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Thread: MTBR Glossary

  1. #301
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    5 minute on this post, worth it!! thx mate!

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    OEM

    In the car world it means original equipment manufacturer. Same thing here? I keep seeing people refer to components from certain online retailers as OEM.

  3. #303
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    MTBR Glossary

    Quote Originally Posted by Zachua View Post
    OEM

    In the car world it means original equipment manufacturer. Same thing here? I keep seeing people refer to components from certain online retailers as OEM.
    Yup, and mostly just OE (original equipment). Also sometimes you'll see Take-Off, which is a part that has been taken off a bike and put for sale, often new or in very good condition, but not necessarily an OE part, since many particular seller will do this as well as retailers. Even more, both OE and Take-Off parts will not come with any retail packaging or user manual/documentation, as well as extras or supplied parts (like an allen/torx wrench for disc brake kit). However, OE and new Take-Off should always be brand new never used and come with the same warranty (if sold ** a retailer) as normal, unless specified.
    Last edited by David C; 02-03-2013 at 01:24 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  4. #304
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    Thanks very much. I'm sure I'll be referring back to this quite often for awhile.

  5. #305
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    This is great info. Thanks all!

  6. #306
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    This helps quite a bit...

  7. #307
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    Ah there were a few I was wondering about. Cheers

  8. #308
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    Good Stuff

  9. #309
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    Thanks for the info.

  10. #310
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    glad I saw this thread

  11. #311
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    OEM
    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Yup, and mostly just OE (original equipment). Also sometimes you'll see Take-Off, ...
    ... both OE and Take-Off parts will not come with any retail packaging or user manual/documentation, as well as extras or supplied parts...
    Another thing is: OEM tends to refer to the BIKE manufacturer, not the component manufacturer.

    Component manufacturers sometimes supply large bike companies with parts that are made to the bike company's specs, and are not available elsewhere. For example, an OEM fork might have a different set of features, compared with forks that are otherwise available. Or an OEM shock might have some special tuning tailored for a particular bike design (and less suited for some other design).

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  12. #312
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    Very Helpful

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    Very Informational!

  14. #314
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    PITA to have to learn all these acronyms, IMO.

    THX OP.

    I got hung up on stupid things like the difference between rigid and HT and also getting to know if there was any difference between 15QR and 15mm TA.

    Wait until you get to all the #s like 31.6, 31.8, 30.9, 27.2, 34.9, 68/73mm, 156Q, 56ZS, 49EC, 44IS, 57-599, 1/2" x 3/32", 180/185mm, 120/80 BCD, DOT 4, DOT 4.1, DOT 5, 1.2mm x 2000, etc. Watch out for mixed metric/imperial measurements and conversions... 5" of travel is how much in mm, 120, 125, or 127mm?

    Watch out for all the brand specific acronyms too, like RLC, RC2, RC3, RCT3, TST, BB30, PF30, PF92, BB95, etc.

    Then there's always the frame fit jargon, like SO, ST, HT, ETT, etc.

    Deciding to buy a frame, after buying and riding an used high performance bike and getting spoiled by nice parts, and comparing to other frames and then deciding to spec it nicely, has been fairly complex learning experience. I could probably spend another week surfing this board, but in the end, I bet I will still find myself to be stupid and uninformed, unable to find answers to any of my questions really, and with an emptying bank account. I don't think others with 1000s of posts and years of surfing this forum are really any better off than me, except maybe they learned to close their minds after allowing all this questionable knowledge swell their heads.
    Last edited by dv8xin; 03-23-2013 at 12:04 AM.

  15. #315
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    MAMIL - middle-aged men in lycra.

    Found it in a bike review quote, "balanced and comfortable enough to get the most hamfisted MAMIL to the end of a sportive feeling like a pro."

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    Quote Originally Posted by dv8xin View Post
    MAMIL - middle-aged men in lycra.

    Found it in a bike review quote, "balanced and comfortable enough to get the most hamfisted MAMIL to the end of a sportive feeling like a pro."
    ...And lookin' like a dummy.
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  17. #317
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    Nice work!
    Here's my take on a few that I disagree about.

    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Quick facts :


    • Do not remove factory lube from a new chain, just wipe off excess with a rag when getting dirty.
      factory chain lube is good for keeping a chain new on the shelf. it prevents corrosion. It is also good for ensuring that any dirt that gets near your chain clings to it and works its way inside the chain. Leave it on at your own risk
    • 1/2" pedals threads are mainly for BMX use. 9/16" threads are more common for MTB and road use.
      1/2" pedal threads are for 1 piece cranks (only on the cheapest modern bikes) typically and 9/16" threads go with essentially all nicer cranks; there is not a distinction between bmx and mtb.
    • Seat post should be inserted at least to the minimum insertion length and better if long enough to go past the seat tube - top tube junction of the frame to ensure maximum strength and prevent frame fatigue.
      minimum insertion marks on the post are for the integrity of the post. For conventional frames, ensure that your post is inserted to go at least a half inch beyond the bottom wall of the top tube, where it meets the seattube; ultimately the frame mfg may have a different recommendation than the seatpost mfg. make sure both are met.
    • Put a protector on the chainstay of your bike to prevent the chain from damaging it. A simple inner tube can be wrapped around with zip ties.
      this is only necessary for bikes that use springs to tension the chain. for many single speeds, this doesn't matter.

  18. #318
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    Quote Originally Posted by PretendGentleman View Post
    Nice work!
    Here's my take on a few that I disagree about.

    factory chain lube is good for keeping a chain new on the shelf. it prevents corrosion. It is also good for ensuring that any dirt that gets near your chain clings to it and works its way inside the chain. Leave it on at your own risk
    Here's my take on one thing that I disagree about.

    All major chain manufacturers state that their Factory Lubes are probably the best thing for the internals of the chain.... as long as it lasts.

    The thing about exterior gunk is a very much separate thing. Wipe off the stuff from the exterior of the chain, maybe even with a rag that is wet with WD-40, or something. Add a thin layer of dry or waxy lube (maybe). But don't go soaking off the greasy stuff from the interior of the chain, until you have a good reason to.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  19. #319
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    DINK - dual income, no kids

    "the stereotypical, middle-aged DINK who always has the latest gear despite carrying five extra kilos of body mass and displaying the handling prowess of a giraffe on a skating rink."
    I like to jump to conclusions, oversimplify, gossip, and participate in popularity polls.

  20. #320
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    Forgive me if these questions have been answered on pages 2-11 but I didn't want to spend all day reading them. I was heavily into the MTB scene from 1990-1994 but sort of fell out out of it, then recently I've been getting back into it. As most FS bikes look the same to me (there's the ones that just look like bikes with a rear shock, then the bikes that look like motorcycles with no motors), I'm finding the miriad of MTB classifications confusing.

    1) Can a FS (full suspension) bike be considered XC?
    2) Can a hardtail be considered All Mountain?
    3) What are the differences between All Mountain, Over Mountain, Trail and Enduro?

  21. #321
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    MTBR Glossary

    Quote Originally Posted by Racnad View Post
    Forgive me if these questions have been answered on pages 2-11 but I didn't want to spend all day reading them. I was heavily into the MTB scene from 1990-1994 but sort of fell out out of it, then recently I've been getting back into it. As most FS bikes look the same to me (there's the ones that just look like bikes with a rear shock, then the bikes that look like motorcycles with no motors), I'm finding the miriad of MTB classifications confusing.

    1) Can a FS (full suspension) bike be considered XC?
    2) Can a hardtail be considered All Mountain?
    3) What are the differences between All Mountain, Over Mountain, Trail and Enduro?
    1 and 2, yes.

    3, they are pretty much all about riding bikes over chunky stuff and having a blast. Others will chime in on this. Endure is pretty much a competition though.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dv8xin View Post
    PITA to have to learn all these acronyms, IMO.

    THX OP.

    I got hung up on stupid things like the difference between rigid and HT and also getting to know if there was any difference between 15QR and 15mm TA.

    Wait until you get to all the #s like 31.6, 31.8, 30.9, 27.2, 34.9, 68/73mm, 156Q, 56ZS, 49EC, 44IS, 57-599, 1/2" x 3/32", 180/185mm, 120/80 BCD, DOT 4, DOT 4.1, DOT 5, 1.2mm x 2000, etc. Watch out for mixed metric/imperial measurements and conversions... 5" of travel is how much in mm, 120, 125, or 127mm?

    Watch out for all the brand specific acronyms too, like RLC, RC2, RC3, RCT3, TST, BB30, PF30, PF92, BB95, etc.

    Then there's always the frame fit jargon, like SO, ST, HT, ETT, etc.

    Deciding to buy a frame, after buying and riding an used high performance bike and getting spoiled by nice parts, and comparing to other frames and then deciding to spec it nicely, has been fairly complex learning experience. I could probably spend another week surfing this board, but in the end, I bet I will still find myself to be stupid and uninformed, unable to find answers to any of my questions really, and with an emptying bank account. I don't think others with 1000s of posts and years of surfing this forum are really any better off than me, except maybe they learned to close their minds after allowing all this questionable knowledge swell their heads.
    When most all bikes had a horizontal top tube, frame size was the distance between the center of the bottom bracket and the top of the top top. These days with sloping top tube and other exotic designs there's no standard for bike frame sizes. Add to that the fact that different people have different inseam, body and arm reach porportions, and these affect bike fit. Two people of the same height may not fit optimumly on the same bike. The only thing bike size labels are good for is a rough guide of which bikes in a shop you should try out.

  23. #323
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    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    1 and 2, yes.

    3, they are pretty much all about riding bikes over chunky stuff and having a blast. Others will chime in on this. Endure is pretty much a competition though.
    By today's definitions, would my 2002 Cannondale Jekyll be considered XC or AM?

  24. #324
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    MTBR Glossary

    By today's definition, your bike is still for the same usage as when it was designed 12 years ago.

    My 2000 dual suspension XC bike is still for XC.
    Last edited by David C; 08-06-2013 at 06:21 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  25. #325
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    Silly me! I thought these words all came into use during the past few years. I was looking though old files and found the 2002 Cannondale catalog from when I was last seriously shopping for a new bike. The Gemini was called "Freeride" and the Jekyll & Super-V were under "All Mountian." Way to pay attention!

  26. #326
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    CHUM = Cycling Has an Ugly Moderator


    (just kiddin' Nick - you are pretty)
    SMT = Shiver me Timbers
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  27. #327
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    Re: MTBR Glossary

    What is EBB?
    What works for me may not work for you. What's best for you depends on many factors. We are different from each other.

  28. #328
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    Eccentric Bottom Bracket - offset BB that can be used to tension a chain, is the most common use. think of a cam

  29. #329
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    Get connected, to a similar link.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/general-discu...ighlight=slang
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  30. #330
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    Helpful thread for noobs like me.

  31. #331
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    cool ... appreciated a lot....

  32. #332
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    Perhaps a mod could edit the thread to update as necessary / new thread managed by an active member.
    My team is running/biking 185 miles each for wounded veterans!

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    Pledge $2 to my cause!
    (until July 2016)

  33. #333
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    great info!

  34. #334
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    Good to Know

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    Glad I joined this forum, thanks!

  36. #336
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    Thanks for the info!

  37. #337
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    More helpful info. Great!

  38. #338
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    Need clarification on what *exactly* Braaaaap means.

    A) Sound that a tire makes when it is pushed to its limits
    B) Sound of a 2 stroke gasoline engine
    C) Other (explain)

    Need a definition check for: "50:01" - Love back wheel.
    - Apparently it stands for the ratio for the percentage of weight placed on the rear wheel, and to the front, implying riding the back wheel with the front having only enough weight to not keep it from flying backwards in a manual.

    Also need a nomenclature check on the nut that tightens down a tubeless valve. Valve lock nut?
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

  39. #339
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Need clarification on what *exactly* Braaaaap means
    Sound of an accelerating 4 stroke motorcycle. Often mistakenly used as the sound of a smoker, when anyone has raced knows that 2 strokes are "ring dingers". Drives me nuts.

    "Braaaaaap" = riding hard

  40. #340
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    nice post.

  41. #341
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    Awesome

  42. #342
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    Took me a bit to figure out what DJ was...

  43. #343
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    Disc jockey, duh. Love me some disc jockey bikes

  44. #344
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    Yup. I'm partial to the Kona "Wolfman Jack" and the Cannondale "Rick Dees", myself.

  45. #345
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    Thanks for the insight!

  46. #346
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    Good stuff! More forums should have this.

  47. #347
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    Very helpful! TY

  48. #348
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    This is helpful. Thanks!

  49. #349
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    Cleared some things up for me. Thanks!

  50. #350
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  51. #351
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    Good post to read.

    Thanks for the info!

  52. #352
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    This is great I was wondering what half the lingo was o was reading! Thanks

  53. #353
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    Good stuff thanks for the info! 👍

  54. #354
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    From the OP, does it really require 100 reputation points to gain one green square on your reputation bar?

    Appearently I don't have any street/trail Cred (rep) here even though I have been a member Before MTBR started pointing out members "join date". It was uphill both ways in the snow back then for me.....(2002ish)

  55. #355
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    Very helpful. Thanks

  56. #356
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    thanks for the insight very helpful to a new guy like me

  57. #357
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    Great info , thanks!

  58. #358
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    Spell check: climbable or climable?

  59. #359
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    Quote Originally Posted by dv8zen View Post
    Spell check: climbable or climable?
    Able to be climbed.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  60. #360
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    Had to look up some of these XC race acronyms, and figured that I'd learn 'em all and share.

    Cross country Olympic: XCO (multiple laps around a moderate length course)
    Cross country marathon: XCM (1 or more laps around a very long course)
    Cross country short circuit: XCC (multiple laps around a short course)
    Cross country eliminator: XCE (4-man 1 lap race on a short XCE-specific course, usually with artificial obstacles)
    Cross country team relay: XCR (individuals from a team take turns riding as many laps as possible in a certain time period, such as 24-hour)
    Cross country stage race: XCS (multiple XC races strung together back-to-back, usually XCP and XCT style and usually multi-day; ex. Belgian Mountainbike Challenge, bc bike race)
    Cross country point-to-point: XCP (race with a starting point different from ending point)
    Cross country time trial: XCT* (racing against the clock, staggered starts)
    * can also be cross country tour, which is a race series season that visits many locations over a region (USA cycling)

    EWS - Enduro World Series. The big league of Enduro racing, visiting locations from all over the world

    Downhill Individual: DHI (staggered 1-by-1 start DH time trial race on a fairly short DH-specific course, ex. DH world champs 2011, DH world champs 2008)
    Downhill Marathon: DHM (mass start DH race over a very long distance, ex. Megavalanche)

    Not sure if there's an acronym for Urban DH, Observed Trials, and the judged style events.

  61. #361
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    Thanks. I have an old SainTropez curb winder that will cost about $140 to tune up, tires, brakes, line. The bike place where Id go said they have a Ross Mt St; Helens refurbished for $85. Does anyone know which is the BETTER bike?? Thanks.

  62. #362
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    Quote Originally Posted by roy harley View Post
    From the OP, does it really require 100 reputation points to gain one green square on your reputation bar?

    Appearently I don't have any street/trail Cred (rep) here even though I have been a member Before MTBR started pointing out members "join date". It was uphill both ways in the snow back then for me.....(2002ish)
    It's been a while since the RepGate incident and thereafter it became official that reputations points were irrelevant to our community. And yes I believe each green square is worth 100 points and there's a maximum quantity of green squares, but no rep point limit.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  63. #363
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    Studying thanks

  64. #364
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    thanks

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    Good job!

    Very nice !

  66. #366
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    Pretty much covers everything

  67. #367
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    Okay, I read the stickys in beginners corner. This was good cause the glossary is already a big help. I've been a trail rider forever. Mostly cutting my own path or grabbing hidden hiking trails. I've wanted to make some changes to my bike but know very little about what to get or where. I didn't even know what most of these things are called. Because of the glossary, I at least know I'm looking for a 1x9 drivetrain. How do I know what fits? How do I know what I need to protect it.
    I'm hoping I can learn from the people here. I'm mechanically inclined and can learn. I like working on my own stuff. I just don't know the details etc.

  68. #368
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    I would like to close a thread that i started. I looked but i have not found where to click. Thanks for your help.

  69. #369
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    What's the name of the center channel of a rim's tire bed? It's the "gutter" that you squeeze a tire into, in order to get the tire over the rim flange

    Also, why are the rim flanges called "hookless beads"? Is it like the clipless thing, where a bead hook became hookless, so you end up with a weird ass word?

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    New question here. Huck to Flat

    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Hi, I though this could be helpful for some people who are new to MTBR or even MTB.

    Kinda throw in what I've learned while being new here and to mountain bike.

    Feel free to correct or add

    So here's some basic definitions and/or explanations of many terms people could encounter on the forums and some basic components descriptions...

    • MTBR : eMpTy BeeR
    • LBS : Local bike shop
    • FS : Front suspension bike or now more commonly used as Full Suspension bike.
    • HT : Hard tail bike, now more used to describe front suspension only bike then FS, because Hard tail bikes were introduced before full suspension bikes.
    • SS : Single Speed bike.
    • Niner : Name of a company who manufacture bike that are builder around 29" diameter wheels. Also used to describe 29" wheel bikes.
    • BB : Bottom Bracket, where the crank axle is attached to the frame.
    • SAG : Percentage of the bike travel that should be used when simply siting down on the bike. It's used to help adjusting suspension settings to prevent full compression on big hits and too stiff suspension adjustments.
    • RD : Rear derailleur, or also rear der.
    • FD : Front Derailleur, or also front der.
    • 20 QR & 15 QR : Heavy wheel axles that are 20mm and 15mm diameter that the dropout clamps on.
    • QR : Quick release.
    • Canti : Cantilever brakes.
    • Shock measurement example : 9.5 x 3.0 shock with 350 x 2.8 spring
      9.5 is the measurement in inches between the 2 mounting point of the shock, aka eye to eye measurement.
      3.0 is the stroke of the shock, so the shock can retract of 3 inches when fully compressed.
      350 is the rate of the spring in lbs per inch, so the spring needs a force of 350 lbs to compress itself by one inch.
      2.8 is the stroke of the spring, in inch, that the spring can compressed by the designated spring rate.
      So the shock is 9.5" eye to eye, have a stroke of 3" and use a spring that can be compressed to 2.8" by apply force at a rate of 350 lbs per inch.
    • Tire size example : 26x2.1 the tire is made for a 26" diameter rim and has a maximum width of 2.1" when inflated.
    • Hex key : Hexagonal screwdriver tip use for hexagonal head type screw, aka Allen key.
    • Small, Medium and Long cage : Lenght of the rear derailleur cage.
    • Drive train setup example : 1x9 or 2x10, or 3x9 are common drive train setup. 1x9 is 1 crank ring with 9 cogs cassette, 2x10 is 2 ring crank with 10 cogs cassette and 3x9 is 3 ring crank with 9 cogs cassette. May vary.
    • Crank measurement example : 22-32-42 175mm. 22-32-42 are the number if teeth on each ring if the crank, the smaller (inner) ring has 22 teeth, the medium (middle) ring has 32 and the bigger (outer) ring has 42. 175 mm is the length of the crank's arms from the BB axle to the pedal axle.
    • A to C or Axle to Crown length is the measurement of the distance between the wheel's axle and the crown of the fork, basically used to ensure good geometry when choosing a fork (suspension or rigid).
    • Rigid : Usually used to describe a bike that does not use suspension components.
    • Ti : Titanium
    • CF : Carbon Fiber
    • Cromo or Cr : Metal named Chromolium, which is a grade of steel that is more adapted to frame between alu and steel applications... lighter then steel, but stronger then alu.

    edit :
    • MUP : multi use path.
    • PC : Use in paint context for Powder Coat.
    • RAW : Type of finish for metal, commonly for frames, but also components, which is to completely remove any paint or color to get the metal to it's original finish prior to the factory paint or coating. Can also be polish to have a mirror like finish.
    • Mech and hydro or mechanical and hydraulic : 2 different types of brake system, usually disc brake. Mechanical brake use cable pull to actuate the caliper (disc brake) or the brake post (v-brake, canti). Hydraulic brake used fluid power to push the pistons inside the caliper to move the braking pad against the rotor (disc brake), or against the wheel's rim (sort of hydro v-brake).
    • DH : Downhill. Type of riding that consist in a gravity based trail setup where the main goal is to complete the descent in the faster time or to enjoy it to the max by taking high risk in cornering and jumping. This type of bike generally use 200mm of travel or more and weight between 34-38 lbs.
    • FR : Freeride. Type of riding that came from DH riders who wanted a more solid, maneuverable bike that can be used without lift assistance and perform better at slower speed. This type of bike generally use bigger frame, 160 to 180 mm travel and usually weight more then a DH bike, from 36 to 40 lbs. This bike can be pedaled up hill easier then a DH one, but is not totally appropriated for pure DH, as the rider position and travel is more for all around jumping and big hits at slow speed instead of fast, purposed made bike trails.
    • AM : All Mountain. This type of riding was introduce to designate a new kind of extended travel trail bikes, as AM bike use about 140mm to 160mm travel with lighter frame to maximize the climbing efficiency and provide safe and fun descents while being able to go on about any kind of rough terrains. This kind of bike can weight between 27 lbs and 34 lbs, depending on the travel amount and if using a carbon frame and other high end components.
    • XC : Cross Country. This type of bike was first introduced as a front suspension bike, or hardtail (full rigid XC bike also exist before and now) and is designed for light to medium trail riding with an ability to handle road riding with ease. Those bike usually use about 80 to 120mm travel, while extreme XC bike might use up to 130mm, which make them more of a trail bike then XC bike. This bike can weight less the 20 lbs (front suspension or rigid) and up to 27 lbs (full suspension). Low end ones can get over the 27 lbs limit with low end components and frame.
    • CX : Cyclocross. (old European off road racing format, bikes can be practical for roads and easy trails)
    • Slope-style (SS) : Sort of Dirt Jumping and FR cross, going for big tricks.
    • Chainline : Alignment of the chain between the front ring and rear cog. Often use in SS.
    • Lefty : Fork developed by Cannondale that only use the left side portion of the fork in order to make it lighter and reduce friction and stress on the fork when compressing during a turn.
    • Stem dimensions example : Threadless 1" 1/8 by 90mm with 6 rise and 25.4mm clamp.
      The "threadless" stands for a steerer tube that do not attach to the frame, but hold in the headset by the stem clamping on it and the top cap compressing the assembly. "Threaded" mean that the steerer tube contains outside threads at its top end for a threaded headset to engage the threads and hold the tube in place. Both type cannot have the same components, so you must use "threadless" only parts with "threadless" tube or only "threaded" parts with "threaded" tubes. Anyway, both cannot even be put in place together. (adaptor may exist for particular cases)
      1" 1/8 is the steerer tube diameter in inch. The most common size in MTB is the 1" 1/8 and can be available threaded or threadless. Other common size is 1" and mostly use for road or non-offroad intended bikes. The steerer tube is where the stem is inserted over and bolts tighten it in place.
      90mm is the length of the stem, measure from the middle of the steerer tube hole to the middle of the bar clamp hole, because the clamping sizes may vary. The length is measure by total flat distance and not by horizontal distance because of angled stems.
      6 rise is the rise in degrees of the stem. More common is 6, but stem without rise are also called squared, flats or 90 angled.
      25.4mm is the diameter of the handlebar that can be clamp on the stem. The 2 sizes are 25.4mm or 31.8mm. MTB mainly use 31.8mm, as it is stronger, but both are used all across the bike industry.


    Forum language :

    • IMO : In My Opinion
    • IMHO : In My Honest Opinion
    • TY : Thank you
    • Rep : Reputation
    • Repin' : To add or deduct reputation, mainly used when adding reputation more then deducting it.
    • Neg rep : Negative reputation
    • Pos rep : Positive reputation
    • Rep Power : The amount of reputations points you can give or deduct to/from a member each times.
    • Reputation points : For each 100's reputation points, you get a green square, plus one more point of rep power. If your reputation goes under zero points, then you have a red square.
    • IDK : I don't know
    • IDC : I don't care
    • OP : Original poster, used in a thread discussion to refer to the author of the thread instead of naming it.
    • OT : Off topic, when the thread's discussion is not directly related to the original topic of the thread.
    • AFAIK : As Far As I Know.
    • YMMV : Your Mileage May Vary.
    • BS or bs : B u l l s h i t.
    • OTB : Over the bars, usually referring to a crash situation while riding.
    • PITA : Pain In The A s s
    • CL : Might refer to CraigList, free online classified website.
    • FTW : For The Win.
    • ATW : All The Way.



    Edit : Now I will also add a quick fact list... And new stuff for the upper list will be listed under the edit in the list. Forum slang will also be separated. New definitions and info add by members posting them will be added here when possible.

    Quick facts :

    • SRAM and Shimano shifter and derailleur are mainly not compatible together.
    • Do not remove factory lube from a new chain, just wipe off excess with a rag when getting dirty.
    • The left side pedal's threads (non-drive side) are reverse threads.
    • 1/2" pedals threads are mainly for BMX use. 9/16" threads are more common for MTB and road use.
    • You cannot fit a wheel that is bigger or smaller then the frame was designed for is using v-brake or canti, as the brake post will not match the rim. Use disc brake, coast-lock, drum brake or no brake.
    • Brake cable housing is bigger then shifter cable housing. same for cables.
    • Do not touch disc brake's rotor with bare hands or any oily/greasy surface to not contaminate them.
    • Read the instructions. Before you mess up.
    • Use the proper seat post diameter ton ensure good fit and prevent damage and injury.
    • Seat post should be inserted at least to the minimum insertion length and better if long enough to go past the seat tube - top tube junction of the frame to ensure maximum strength and prevent frame fatigue.
    • Put a protector on the chainstay of your bike to prevent the chain from damaging it. A simple inner tube can be wrapped around with zip ties.
    • A chain tensioner or chain guide is a must for any aggressive trail riding or DH/FR.
    • You can use a FSA crank with a Shimano chain and a SRAM cassette, it doesn't matter as long as everything is designed for the same setup, such as 7 speed, 8 speed, etc.
    • Do not use grease to lube the cables and housing... teflon based lube is the best and good quality housing and cable are often pre-lubed.
    • Learn how to change a flat before going out on the trails. And bring a pump with the spare tube.
    • Tire often have rotation directions, so be careful when installing them.
    • 26" inner tube can stretch to accomodate a 29" rim in worst scenario case.
    • Use the right tools for the job. Bike and hammer rarely work well together.
    • When installing a new fork, be sure to remove the crown race from the old one to put it on the new one, otherwise your headset will not be complete and serious injuries can result.
    • Take it to a pro before it get worst. And expensive.
    • You can leave your bike dirty, but your drive train should never be. Cleaner bike = less problem on trail and longer life of components.
    • A bike is made to resist force coming from front to rear, not from side to side, so consider this when carrying it on car or trailer.
    • When installing a seat post, gently lube the seat tube with light grease, such as lithium or white grease to prevent scratch and grinding. Do not use grease on carbon seat post, unless specify.
    • Zip ties are always useful, so carry some along when you go for a ride.



    So there's might be plenty more, but that's all I get for now.

    Hope you enjoy and happy reading through the Mountain Bike Review Forum

    David
    Thanks for this terrific glossary, I'm working my way through it. There's another mtb term I heard a bit ago which I don't know what it means, "huck to flat". I don't know if that's the kind of thing that would go in your glossary, but what DOES it mean? I think it's something to do with suspension, does it straight up mean bottoming out your suspension travel? "Huck" (throw) your bike "to" the "flat" (bottom) of it's suspension travel.

  71. #371
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobBracket View Post
    Thanks for this terrific glossary, I'm working my way through it. There's another mtb term I heard a bit ago which I don't know what it means, "huck to flat". I don't know if that's the kind of thing that would go in your glossary, but what DOES it mean? I think it's something to do with suspension, does it straight up mean bottoming out your suspension travel? "Huck" (throw) your bike "to" the "flat" (bottom) of it's suspension travel.
    "Flat" refers to a flat landing. It is harder on your suspension than landing on a downhill slope as more of the energy is focused straight downwards.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  72. #372
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    "Flat" refers to a flat landing. It is harder on your suspension than landing on a downhill slope as more of the energy is focused straight downwards.
    And landing on a downslope is called a. . . . wait for it. . . . wait for it. . . transition.

    And also huck to flat is not only hard on the suspension but adds fatigue to the frame. Bottoming out the suspension sends the energy forced into the frame. Doing this on a regular basis will eventually crack the frame.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  73. #373
    Out spokin'
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    Has this already been mentioned? Confess I didn't read all 4 pages.

    Mountain bikers use terms that come from the sport of Observed Trials. I didn't see these in the OP.

    Dab = to put a foot down while riding.
    Clean* = to ride through a section of trail without dabbing.

    *Many if not most riders say "clear" when they mean "clean." If you clear a section of trail, you're doing trail maintenance. If you ride a section of trail without dabbing, you clean it. May sound backwards, but regardless, that's the dealio.
    =sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  74. #374
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    And landing on a downslope is called a. . . . wait for it. . . . wait for it. . . transition.

    And also huck to flat is not only hard on the suspension but adds fatigue to the frame. Bottoming out the suspension sends the energy forced into the frame. Doing this on a regular basis will eventually crack the frame.
    not to mention, it's hard on your body. same conclusion applies - you might crack YOUR frame.

  75. #375
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    not to mention, it's hard on your body. same conclusion applies - you might crack YOUR frame.
    Ya, i just discovered Fat/mountain biking 3 years ago, i was 58.
    I read many times that you should hit the bottom regularly
    but if i did i would adjust my suspension.
    Well in the sixties we learned common sense.
    Play smart, brake your toy = your loss.
    I do not have shit called smart.
    Smart is in me.

  76. #376
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    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    Ya, i just discovered Fat/mountain biking 3 years ago, i was 58.
    I read many times that you should hit the bottom regularly
    but if i did i would adjust my suspension.
    Well in the sixties we learned common sense.
    Play smart, brake your toy = your loss.
    I do not have shit called smart.
    Smart is in me.
    what? complete sentences and coherent thoughts would help a lot here.

    you SHOULD bottom out your suspension occasionally. but there's a huge difference between a soft bottom-out that uses EXACTLY all of your travel and does not require more travel or excessively firm settings to achieve because you're grossly under-biked, and the sort of hard bottom out that you get from a big huck-to-flat with a hard landing. The goal is to set your suspension so you use EXACTLY all of the travel from time to time on the roughest trail you ride with reasonable settings that still allow for good sensitivity for smaller bumps. Part of this involves purchasing a bike that suits the way you ride well. It's silly to purchase an enduro bike if all you're riding is gravel and smooth hardpack trail. Nobody's stopping you from doing that, but you need to face the fact that the bike is not ideally suited for the riding you're doing.

    If big huck-to-flat riding is what you love and what you do, then you need the bike for it, and you need suspension settings that can handle it. Chances are, that bike is going to suck for doing a lot of other sorts of riding. Ah, I remember the short period of time when pictures of massive hucks-to-flat filled mtb rags.

  77. #377
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    Quote Originally Posted by 33red View Post
    Ya, i just discovered Fat/mountain biking 3 years ago, i was 58.
    I read many times that you should hit the bottom regularly
    but if i did i would adjust my suspension.
    Well in the sixties we learned common sense.
    Play smart, brake your toy = your loss.
    I do not have shit called smart.
    Smart is in me.
    Lol brilliant post! I need to give you a reputation point for that.

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