Need some advice on seting up my suspention- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Need some advice on seting up my suspention

    I finally have gotten my bike all back together and now I need to dial in the suspention. My bike is a carbon Schwinn S20 with a Manitou R7 front fork and a Manitou rear air shock.

    What is the best way to get everything dialed? Do I make an adjustment, then ride, make another adjustment, take another ride, etc., and see what feels best? Or is there a better way?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Nice. Do you have any pictures? I <3 carbon Sweetspots.

    Which Manitou shock did you find that fit? Almost all of the 5.5" shocks available have only 1" of travel, which drops the rear travel of the bike to 3".

    The first thing you should do is set the sag both front and rear. Running about 25% is a goo starting point. On the rear, set it while seated. One the rear sag is set, adjust the rebound. Just ride off a curb while seated. The suspension should compress and then re-extend without any pogoing. Turn up the rebound damping until the pogoing goes away.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the advice bad mechanic! I'll have pictures tomorrow when I install my Edge 705. I'm not 100% sure on which fork I have. A good friend of mine works at Hayes so he built it for me. He told me it has 100mm of travel. I'll get more details tonight when he drops off a shock pump and my rear brake after bleeding it.

  4. #4
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    for the fork i just stand over the frame...grab a handful of front brake and jab the fork down...

    if it comes up faster than my hands I dial down the rebound...

    if it comes up slower than my hands I dial up the rebound....

    basically ya want it to come up as fast as your hands...it's a good starting point.


    now compression (rate of dive) settings are little trickier and require actually riding to dial in....
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  5. #5
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    I start with something -- either recommended sag, or recommended pressure for my weight.

    Then I ride around the house and over curbs to see how things feel. I focus on one end of the bike at a time. I add or subtract air until I like the result.

    Then I hit a trail. (I almost always dial-in rebound damping on the trail) Take a shock pump on your first few rides. Don't be afraid to stop and add or subtract air. Eventually, you'll work out some pressures that you like. Write those down for future reference.

    In fact, it's not a bad idea to run some tests at different pressures just to get a feel of how your fork and shock respond as you vary the pressure. Once I took a fork and test-rode it at five-pound increments from an obviously too low pressure until an obviously too high pressure. It took a couple hours of my afternoon to do that, but the results were illuminating.

    Above all, don't treat your suspension as some sort of magic black box that you should never touch once you get it set. I know a guy who sets his rebound and compression damping at exactly the number of clicks the LBS guys recommended to him once, and that's the end of it. I know another guy who doesn't even own a shock pump. He's ridden full-suspension for two seasons and maybe more, and he's never done any experimenting at all with pressure. Don't be like that. I'll tweak my rebound on the fly if I feel like it. And I don't even wince when some kids test-ride my bike and spin all the knobs, because I know I am comfortable in dialing things back in again.

  6. #6
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    Sorry to resurrect such an old thread, but this was the closest I got when searching for my particular question: how much nose dive while under moderate front wheel braking is considered normal? Or is this all user preference? I have my front fork set to the manufacturer's recommended psi but I feel like it gives the fork too much "play," especially under braking situations.

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