mine but he is also alot bigger

  8. #8
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    That fork is done, but upgrading it would be silly. What brand model is it? I doubt there are rebuild kits for it

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  9. #9
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    I can't find any stamps or part numbers or any thing on the forks indicating brand

  10. #10
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    It's probably a low level fork.. Your cheapest bet would be to put a rigid fork on it, at least it'll be stable. On an old bike I had that was used as a backup with a similar fork years ago i took the spring out and put in a piece of pipe with some shims to make it a rigid for free..

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

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