Kona Cinder Cone- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Kona Cinder Cone

    Hello all

    I was wondering if you guys could give me some advice. I'm looking to get a bike that can handle the terrain anywhere I want to take it. I probably won't be looking to get too much air with it but when I go for a proper ride I'll probably be trying to negate tricky downhill sections and probably long haul trails.

    A friend is selling the 05' model of the Kona Cinder Cone for 300 (19 inch frame). Is this a decent bike? Will it serve its purpose? I've had a quick look around the net and the reviews seem to be extremely positive. However, I'm a very light guy (about 8 and a half stone) and I noticed that a few people saw its main con as it was too heavy! Should I be looking for something substantially lighter?

    Anyway, I've put a couple of pictures up so you guys can tell me what you think.

    Cheers bros








  2. #2
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    Good bike but you can probably get a new Kona blast (better suspension do to the year ect) for close to the same price, when looking into last year models.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blurr
    Good bike but you can probably get a new Kona blast (better suspension do to the year ect) for close to the same price, when looking into last year models.
    Do you mean new but a couple of seasons old? (I'm a skier at heart and always get old seasons stuff coz it's usually 30 - 50% cheaper)

    Also, do you think it would be worth getting something that's a bit lighter? Formally I'm a beginner to the sport, but I do get a lot of kicks out of riding my BMX so I'm no stranger to bike control, and also I have a nous for every adrenaline sport I've ever tried so I expect I'm going to be a fast learner and constantly pushing my boundaries. I'm going to want something I can haul about whilst I'm riding to get decent positions and stuff. Having said that I have the frame of a climber so a good strength to weight ratio but compared to some people i'm a weakling.

    Sorry if this is gibberish! I can picture in my head the type of riding I'll be doing but I dunno if I'm using the terminology of a biker. If you know skiing... compare what I want to do to both technical off-piste, rapid downhill and cross country.

  4. #4
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    Sure last years or two year old models are common right now at least in America do to the recesion, I picked up my blast last year for under 500USD and it was regularly priced at 750.00 at that time.
    One thing told to me, when I bought mine, was most people do not buy a much of a bike as they need, now for me my Hardtail serves my riding style with an occasional crazy rocky trail asking for a FS, but by no means necessary. I ride some fairly aggressive trails for where I live (not extreme mind you) and get on just fine, somewhat rocky, small drops ect.
    I wouldnt worry so much about the weight at this point, I do think people get carried away (ready for the flames) and you will be happy with any quality name brand HT.
    hope that helped.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blurr
    Sure last years or two year old models are common right now at least in America do to the recesion, I picked up my blast last year for under 500USD and it was regularly priced at 750.00 at that time.
    One thing told to me, when I bought mine, was most people do not buy a much of a bike as they need, now for me my Hardtail serves my riding style with an occasional crazy rocky trail asking for a FS, but by no means necessary. I ride some fairly aggressive trails for where I live (not extreme mind you) and get on just fine, somewhat rocky, small drops ect.
    I wouldnt worry so much about the weight at this point, I do think people get carried away (ready for the flames) and you will be happy with any quality name brand HT.
    hope that helped.
    Yeah thanks mate. I'll check about see if I can find a blast for around the same price. If not i'll probably go with the cindercone as the price is right and its from a guy I know so very convenient.

  6. #6
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    There is nothing wrong with that bike as a do-everything hardtail. Only comment would be to agree with Blurr... 2005 is rather an old model, you can probably find a newer bike for about the same money. I can't speak to the market where you live but the price seems a bit high for a 6 year old bike that has obviously been used. But if you know the seller and the price is right, no reason not to buy it.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by InlawBiker
    There is nothing wrong with that bike as a do-everything hardtail. Only comment would be to agree with Blurr... 2005 is rather an old model, you can probably find a newer bike for about the same money. I can't speak to the market where you live but the price seems a bit high for a 6 year old bike that has obviously been used. But if you know the seller and the price is right, no reason not to buy it.
    He says he's not had much use out of it and it's been sitting in his garage. Is it because you would expect a 6 year old bike to have a lot of wear? or is it because the technology will be different and i could do better for the same price?

  8. #8
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    Technically it would be fine. I have been riding a 1998 Rockhopper for the last year, it's still fun as hell. The price just seems a bit high for a 2005, but like I said I don't know your market.

    That amount here would be about $450, I would expect to find a ~2007 or so equivalent bike with disc brakes for that much where I live.

    I can also see rust in the bottom bracket, it will need servicing and it probably needs a new chain.

  9. #9
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    That is not a 2005 model. It's not a 2004, a 2003, or even a 2002. . . . Nope, it's a 2001 model:

    http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...a&Model=Cinder Cone&Type=bike

    IMHO, that is a high price for a 10 year old bike that sold for $750 USD.

    It does look to possibly have the original tires on it (or maybe he replaced them with the same tires it came with) so it is possibly a low mileage bike although it does look a tad crusty around the bottom bracket area. Most everything else looks to be original as well which leads me to believe it may very well have somewhat low hours/miles of actual use.

    The frame does have disc tabs (as does the fork), but the hubs are not disc compatible, so a disc brake upgrade would get costly. The fork is entry level and may not work well until it gets serviced and even then it will not be anything more than something that may take the edge off sharp bumps.

    For me, that is over twice the amount I would pay for such a bike. I wouldn't be upset with your friend for asking that much (people that paid for bikes new have a hard time believing how much their bike is actually worth), but he should know the actual model year. For some reason, bikes are never newer than people say they are. They always end up being older

    Looks like it could use some cleaning and lubrication, in addition to making sure everything works well so you don't hurt yourself on it or break down out on the trail.

    We had a guy come out to ride with us a couple years ago whose v-brakes weren't adjusted properly and the pad slipped over the edge of the rim and fammed into his spokes on a steep downhill. Hello broken collarbone!

    If you could get it for no more than $200 USD, it may be a good enough bike to get you riding, but ONLY if it fits you well enough.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj
    That is not a 2005 model. It's not a 2004, a 2003, or even a 2002. . . . Nope, it's a 2001 model:

    http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...a&Model=Cinder Cone&Type=bike

    IMHO, that is a high price for a 10 year old bike that sold for $750 USD.

    It does look to possibly have the original tires on it (or maybe he replaced them with the same tires it came with) so it is possibly a low mileage bike although it does look a tad crusty around the bottom bracket area. Most everything else looks to be original as well which leads me to believe it may very well have somewhat low hours/miles of actual use.

    The frame does have disc tabs (as does the fork), but the hubs are not disc compatible, so a disc brake upgrade would get costly. The fork is entry level and may not work well until it gets serviced and even then it will not be anything more than something that may take the edge off sharp bumps.

    For me, that is over twice the amount I would pay for such a bike. I wouldn't be upset with your friend for asking that much (people that paid for bikes new have a hard time believing how much their bike is actually worth), but he should know the actual model year. For some reason, bikes are never newer than people say they are. They always end up being older

    Looks like it could use some cleaning and lubrication, in addition to making sure everything works well so you don't hurt yourself on it or break down out on the trail.

    We had a guy come out to ride with us a couple years ago whose v-brakes weren't adjusted properly and the pad slipped over the edge of the rim and fammed into his spokes on a steep downhill. Hello broken collarbone!

    If you could get it for no more than $200 USD, it may be a good enough bike to get you riding, but ONLY if it fits you well enough.
    This is seeming less and less like a good idea!

    I'm afraid I get nothing coming up when i click that link but I will take your word for it.

    I'm also thinking a 19" frame is going to be too big for me and I'd probably need an 18 or smaller. I was also hoping to ultimately upgrade the brakes. I'm a student so 300 quid (460 USD) is going to jeopardise my lifestyle and chances at getting a second week in the french alps this winter (sorry guys- skiing is my love).

    He has held off putting it on eBay for me so I could try it out when I next see him. I may just tell him not to bother and wait on a new bike until I find something better value for my money. Our winter has been horrible so I probably won't get decent use out of it until summer anyway.

    When are new bike models released? I'm asking because I assume that's when you're most likely to get old seasons gear and I'd rather buy this stuff new from someone experienced who can give me genuine face-to-face advice. I assume it'll be around now like the ski stuff...?

    This is going to be a horribly generic question... But what would be a good bike? Is there anything people have experience with and is a good entry level bike that would allow me to progress but not break the bank?

    Thanks again guys, this has been most helpful.
    XCheese

  11. #11
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    I'll second--that Cinder Cone is definitely prior to 2004. By 2004, Cinder Cone's had disk brakes. For such an old bike, I think the price is high.

    I have a 2004 Kona Blast, which is one step down from the Cinder Cone (it had v-brakes), but probably better than the 2001 Cinder Cone. To be honest, I don't think I could get more than $100 for it. I'd do some research as to what bikes of that vintage go for, let your buddy put it on ebay and bid what I think it's worth. Or, if he can't get his minimum on ebay, give him an offer after he hasn't sold it.

    I liked the frame. Over the years, I upgraded the wheelset and the fork. These upgrades lightened the bike and made it feel more efficient. I didn't go for disk brakes. I have no problem with v-brakes on this bike. If you ride aggressively, or on aggressive trails, you will probably want disk brakes. Eventually, I did upgrade the frame to a steel frame, but that was icing on the cake. The real performance differences were in the wheel and fork upgrades.

    Also, if the frame is the wrong size, DON'T GET IT. I'm 5-8" and an 18" frame worked well for me. I am usually a medium, 17", or 18", but have never taken a 19" frame.

  12. #12
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    Try this link:

    http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/Default.aspx

    Then click on "2001", click on "Kona", and then click on "Cinder Cone"

    Now, you should be seeing a pic of the same bike the OP has shown.

    BikePedia will also have links to all years a particular model was produced. The Cinder Cone has been made for many years. Click on any of them to see the different offerings over the years.

    Be patient OP, I think you can do better and let your friend get what he can on the open market.

  13. #13
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    Dont worry about weight, it's not that big of a deal. I have a 33lb KHS AM1000, complete overkill for Michigan and I still ride XC with it. The Kona Cinder Cone is a great entry level model and would serve a good purpose for you. Kona is a good brand and you can always upgrade at a later date if you get into some sketchier stuff.

  14. #14
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    last years models are out now, as are year behind those as well, most companies are not moving inventory like they were so manufacturing has to slow ect, just call a bike shop and be specific that you would like a leftover or even a test bicycle, both will get you a significant savings. btw skimping on a mtn bike is like skimping on everything else, so make sure you get the right bike for you. If you pick up an older one for cheap, it is usable of course, but both the guys I ride with had older bikes, one got a new bike competely, the other still rides an old gary fisher tequila with new forks, the new forks made it a new bike he said.
    have fun.

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