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Thread: New-Bee in need

  1. #1
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    New-Bee in need

    I have been riding big box store Mongoose for a little over a year. Resently I got my hands on a 97 Gary Fisher Marlin. Of course it is in poor shape. Not horrible but needs some TLC. Local bike store charges more than I can afford to make the changes that I want, so being pretty handy myself I am going to take this on myself. I own a Trek 1200 road bike that is about to be on ebay to finance a rebuild of the Marlin. The Marlin is stock. My question is what size fork do I want to purchase? By that I mean is it a 1inch or 1 1/8. Also how do I know how long of a steering tube that I need? Do you guys recommend changing to a threadless headset? Any and all suggestions are welcome.

  2. #2
    ^ That's what I do
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    First of all, welcome to the forums. I'm pretty new to mountain biking too (only been doing it a few years) and this place has been a big help to me.

    As for your bike, what you really mean by fork is what's called a headset. It's the little thing that lives inside your bike's headtube (the short vertical tube on your frame that the fork comes out of). The fork attaches to the headset, which attaches to the stem, which attaches to the handlebars (kinda like the leg bone's connected to the knee bone ).

    I looked up your bike on BikePedia, and it says you need a 1 1/8" headset. I don't know if that's a threaded or threadless headset.
    '08 Specialized Rockhopper 29er (modified)

  3. #3
    No good in rock gardens..
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    According to Bikepedia the headset is 1 1/8" but it appears to be a threaded type. Most forks now are threadless, so if you want a modern fork you'll need to install a threadless headset.

    http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...rlin&Type=bike

    Steerer length - a ballpark figure would be to measure the head tube of the frame and add another 3" to allow for a headset at stem.
    Less isn't MOAR

  4. #4
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    First of all, what is your budget? It gets repeated here over and over, but you might be better off buying a new bike or a used one in better condition. If it needs a new fork, that alone will be expensive to replace.

    Does this list help you out?

    Looks like the steerer is 1 1/8, couldn't tell you the length. Are you familiar with bike repair with the road bike? Look at parktool.com if you need some help. I'm rebuilding a Trek 6000 now, it's getting much more expensive than I planned, but it is very rewarding.

    Do you have any pictures?

    Edit: looks like I got beat to the bikepedia link while I was typing this. haha.

  5. #5
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    You guys are a great help. My budget is rather tight at the moment. That being said The bike has been tuned by myself and all it really needs is a new fork. And the wheels need trueing. One more question-Is there any reason I should not run disk brakes on the front and V on the back?

  6. #6
    No good in rock gardens..
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccoiv
    You guys are a great help. My budget is rather tight at the moment. That being said The bike has been tuned by myself and all it really needs is a new fork. And the wheels need trueing. One more question-Is there any reason I should not run disk brakes on the front and V on the back?

    No real reason - it used to be fairly common when discs first started being specced. Be aware you'll need a new front disc hub and of course your new fork will need to be disc compatible (and most forks are now).

    I have to wonder if this amont of upgrade money might not be better spent on a whole new bike - upgrading to a decent fork and a front disc brake and hub and wheel rebuild will add up. Especially if you can sell that roadie to fund a new MTB.

    Just sayin....
    Less isn't MOAR

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sideknob
    No real reason - it used to be fairly common when discs first started being specced. Be aware you'll need a new front disc hub and of course your new fork will need to be disc compatible (and most forks are now).

    I have to wonder if this amont of upgrade money might not be better spent on a whole new bike - upgrading to a decent fork and a front disc brake and hub and wheel rebuild will add up. Especially if you can sell that roadie to fund a new MTB.

    Just sayin....

    Thank you sideknob. u have opened my eyes to a whole new option. I have done a little research and found a few used bikes in the same price range as up grades would cost me. this info will allow me to make a MUCH better decision.

    That being said I took the family to a local state park with a ton of trails. my 10 yr old daughter loved every minute of the trail. I have seen the future and they are fearless!

  8. #8
    No good in rock gardens..
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    Glad I could help. Even entry level bikes have come a long way since '97 and now you can get more bang for your buck off the shelf than ever before.
    Less isn't MOAR

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