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  1. #1
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    My first upgrade

    Hello all,
    It's been a while since i've been on the forums lately, I can't get enough of biking! So here's wats up. I current have a used GT I-drive 5 2.0 06 i beleive and some components are wearing down.

    1. Tires seem to slip a lil more
    2. Cable housing is screwed up causing delay in shifting
    3. Handlebar Grips have been warn down
    4. Rear brake needs to be bleed

    Now I know for sure that i'm going to fix my brake on my bike priorities list, but I dont know what to do afterwards. I'm wondering if I should spend more money replacing tires or cables or i can save money and just replace grips. My question is what should I fix other than the brake?

    Thanks,
    Sisco

  2. #2
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    You should fix it all.

    After the brake, I would think that tires should be your priority. They'll also be your biggest expense. You can get a new set of cable housing for $25, and lock-on grips for under $20. Regular grips for under $10. If you shop around, you can probably get even better prices on these things. Heck, save even more money and get a bleed kit for your brakes and do it yourself. I know that bike stuff is expensive, but if you're patient you can get great deals that will allow you to do all the upgrades you need. Start with pricepoint, chainlove, jensonusa, nashbar and performancebike. They all have great specials if you look hard enough.
    2008 Specialized Safire Comp

  3. #3
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    NEW TIRES = TUBELESS.

    TUBELESS = AMAZING.

    Get rid of the tubes - now's the chance!
    A medical student who wandered into Iowa

  4. #4
    Gig'em Aggies!
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    You tube your brakes to see how to bleed them yourself. I have Hope Mono Mini's and spent $5 for brake fluid and a hose and then bled my brakes myself. Otherwise, it would have cost $25 per brake at my LBS. After you bleed the brakes yourself, spend money on a good set of tubeless tires and some of this.

  5. #5
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    I'm just posting to derail the tubeless bandwagon...just get new tires (and maybe new tubes) and make the other repairs on your list...

  6. #6
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    I actually just checked out my tires and it seemed to be fine, how do you know when you need to replace your tires? And how do you go tubeless?

  7. #7
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    I knew I needed to replace the tires on my brand new bike when they kept slipping and making me fall. Rode it twice and new they had to go!

  8. #8
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    Tire replacement is a bit of a personal choice. I like trying to squeeze as much life as I can out of a tire (sometimes a little too much).

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by siscoOGpimp
    I actually just checked out my tires and it seemed to be fine, how do you know when you need to replace your tires? And how do you go tubeless?
    I replace my tires when I start losing performance. If they start to spin out on climbs they normally would stick to it's time to replace. If the knobs get worn down more than 1/3 of the way I replace, but keep the old tires for training on the road so I don't wear down my new tires.

    Going tubeless is easiest if you buy a Stans kit - you'll replace your current rim strip with the tuebless strip in the pack, put in a specialized Presta valve that makes it possible to pump up the tire, then you'll put some sealant in the tires and mount them onto the rim, blow some air into the tires with a compressor to seat the beads and then you'll swish the sealant around and ride. Now you'll be able to run super low pressures (20 psi) because you won't get pinch flats. They also roll faster and are lighter without the tubes - this you'll feel.

    But... you need tubeless rims.
    A medical student who wandered into Iowa

  10. #10
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    Ghetto Tubeless

    There are tons of posts with directions for the do-it-yourself tubeless method commonly called Ghetto Tubeless. You can use regular rims and regular tires and you can mix up your own sealant from relatively common materials.

    Here's a link to the directions I followed:
    http://mtnbiker72.blogspot.com/2009/...o-and-rim.html

    My alterations to the given method - I used 1 part mold builder, 1 part slime, 1 part undiluted ethylene glycol antifreeze (the old "regular" antifreeze) and 1 part water. Use 20" bicycle tubes to make the rim liners, and if you buy them new look for tubes that don't have a large rubber bulge around the stem. When you get it all put together with the solution inside the tire, squirt a bead of clear silicone caulk between the tire and the tube/rim-strip to help seal in the air as the tire is forming a bead-seal. After the tire inflates, wipe away the excess silicone with a rag.

    Addressing the nay-sayers: Yes, tubes are simpler, and no, there is not a great weight savings from tubeless, but calculate the time/cost/frustration factor of a lifetime of periodic flats from thorns, pinch flats, etc. Also, you can run INSANELY low tire pressure without the negative consequences (pinch flats) associated with doing so using tubes - this allows you to climb like crazy with traction that will make a mountain goat jealous.
    Vehor vivo est!

  11. #11
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    Go to walmart! I bought a Bell, full brake/shifting cable set WITH housings for about 5 bucks! I use it as my backup considering i'm running Hyrdos. But definitely go pick that Bell up! Hella lot cheaper than the LBS' price for housings/cables.

    I just changed out my tires and went to Panaracer Fire XC Pro's. I recommend them and their on sale for 24.99 a pop at performancebike.com!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SycoCell121
    ...I bought a Bell, full brake/shifting cable set WITH housings for about 5 bucks! I use it as my backup considering i'm running Hyrdos. ..
    Dude, you're gonna have to enlighten me.

    How, exactly, is a set of cables/housings a "backup" to your hydraulic brakes? If you blow a hydraulic brake line, it's not like you'll just "throw a cable on there" to fix it up.

  13. #13
    local trails rider
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    Replace whatever bothers YOU most.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker
    Dude, you're gonna have to enlighten me.

    How, exactly, is a set of cables/housings a "backup" to your hydraulic brakes? If you blow a hydraulic brake line, it's not like you'll just "throw a cable on there" to fix it up.
    dude, i do that all the time. You remove the old hose, put the cable in the little hole you just removed the hose from, and then squeeze superglue into the caliper to seal it all up. Just gotta be careful not to get glue on the rotor, or you'll be in real trouble!

    ps. if your brakes feel soft, add more glue

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SycoCell121
    Go to walmart! I bought a Bell, full brake/shifting cable set WITH housings for about 5 bucks! I use it as my backup considering i'm running Hyrdos. But definitely go pick that Bell up! Hella lot cheaper than the LBS' price for housings/cables.

    I just changed out my tires and went to Panaracer Fire XC Pro's. I recommend them and their on sale for 24.99 a pop at performancebike.com!
    Not sure about the performance of those cables, but if they are the same as the cablesets at canadian tire here i wouldnt put them on my bike. The quality is simply too low. Go to your lbs and just pick up a few shifter cables and some housing, shifting will be smoother and they will last longer than the walmart cables.
    As for tires, I switched out my tires when i got my first bike (also used) because i thought they were worn. In reality, I just didnt have the technique down. Now i climb hills with worn semislicks that i wouldnt have made it up with the grippiest tires a few years ago. However, it could be that your tires are really worn. The front usually wears slower than the rear, so if your tires are not front/rear specific, you can just move your front tire to the rear and buy a new tire for the front.

    so in summary:
    1- brakes obviously
    2-spend the money on shifter cables/housing. This wont cost much and good shifting is essential
    3- switch your front tire to the rear and buy a new tire for the front
    4- get some nice lock-on grips- Dont cheap out and read some reviews, a good grip makes more difference than you think, and lock-on grips are great if you want to remove/replace shifters or brakes at some point.

  16. #16
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    Lol nooooo.. I said that incorrectly. I used to use mechanical discs. But now I just have the cables/housings from bell for backup on my shifters, not my hydros. I'm not THAT stupid.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by beereppc
    Not sure about the performance of those cables, but if they are the same as the cablesets at canadian tire here i wouldnt put them on my bike. The quality is simply too low. Go to your lbs and just pick up a few shifter cables and some housing, shifting will be smoother and they will last longer than the walmart cables.
    As for tires, I switched out my tires when i got my first bike (also used) because i thought they were worn. In reality, I just didnt have the technique down. Now i climb hills with worn semislicks that i wouldnt have made it up with the grippiest tires a few years ago. However, it could be that your tires are really worn. The front usually wears slower than the rear, so if your tires are not front/rear specific, you can just move your front tire to the rear and buy a new tire for the front.

    so in summary:
    1- brakes obviously
    2-spend the money on shifter cables/housing. This wont cost much and good shifting is essential
    3- switch your front tire to the rear and buy a new tire for the front
    4- get some nice lock-on grips- Dont cheap out and read some reviews, a good grip makes more difference than you think, and lock-on grips are great if you want to remove/replace shifters or brakes at some point.
    The quality is great. As I said, it's not some walmart brand. It's a major biking brand; Bell. I have used them many times. The LBS just over-charges for things like that IMO.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SycoCell121
    The quality is great. As I said, it's not some walmart brand. It's a major biking brand; Bell. I have used them many times. The LBS just over-charges for things like that IMO.
    The fact that is a Bell branded cable and Bell makes some good products (ie. helmets) doesnt mean its a high quality cable. Many reputable companies have 'budget' products and thats fine. I dont believe walmart would sell high performance shifter cables simply because the average consumer is just looking for cheap cables for their commuter/$100 walmart bike. You do not want those cables on your expensive mountain bike because the shifting performance will be poor, will last less long, and will be heavier. That being said, I cant say for sure that those are crap cables since I havent seen or used them.

  19. #19
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    I would be leary of any cable housing that claims it can be used for deraileur AND brake.

    In general, brake cable housing is much sturdier than deraileur cable housing, and good quality housing is labled as either deraileur housing or brake housing.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by beereppc
    dude, i do that all the time. You remove the old hose, put the cable in the little hole you just removed the hose from, and then squeeze superglue into the caliper to seal it all up. Just gotta be careful not to get glue on the rotor, or you'll be in real trouble!

    ps. if your brakes feel soft, add more glue
    How do you get all of the air out of the cable?

  21. #21
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    I realize its not anything fancy, thus why i said i use it for spare. But as far as performance, a cable is a cable. As far as housing, yeah it may not slide as well through it, but again, i'm only using it as spare. I ride a $3000 bike, I wouldn't skip out on good parts. But for spare, yes, i will save there.

  22. #22
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    I've used the Bell wires for a couple of hard tail builds. I also keep an extra package in my supplies.

    Are they the best thing out there?
    No.

    Are they the best thing out there when it's Sunday 5PM and you want to go for a ride?
    YES!

    Heck, I keep spare cheapie pedals too!

    It comes with 2 brake lines, 2 shifter lines, wire caps & cable housing end caps. The cable housing is the older sprial wound.

    BTW, I hate wire caps. I go to an electronics store and purchase high quality heat shrink and heat shrink the last inch.

    Hardwarz

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardwarz
    ...It comes with 2 brake lines, 2 shifter lines...
    Oh, ok. I thought he meant that he got a roll of cable/housing and it was labled for deraileur or brake use.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker
    I would be leary of any cable housing that claims it can be used for deraileur AND brake.

    In general, brake cable housing is much sturdier than deraileur cable housing, and good quality housing is labled as either deraileur housing or brake housing.
    Yes, brake and derailleur housing require different kinds of "strength".. Deraileur housing needs to be compressionless, but not that strong (the cable is never pulled very hard). Brake housing needs to be very strong as the cable is put under great tension, but it does not mattter as much if there is a little compression in the housing. This is who derailleur housing has strands going parallel with the cable, while brake housing has a coil wind around the cable.

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