Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    156

    just few pics from my lunch time spot

    like the title, just a few pictures from my lunch time riding spot. really helps on some high stress days to get rid of the anxiety.

    realizing now too i would prob be best suited on a more AM oriented bike. afraid im gonna tear my xc to pieces
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Sir Hurt Locker
    Reputation: 2_Tires's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,007
    Nice little spot you got there. From what I see in the pictures, you don't need an all mountain bike.
    Cheers,

    Seb

    __________________________________________________
    Live Free and RIDE Hard!!!!
    Defiant MTB

  3. #3
    TimB
    Reputation: Runfox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    71
    I got a queation,,,, I hear AM, all mountain bike and XC, cross country bike, so what exactly is the dirrerence?? AM has longer suspension travel?? I'm trying to visulize the difference. I would think you could ride a XC on moderate mountain trails, right?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    156
    yeah my XC is fine for these pics, but just mainly ride here for cardio and to get out of our lab for a while. ha ha not real sure why i added that comment about the AM bike, didnt really fit the post i guess.
    my local trails are more hills and few bridge gaps and some dh jumps. but getting more adapted to riding mountain bikes, ive gotten more comfortable and now spotting jumps i would like to make more and more.

    I am no expert by any means, but from research i have done the AM bikes have more travel, and frames more suitable for taking hits/jumps, and the frames also have a geometry more suited for aggressive mix of riding.

  5. #5
    Hoosier
    Reputation: Keatan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    442
    You can ride an XC on any trails you want. The whole difference thing is hype and comfort. Trails and AM bikes will have a more upright position and more suspension. You can do anything on an XC bike you could do on either of those, it just may not be as comfortable.
    SS is like beer...its an acquired taste.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    156
    and the lighter xc will break into pieces

  7. #7
    The Martian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,200
    Quote Originally Posted by jdr6031
    and the lighter xc will break into pieces
    Um, no, not unless you are hucking it off 3+ foot drops routinely or really can't pick a line and have epic crashes all the time.

    If you were comparing an XC bike to a DH bike (and related lift assisted riding) I'd agree, but the new "trail" and light all mountain bike category frames themselves (and even most of the components) aren't that much more burly but do provide a different riding position to those that have no interest in the aggressive race geo. They don't even necessarily provide more travel anymore.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ray Lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,290
    Wow, hope the down hill guys dont see this or they will feel stupid for hauling around the extra 20 pounds

    I dont know how or why with mountain bikes its "not cool" to be specific but I know for a fact my 215 pound self could snap my buddies sub 20 pound race bike riding like I do.

    It would have really helped me (and my LBS's) if I had known these "labels" before I started looking for a mountain bike, would save tons of time being able to narrow my search to bikes that are designed to do what I am after.

    I guess I am old school, I think there is a right tool for the job.... never really liked the spork approach always end up wishing I had a fork or a spoon instead.

    Ray

    Quote Originally Posted by Keatan
    You can ride an XC on any trails you want. The whole difference thing is hype and comfort. Trails and AM bikes will have a more upright position and more suspension. You can do anything on an XC bike you could do on either of those, it just may not be as comfortable.

  9. #9
    The Martian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,200
    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Lee
    Wow, hope the down hill guys dont see this or they will feel stupid for hauling around the extra 20 pounds

    I dont know how or why with mountain bikes its "not cool" to be specific but I know for a fact my 215 pound self could snap my buddies sub 20 pound race bike riding like I do.

    It would have really helped me (and my LBS's) if I had known these "labels" before I started looking for a mountain bike, would save tons of time being able to narrow my search to bikes that are designed to do what I am after.

    I guess I am old school, I think there is a right tool for the job.... never really liked the spork approach always end up wishing I had a fork or a spoon instead.

    Ray
    I'd say it's more that there is definitely a few wrong tools for the job rather than one or two "right" tools.

    Downhill was not mentioned, rather trail and all mountain. While there are bikes billing themselves as "all mountain" that actually are a fair bit burlier than an XC race bike there are also some that aren't. I'd also bet that there are quite a few downhill runs (void of large drops) that a *good* rider on an XC bike could do (but not win a race against DH bikes down). Obviously its going to be a completely different ride on the XC bike (work the brakes, pick your lines, etc) than the DH bike (speed, eat up the trail/obstacles, etc) but the frame/components aren't going to be like "O the horror, I'm not supposed to be on this trail *catastrophic fail*"

    So by that token it's more how you ride than what trail you ride.

    Bike builds are so blurred now there's more a continuum than categories. (more extremes that would be wrong for the job than single defined units that would be right). For example take the Ibis Mojo, is it an XC race bike, an all mountain bike, a trail bike? It's used for all. On the less boutique side you have things like the Trek EX series. Certainly they can handle some "all mountain" riding (probably not lift assisted downhill under the average rider and they won't win a downhill race), but people race them and do well, and then there's the people that just ride them all day. So, is it a trail bike, a light all mountain bike, or an XC race bike?

    My Yeti ASR is built as a purely XC racer. I don't race, and I don't flinch to take it down any trail I come across (but I'm not an extremely aggressive rider and I'm not going to come across a downhill race course anytime soon either); point being it was the best "trail bike" fit for me even though it says "XC race" in the advertising. I'm willing to bet my frame won't explode spontaneously if I happen to catch 1 foot of air or run it through some technical section while pointed in a downhill direction.

  10. #10
    TimB
    Reputation: Runfox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    71
    OK so while we are talking bike types, categories, XC cross country, AM all mountain and such, let me ask this. Let me tell you where I have been riding and you all tell me what type of bike that best fits. I ride a local trail once a week or so, some say its easy to moderate Technical, some tight turns, lots of roots, moderate ups and downs of say 1-2 feet. Then we go to a bike park occasionally , Santos near Ocala, that has yellow easy trails, blue harder trails, and some red , very hard Technical trails. Even has a BMX jump track.The yellow are too easy, I can handle most of the blue, and want to work up to some of the red, and some of the smaller jumps. Red being over rocks, up down 3- 4 feet elevation changes, really hard stuff. SO what type of riding is that? All mountain or cross country??

  11. #11
    Hoosier
    Reputation: Keatan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    442
    That would just be your average trail riding that either bike could handle. So maybe with an "XC" race bike there are some parts that can't handle bigger guys and bigger drops. But not everyone's XC bike is sub-20 lbs and built by a weight weenie. I guess my original point is more that a hardtail, not always XC, can handle anything an AM bike can. It just might not be as comfortable.
    SS is like beer...its an acquired taste.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    315
    Wow, I just read through this thread for the first time and somehow this thread got off track. To the OP, nice lunch time trails! I wish I could ride on my lunch break, but all I have around the office is an urban jungle. I'll just leave early and find some dirt.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JSumner13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,576
    It must be nice to have a spot like that to blow off some steam during your lunch break

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    156
    yeah, don know where this thread went off to?

    thanx guys, on the riding spot comments.

    but, on the other comments, i have a hardtail xc bike that i know for a fact would crunch in half if doing the jumping i would like to do. no way around it. was just saying would have gone the DS route, but the HT got me started in this awesome sport so it was fully worth it and does a dang good job on its intended trails!

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.