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  1. #1
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    I've been bitten!

    It's true. The bug bit me and is sucking me dry. I'm on my bike every day. Yesterday I was out riding old fire trails, four wheeler trails, logging trails from about 2 in the afternoon until 9 that night. Even rode down the road to a little homestyle restaurant and got a ham sandwich. Found a hydration pack on chainlove that I went ahead and purchased. Was given a frame pump, multi-tool, head/tail lights, saddle bag and more. All I need now is a better helmet and I'm all set for anything and everything nature can throw at me!

    Only problem is, I'm STILL trying to get everything fine tuned. When riding, there is a "clickety clickety clickety clickety" from my rear derailleur and shifting isnt' very smooth. seems to JUMP from one chainring to the other. I've tried adjusting the tension and loosening the tension via barrel adjusters, but it still makes that clicky sound when pedaling and JUMPS when I shift gears, tho all gears work. When trying to adjust barrel adjusters, the clicking doesn't stop, but I either end up missing gears, or skipping gears. I don't get it. I have it adjusted so all gears work, but still clicks and jumps. Brakes still squeal extremely loudly and I can't get them to stop. I might just have to take it to the LBS and have them adjust it all this weekend. Very disappointing.

  2. #2
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    Too bad you didn't buy a bike from a shop.

    How much money did the BD bike save you now that you need tires that aren't trash and will probably have to pay a shop to get your BD bike working properly?
    :wq

  3. #3
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    I've no regrets about my purchase. The tires will be used, whether I replace them now and swap them back when I do my 5 day trip end of summer, or go ahead and ride them until I wear them out. There's no loss from the tires because either way, they will get used. As for the adjustments, the LBS will only charge $15. I think I can spare 15 bucks for a proper adjustment. So even still, BD saved me some money. Even if I DO get another set of tires, I still saved. The LBS had 3 or 4 bikes to choose from. 2 mountain bikes HT (only one that was put together), one FS and another that was $7,000. And a few road bikes that I wasn't even interested in. Cheapest one was $475. It was ugly, had crappy tires, v-brakes. Didn't impress me.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by nachomc
    Too bad you didn't buy a bike from a shop.

    How much money did the BD bike save you now that you need tires that aren't trash and will probably have to pay a shop to get your BD bike working properly?
    Dude, climb off the guy's back.

    Gemini9, the offer still stands if you want to bring the bike over to my place. If you want, I can go over simple adjustments with you as well.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Dude, climb off the guy's back.
    You got more butt hurt than he did, and he has already satisfactorily answered the question.
    :wq

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Dude, climb off the guy's back.
    He has a point. A bike shop would have had the bike running properly in the first place and would stand behind their sale and kept it running properly.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  7. #7
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    Not all bike shops are owned by honorable people, so it's a fallacy to make a blanket statement like that. He could just as easily have been sold an overpriced lemon from a LBS and then had them blow him off when it came to adjusting for cable stretch and what-not. Who cares anyway?

    Congrats on the new bike! Post a pic!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bclagge
    Not all bike shops are owned by honorable people, so it's a fallacy to make a blanket statement like that. He could just as easily have been sold an overpriced lemon from a LBS and then had them blow him off when it came to adjusting for cable stretch and what-not. Who cares anyway?

    Congrats on the new bike! Post a pic!
    That's like saying that you should avoid all people because some people are killers. Any bike shop can fix a bike satisfactorily (of course some are better than others) but it doesn't matter where you buy a bike online, you don't get any help with it. It's fine if you know what you're doing, but this isn't one of those cases now is it?
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  9. #9
    DynoDon
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    I'll say it again, Zinn & the art of Mountain Bike Maintenance,, there is alot of info in there from adjusting, to emergency maintenance, fitting, gear development, trouble shooting, you'll get an overview of your bike that will help you in many ways, for $15 how can you go wrong.
    It'll keep you busy when its raining too.. LOL!!! good luck

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Dude, climb off the guy's back.

    Gemini9, the offer still stands if you want to bring the bike over to my place. If you want, I can go over simple adjustments with you as well.
    OP, take this guy up on his offer....wrenching skills are priceless.
    Consequences dictate our course of action and it doesn't matter what's right. It's only wrong if you get caught.

  11. #11
    Braille Riding Instructor
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    ^^^^ What he said. ^^^^

    Never turn down a tune-up and learning session from a good wrench, no matter how rabidly anti-kickstand/saddlebag he might be.

    Seriously, though, if you go, don't forget to bring him a cold one or two. Most wrenches I know are happy to work for beer.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by gemini9
    Only problem is, I'm STILL trying to get everything fine tuned. When riding, there is a "clickety clickety clickety clickety" from my rear derailleur and shifting isnt' very smooth. seems to JUMP from one chainring to the other. I've tried adjusting the tension and loosening the tension via barrel adjusters, but it still makes that clicky sound when pedaling and JUMPS when I shift gears, tho all gears work. When trying to adjust barrel adjusters, the clicking doesn't stop, but I either end up missing gears, or skipping gears. I don't get it. I have it adjusted so all gears work, but still clicks and jumps. Brakes still squeal extremely loudly and I can't get them to stop. I might just have to take it to the LBS and have them adjust it all this weekend. Very disappointing.
    Try This:

    Rear Derailleur Adjustment:

    1) Shift the bike to the smallest cog (9th gear if it's a nine speed setup). Turn the cable adjuster on the shifter for the rear derailleur (right end of the handlebar) all the way in and then back it all one full turn. If you're using a Shimano derailleur with a cable adjuster where the cable enters the rear derailleur, do the same thing with that adjuster that you did with the one on the shifter.

    2) Loosen the cable nut on the rear derailleur and gently use a pair of pliers to pull the cable fairly snug (but no need to pull it super tight), and tighten the nut a little over half way tight (tight enough that it won't move when you shift while adjusting, but no so tight it will disfigure the cable in case you have to make an adjustment before you're finished).

    3) Shift the bike to 2nd gear and look at it from the rear of the bike. Use the cable adjuster (on the rear of the derailleur if it's a Shimano or at the shifter if using SRAM) to adjust the top pulley on the derailleur so it is lined up exactly with the 2nd to largest cog on the cassette. You use the adjuster on the rear derailleur for this step if using Shimano so that you save as much room at the shifter as possible for subsequent on-the-fly adjustments.

    4) On the rear derailleur, shift to the largest cog and look at the derailleur from behind. Use the limit screw on the side of the derailleur to adjust the derailleur so the top pulley wheel lines up exactly with the large cog when looking at it from behind. Shift down to the smallest cog and do the same using the other adjustment screw on the back of the derailleur.

    5) Again shift to 2nd gear and check the pulley alignment and then shift to the 8th cog and make sure it lines up well there too. Make any fine adjustments you can see are necessary.

    6) You are ready to test ride the bike. If it is not shifting smoothly, shift it to 2nd gear and look at it from behind. Hold up the rear of the bike and turn the pedal (it's easier if you have help doing this). You can also turn the bike upside down, but shift it first to 2nd gear so you don't have to do this with the handlebars on the ground. Watch the way the chain acts as you turn the pedals. If it jumps up toward the largest cog, turn the adjuster inward (tighten) one 'click' at a time until it stops jumping. If it is looking like it is trying to shift to a smaller cog, turn the adjuster as though to loosen it (this will in effect increase the cable length) until it stops trying to shift downward. Retest the bike by riding it. Repeat this step until it shifts perfectly.

  13. #13
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    Unfortunately shifting feel won't ever be very good with low end components. It will work but you'll never get rid of that jump feeling.

  14. #14
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    Sorry, how about a useful suggest:

    Your derailleur hanger is bent, get it adjusted.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  15. #15
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    I find park tools blue book of bicycle repair better than zen's for quick reference. I feel that it you are having some hate from the fanboys of LBS. I agree there 'adjustment services" sound nice let me give you a small story. I bought a Gary fisher intro level MTB from a LBS for about 400$ and was thrilled about the servicing. Well first couple rides adjustment issues start coming up and I take it in for tune-up. It was slow so they did it right there and i took the bike home thinking it would work fine. WRONG. and these shop gys are good this was years ago and I have gotten to know the shop guys very well and they know there stuff. I didnt know that at the time and took it back for a re-adjust and the shop guy gave me this funny look and did it again, this time showing me how. this is when since they know my family, they proceded to tell me how I need to learn to wrench myself cause the cheaper bikes even ones under a thousand can take daily adjustments for perfect shifting of no sounds coming from bike. Lower end components will give you hajor issues with adjusting first things I upgraded on the bike was a rear der. and and the shifters, what a world of difference that made. Point is i never made use of the shop after that as i found i could adjust the cheaper stuff just as good as they could. if im gonna spend a like 2,3 or 4 thousand dollars on a bike id go to a LBS but under a thousand it really doesnt matter cause there is only so much they can do in a shop. Also shops are businesses who dont ride the bike. so they notice less little ticks and creaks and will in general put less into a low end quick repair job than there own bikes of a fun bike to work on. Its just the way it is so the simple solution is buy buy buy lots of tools and just figure it out on your own, I am more than willing to give advice in detail if needed but just ranting rq before work.

  16. #16
    Dirty nerotic bike whore
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    o and that brake issue, if your running v-brakes try koolstops!!!

  17. #17
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    Don't worry about what the guy said about paying extra now that you want to make some changes on your Bikes Direct bike. If you spent $500 a bike store, you would have paid about $35 in sales tax...which is what it cost to tune your bike at the LBS and get new tires, so you are good to go.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratmonkey
    Unfortunately shifting feel won't ever be very good with low end components. It will work but you'll never get rid of that jump feeling.
    +1 on this

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Dude, climb off the guy's back.

    Gemini9, the offer still stands if you want to bring the bike over to my place. If you want, I can go over simple adjustments with you as well.
    Sounds like a plan. I'm pretty tied up this weekend, as I've got 3 shows to do and after that, I need to get my car fixed. My rotor sounds like it's about to fall off lol but it should be a quick fix. Pretty bad, my bike is more reliable than my car. But definitely, once my car is fixed, I could use some tips. Would be helpful. I'd hate to have to take it to the shop to do it, because I won't learn anything that way. I'm going to have to learn how to do all this myself.

    Trouble with my mind here, where did you say you lived? lol

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum
    Sorry, how about a useful suggest:

    Your derailleur hanger is bent, get it adjusted.
    Hmmm. Well it's a brand new bike, but I guess it's possible. .... I wonder..... How can you tell if it's bent? I haven't really abused it any. Haven't layed it on the ground, I always lean it against a post or a tree. I hope it's not bend. That an easy fix? I'll throw a fit if I have to replace it lol.

    Oh, and thanks for the suggestions everyone. Eventually I'll get all this figured out and someday maybe I can help someone else who is having the same problems. But then again, it might just be that it's an entry level bike and has cheap parts.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by gemini9
    Hmmm. Well it's a brand new bike, but I guess it's possible. .... I wonder..... How can you tell if it's bent? I haven't really abused it any. Haven't layed it on the ground, I always lean it against a post or a tree. I hope it's not bend. That an easy fix? I'll throw a fit if I have to replace it lol.

    Oh, and thanks for the suggestions everyone. Eventually I'll get all this figured out and someday maybe I can help someone else who is having the same problems. But then again, it might just be that it's an entry level bike and has cheap parts.
    It is shockingly easy to bend a hanger without knowing; kick up a rock or stick, casually lean something against your bike, lean your bike against something, put your bike in the car funny, or just get your bike with a bent hanger... there's dozens of ways to get your shifting out of alignment. I once unboxed my brand new bike and the hanger was so badly bent I put a brand new hanger on it.

    If you know what you're looking for it's relatively easy to identify if your hanger might be bent; stand behind the bike with the bike in the middle chainring and a middle cog and stand behind the bike. If you notice that the derallieur pulley isn't in the same line as the cogs then your hanger is bent. A bike shop has a really handy gauge to check and fix hanger alignment but you'll have to check by eye. If it even looks like it might be out of line then it's worth taking it somewhere to have it looked at. a very small misalignment can lead to big shifting issues.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  22. #22
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    re: RD clicking.

    a few things come to mind when I encounter a RD not working and I inspect them in the following order:

    1. hanger/ alignment. if your RD has taken any bumps or hits, it could easily get bent. they are rather fragile, especially the lower-end models. if the hanger on the frame is bent, it might not be detectable. even if you can tell that it's bent, you need a special tool to bend it back to parallel to the rim, or you can just replace it (assuming your frame as a replaceable RD hanger). there are dozens (hundreds?) of RD hangers out there, so check www.derailleurhanger.com to find yours if you need it. in fact, buy one now so that when you really wreck a hanger, you have a spare lying around ready to go.
    2. limit screws. this has already been discussed. if your outbound limit screw is not set right, everything will be off.
    3. cable tension. see #2.
    4. chain/ mech damage. is the chain stretched? is the cassette old and worn out? is the cage twisted or bent in any way?

  23. #23
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    I'll probably just take a trip out to badmechanics place. Said he'd offer a few pointers. Good drive from here so I'll have to get my car fixed first. Which reminds me, I need to call the garage and see when they can get me in.

  24. #24
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    Ok lemme see here. The barrel adjuster for the rear deraileur, it's on the handle bars. If I unscrew it really far, it seems to shift a little better, but I can't back it out any farther without it completely coming out. So my question is, by backing out that barrel adjuster, is that loosening or tightening the tension on the rear derailleur?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by gemini9
    Ok lemme see here. The barrel adjuster for the rear deraileur, it's on the handle bars. If I unscrew it really far, it seems to shift a little better, but I can't back it out any farther without it completely coming out. So my question is, by backing out that barrel adjuster, is that loosening or tightening the tension on the rear derailleur?
    That is tightening the tension. Screw the barrel adjuster most of the way back in and reset the cable tension using the pinch bolt on the der.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  26. #26
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    "Sometimes I doubt your commitment to Sparkle Motion."

    How exactly does one suck a #*%@?

    lol Had to say it. Anyway, I'll screw in the barrel adjust and tighten the tension on the RD and see what happens.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by gemini9
    "Sometimes I doubt your commitment to Sparkle Motion."

    How exactly does one suck a #*%@?

    lol Had to say it. Anyway, I'll screw in the barrel adjust and tighten the tension on the RD and see what happens.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  28. #28
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    A little off topic, have you seen the Donnie Darko continuance? "S. Darko"? I thought it was kinda lame.

  29. #29
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    I wish I had your kind of time. I try to do 1 night after work and the weekends but even that is tough. No way I'm riding in the dark and between work and kids not a lot of daylight left.
    He who dares....wins!

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by gemini9
    A little off topic, have you seen the Donnie Darko continuance? "S. Darko"? I thought it was kinda lame.
    You know, I haven't seen it and it's because I was worried it would be stupid. I'll get around to it someday though.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  31. #31
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    Well I'm laid off. Unemployed. I've got all the time in the world to ride around. Cept on weekends when I'm doing a show, but other than that, I'm free as can be. You're not missing much. S Darko was a disappointment.

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