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  1. #1
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    Looking for bike for heavy rider.

    Hi, I'm a big guy (~250lbs) and I was wondering what kind of bikes the more knowledgeable people would suggest for me to look for. I'm mainly going to use it for commuting but might try some easy trails sometime.

    I'm hoping for something that's pretty cheap, really just a beginner's bike. 200-300 dollars maybe?

  2. #2
    Forging Elite Awesomeness
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    Take a look at the Specialized hardrock.

  3. #3
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    I was gonna suggest the Specialized Hardrock too. Wait, I just did....LOL
    If you can swing it, get the disc model. Its a bit more.....but worth it IMO.

    If you get the HR, ask the bike shop if they can get a stiffer spring for the front fork. Will make it better for your weight.
    I have a hardrock and the bikes are bullet proof, and will last a longtime.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  4. #4
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    You could also try the Trek 4300 disc model or the 4500 disc model and have the shop add a stiffer spring to the front fork.

    I have owned 2 trek 4300's and for commuting and light path riding and light off roading they work great.

    Pretty cheap too, plus if you crack the frame trek will replace it for the lifetime of owning the bike (if you buy it new of course)

    For you reference, I am 6 ft tall and weigh 285 lbs without gear and I am hard on bikes.

    Check out the clydesdale threads too for some help.

    If you got the cash, a bomb proof frame is the kona hoss. The components aren't too clyde worthy, but the frame is a beast.

  5. #5
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    When searching for the Hardrock online I've found there's an XC, XC Sport, Comp, Pro and a Sport, what's the difference? Also, how should I choose the wheel size? By my height?(5'11")

  6. #6
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    Sport minumum. Or a comp, whatever you can afford. You want 26" wheel size, but don't confuse that with the frame size. You prolly want a large 19", but go to the local shop and try out different sizes before you decide which bike you buy. Ride them all. I don't know what the XC and XC sport are, but I know mine is a sport and will take disc brakes.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  7. #7
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    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=32576

    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=32573

    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=32575

    Yea, I would steer away from the HRXC. If you can afford it get the Comp Disc, the second one I listed. If you can sport even more get the Pro Disc. Shop around at local shops and see if they can cut a deal. Most shops will give you at least 10% off the tag, some more, some less.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  8. #8
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    Ah, ok, now that size thing makes sense, thanks.

  9. #9
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    Well, on a site I was looking at the HRXC and Hardrock XC are listed as different models. There's also a Hardrock XC Disc listed on there.

    Is the HRXC that much worse? I really don't know what to be looking at here to judge quality.

  10. #10
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    I think the HRXC is a lighter frame, possibly not as bullet proof as the Hardrock Sport, Comp or Pro. I would stick to the regular Hardrock line as I have no experience with any of the HRXC frames.

    The Hardrock Sport is a great bike, unless you need disc brakes, get the Comp Disc....which I recomend highly. Disc brakes are something you might end up wanting not so far down the road.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  11. #11
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    I am 6'4'' 297# and my Giant Rincon has held up very well on hard trails. Other than my current chain suck issues.

    I recently ordered a Forge SawBack and will soon know how it will hold up under my big @$$

  12. #12
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    Love my Haro Escape Comp...when I got it I was pushing 260 now I'm down to 215. I have the stiffer spring in the fork, RS even sent it out for free and my LBS installed it. Have had it since last July and have had zero problems with it other than breaking the u-turn fork adjuster knob. It weighs about 32 lbs so its not light but seems to be plenty strong. Mine is stock minus the fork spring and the wacky stem I'm using.


  13. #13
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    I'm a bit bigger than you at a little over 300#, and I find that cheap suspension forks are not good for heavy riders. A full rigid bike would be more reliable and possibly cheaper. The Redline Monocog with either 29" or 26" wheels would be a good bet, they go for around 400 bucks.

    http://www.redlinebicycles.com/adult...ocog-29er.html

    It is a single speed, but I would rather not have a bunch of low end drive train components that will be a constant headache.

  14. #14
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExZeRoEx
    Hi, I'm a big guy (~250lbs)
    ...
    I'm mainly going to use it for commuting but might try some easy trails sometime.
    You are not all that heavy and mountain bikes are designed to take a beating on rough ground. Looks like the use will pretty light. I think just about any decently built bike will survive.

    You need a bike that is a good size for you: not too long or too short. I do not think you will need a suspension fork. If you get one, make sure it can be adjusted for your weight.

  15. #15
    Bionic Mtn Biker
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    Agree with the Hardrock Comp Disc. Disc Brakes = better stopping power for bigger guys. The Haro Escape Series is also worth looking into, as they're designed for Clydes. One of my buddies rides one, and he weighs 220#. You can find good prices on last year's models. And yes, be sure to find out if you can get a stiffer spring for the fork, because I can guarantee that when you cruise the easy trails, you will want to try more challenging stuff.
    Better than he was before. Better. . . Stronger. . . Faster. (but not smarter)

  16. #16
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    When I first saw mention of single speed bikes while browsing here I was kind of confused. What is the advantage of having a single speed? It seems like being able to change gears for hills and such would be pretty important. Are the single speed bikes more for flatter ground?

  17. #17
    local trails rider
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    I ride a singlespeed (SS) hard tail, and a geared bike with a lot of suspension travel at both ends.

    People have different reasons to SS:
    - fewer things to buy, adjust or break (I have bent a derailer hanger or two on trails)
    - more simplicity in gear
    - more simplicity in riding (after you forget about shifting...)
    - a different challenge
    - I am old (young?) enough to remember how much fun a simple bike could be in the neighborhood woods.

    When going up a hill on a SS you do it pretty differently, compared to "geared": on a 27 gear bike you tend to winch yourself up the hill slowly in a low gear; SS, you start with as much speed (momentum) as you can and see if it is enough. SS you get out of the saddle when pedaling gets harder. Otherwise you are not going anywhere and your knees will suffer.

    When I converted my bike to SS, I found it surprising what you can climb SS when you put some effort into it. It is just a different way of doing it. Maybe takes a different attitude too.

    SS limits your top speed but going slowly on SS is hard, so you want to keep up the speed even in the tricky spots of trail. It does not allow you to be lazy.

  18. #18
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    Sounds fun, maybe if I really get into biking in the future I'll consider one too.

    Also, is the Iron Horse Warrior 3.0 a decent strength bike/frame? This is something I've been looking at.

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