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  1. #1
    Formerly mtbnoobadam
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    Its Finally Here!!

    This has been the longest week of my life waiting for this thing to be delivered. But its finally here and I couldn't be happier, you couldn't smack the smile off my face right now. I can't wait to take her out and get her dirty.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Its Finally Here!!-bike5.jpg  

    Its Finally Here!!-bike6.jpg  

    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbles
    That depends. Can you go fvck yourself?

  2. #2
    Still New
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    Alright! Looks like you're all set and good to go! I know the feeling. I just got my new ride and took it out today. Totally awesome. Congrats with your new bike! Hey, that water bottle land pump ooks awfully familar... lemme guess. Walmart?

  3. #3
    Formerly mtbnoobadam
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    ... and if we just ...

    Took it out for a couple hours this evening and WOW what a difference from my other gt. And yep you caught me those are definately from wally world. I've had them for a couple years and they work fine for me, the bottle holds water and pump pumps air...good enough in my book
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbles
    That depends. Can you go fvck yourself?

  4. #4
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    Looks real good. I'm always impressed when I see GT bikes. Good value for alot of bike. Enjoy.
    When the **** did we get ice cream?

  5. #5
    Afric Pepperbird
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    Nice bike!

    You may want a Camelbak or Osprey hydration pack for that pump, however. They are much, much better than a saddle bag. Plus, they carry your water for you!

  6. #6
    Braille Riding Instructor
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirt farmer
    You may want a Camelbak or Osprey hydration pack for that pump, however. They are much, much better than a saddle bag. Plus, they carry your water for you!
    Saddle bags have their merit. If you have multiple hydration packs (like I do), remembering to transfer essentials before rides can be a minor hassle. But if you keep those essentials (spare tube, patch kit, multi-tool, and tire levers) in your saddle bag, you never have to worry about what is--or isn't--in your pack.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbnoobadam
    Took it out for a couple hours this evening and WOW what a difference from my other gt. And yep you caught me those are definately from wally world. I've had them for a couple years and they work fine for me, the bottle holds water and pump pumps air...good enough in my book
    What GT model is it, how much $$, & what is the weight?

    I checked out the GT Outpost 2.0 at Performance store ($299 on clearance!!), & liked the frame

  8. #8
    Cantankerous Old Fart
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirt farmer
    Nice bike!

    You may want a Camelbak or Osprey hydration pack for that pump, however. They are much, much better than a saddle bag. Plus, they carry your water for you!

    I have a saddle bag on every bike in the stable. (3)

    In each are the bike specific items such as a tube (there are 2 sizes to deal with) as well as never leave home W/O it items such as patch kit, tire levers, CO2 cartride, etc..

    On short ride of 12 miles or less I just put a water bottle in the cage & go.

    I only burden myself W/the hydration pack W/all of the "possible" for rides of longer duration.

  9. #9
    Formerly mtbnoobadam
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirt farmer
    Nice bike!

    You may want a Camelbak or Osprey hydration pack for that pump, however. They are much, much better than a saddle bag. Plus, they carry your water for you!
    I have a camelback, I just use the waterbottle as a backup for when the camelback goes dry. The saddle bag contains my tools, patch kit, spare links etc. It's easier to keep all that stuff in there since I use the camelback for other activities and the biking stuff comes out.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbles
    That depends. Can you go fvck yourself?

  10. #10
    Formerly mtbnoobadam
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    Quote Originally Posted by chimpanzee00
    What GT model is it, how much $$, & what is the weight?

    I checked out the GT Outpost 2.0 at Performance store ($299 on clearance!!), & liked the frame
    My other bike is a 2009 gt aggressor. I got it off craigslist for $100. It weighs 29 lbs. The new one is a 2010 gt avalanche 1.0 disk. I got it off eBay for $450. It weighed 28 lbs with the bottle, pump and loaded saddle bag. I'm not sure what it weighs without that stuff. I've never really cared about weight that much. I don't race or anything so a couple pounds doesn't matter much to me.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbles
    That depends. Can you go fvck yourself?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdparrish
    Saddle bags have their merit. If you have multiple hydration packs (like I do), remembering to transfer essentials before rides can be a minor hassle. But if you keep those essentials (spare tube, patch kit, multi-tool, and tire levers) in your saddle bag, you never have to worry about what is--or isn't--in your pack.
    Yeah until you lose your bag on the trail. Which I have heard of millions of riders doing, even in my local forum.

  12. #12
    Afric Pepperbird
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    Quote Originally Posted by XCSKIBUM
    I have a saddle bag on every bike in the stable. (3)

    In each are the bike specific items such as a tube (there are 2 sizes to deal with) as well as never leave home W/O it items such as patch kit, tire levers, CO2 cartride, etc..

    On short ride of 12 miles or less I just put a water bottle in the cage & go.

    I only burden myself W/the hydration pack W/all of the "possible" for rides of longer duration.
    Fair enough. I guess since I live out west, where every ride is a sweat-soaked, mountainous epic, I always carry a bladder and bag.

    Bottles can be cool, too.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfox90
    Yeah until you lose your bag on the trail. Which I have heard of millions of riders doing, even in my local forum.
    I've heard of many MTBers having terrible crashes, but I'm not gonig to not ride simply because of what I've heard.

    On that note, I'm not sure how one loses a properly installed and maintained saddle bag. Pretty spurious argument, if you ask me.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdparrish
    Saddle bags have their merit. If you have multiple hydration packs (like I do), remembering to transfer essentials before rides can be a minor hassle. But if you keep those essentials (spare tube, patch kit, multi-tool, and tire levers) in your saddle bag, you never have to worry about what is--or isn't--in your pack.
    I have multiple bikes, so transferring a seat bag between them would be annoying. A good solution is to put all your bike stuff in a light nylon sack, and then you can just transfer the sack between hydration packs.

    Quote Originally Posted by hdparrish
    On that note, I'm not sure how one loses a properly installed and maintained saddle bag. Pretty spurious argument, if you ask me.
    It can definitely happen. Once the velcro gets a little old, or gets mud or dirt on it, and if the pack is heavy, it can swing around enough on a rough downhill to eventually detach. However, for me the annoyance of having something swinging around back there is worse. They're like a scrotum for your seat.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    I have multiple bikes, so transferring a seat bag between them would be annoying.
    Then a saddle bag might not be a good solution for you. Doesn't mean it won't be for someone else, however.

    As with most other options in this sport, there isn't a "one size fits all" remedy. The key is to understand that and not propagandize your preference simply because you want someone else to do as you do. And I am using "you" in the general sense here ... I think.
    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    It can definitely happen. Once the velcro gets a little old, or gets mud or dirt on it, and if the pack is heavy, it can swing around enough on a rough downhill to eventually detach.
    LoL. Yes, I'm sure it can happen. Just about anything can happen. I don't think it's very likely to happen, however, especially if it's a well-made saddle bag and it's properly maintained. Just like any other component or accessory, a saddle bag could fail if it's overloaded, unclean, and not properly fastened. But blame the bag!
    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    However, for me the annoyance of having something swinging around back there is worse. They're like a scrotum for your seat.
    Swinging around back there? I always thought your handle was merely a joke, but if you can't or don't know how to properly fasten a saddle bag, then maybe you were being serious.

  16. #16
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    My Camelbak won't fail if it's overloaded and unclean (I never mentioned not properly fastened). Also, the only seat bag I ever used which didn't move around was held in place by a hard plastic clip. All the velcro ones I've seen and used have movement to them.

    I'm not saying a seat bag should never be used. However, in my experience, there is usually a better option than a seat bag.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    (I never mentioned not properly fastened).
    True, but you did mention "swinging around enough" and "swinging around back there," which imply either poor attachment design by the manufacturer or poor installation by the user.
    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Also, the only seat bag I ever used which didn't move around was held in place by a hard plastic clip.
    I have one. It's made by Deuter. The front is held in place by a velcro strap around the seatpost, and the rear has a plastic clip that snaps in to the back of the saddle. It doesn't swing, shift or even rattle.

    It's not currently on my bike, however, because I've taken up the habit of lowering my seat for certain descents and the strap and the rear LED take up too much room on the seatpost, if that makes any sense. But I'd remount it in a heartbeat if I were going on an extended day trip or a biking/backpacking expedition.
    My Camelbak won't fail if it's overloaded and unclean
    EDIT: Also wanted to address this.

    OK, so maybe your Camelbak won't fail, but there are other components or accessories that will, right? It's not like it takes a great deal of time, knowledge or effort to dust off or tighten a saddle bag from time to time.

    If a user neglects a fork, their brakes or some other part and they fail, you'd blame the user, right? But if that neglect is extended toward a saddle bag, you blame the bag? Doesn't seem very consistent.

  18. #18
    Formerly mtbnoobadam
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    The bag I have on there doesn't move or rattle at all since the straps go all the way around it and hug the bag tightly to the bottom of the seat. And Anyways how did this thread get changed to an argument about saddle bags anyway? It was supposed to be so you guys could tell me how cool my new bike is lol
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbles
    That depends. Can you go fvck yourself?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by hdparrish
    LoL. Yes, I'm sure it can happen. Just about anything can happen. I don't think it's very likely to happen, however, especially if it's a well-made saddle bag and it's properly maintained. Just like any other component or accessory, a saddle bag could fail if it's overloaded, unclean, and not properly fastened. But blame the bag!
    It happens ALL the time, I'll have whatever your smokin' if you think saddle bags don't fall off frequently. I didn't say saddle bags aren't nice or warranted, I'm saying that when I go into my local Lost and Found forum section, it consists of saddle bag found with: wallet, keys, phone. Along with 30 people saying they lost theirs.
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  20. #20
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    Wow did this thread even get derailed by something as mundane as a stupid saddlebag.

    Congratulations on your new purchase. I've built and test ridden many an Outpost (the store I work at is a dealer) and would say that they are a solid offering from GT.

    From one GT owner to another (I own a Peace) many happy trails and enjoy the new ride.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
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    Looks like a nice bike, enjoy!

  22. #22
    Braille Riding Instructor
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfox90
    It happens ALL the time, I'll have whatever your smokin' if you think saddle bags don't fall off frequently. I didn't say saddle bags aren't nice or warranted, I'm saying that when I go into my local Lost and Found forum section, it consists of saddle bag found with: wallet, keys, phone. Along with 30 people saying they lost theirs.
    Instead of requesting what I'm smoking, perhaps you should bum a toke off the ****ing morons who can't properly attach a saddlebag to a bike.

    If you applied the same sort of lowest common denominator argument to all of biking, you'd never have the audacity to throw your leg over a top tube.

  23. #23
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    I just appreciate how rabidly dedicated you are to seat bags.

  24. #24
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    It's got far less to do with seatbags than with the misinformation that you and others have spewed in order to sway readers to your viewpoint.

  25. #25
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    What misinformation? I've spoken from personal experience.

  26. #26
    Nature-loving Humanist
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    Wow....so much silliness in this thread. As a new member of the site and having recently obtained a GREAT bike as well (with help from some ofthe awesome folk in this very thread!), congrats on your new bike! I'll post pics of mine in a bit.

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