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  1. #1
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    intro with lots of question

    good day to all im new in biking just got a trek 4300 with 22.5 frame using it for a month on-road and offroad now i clock in the odo meter around 700kilometer already. Im a bit over weight im 130Kg/286lbs 6'4". But every week i need to bring to the dealer for tuning i always mess up the derelium and i hate the sound it makes every shift can any one suggest what type of gear set i can use to improve my ride.

    By the way im a filipino staying in bangkok, thailand.

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the site. Its a derailleur, not a derelium but I know what you meant. What do you mean by you always mess it up? There is not a lot of improvement available for that bike unless you want to replace more than 1 part. Let me explain if you went to a better cassette which would be more than likely jumping into a 9 speed you would also need a new derailleur and shifter for 9 speed, and by then you would have spent possibly over 100 dollars on just some basic items, especially if you get them installed at a bike shop. My suggestion if you cant get the derailleur to work right bring it into the shop, if they cant fix it bring it to a better shop or have them replace the derailleur it should still be under warranty and should be free.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  3. #3
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    oooppps the derailleur, i mean by "im messing it up" every time i use it off-road i have to bring it to the dealer to have it tuned again and still it shift rough and some times it will take atleast 10 to 15 second before it shift leaving me shock when it shift. Just yesterday they tune in again ang they change the rotor under the cassette because i broke it already. If i change i will do it the whole gear set im thinking slx or xt, but will it improved my bike ride or will i have the same problem over and over again,


    Thank's.

  4. #4
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    What exact part did they change? When you describe they changed the rotor under the cassette.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  5. #5
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    it was a round thing with spline and some bearings i really dont know how it was called but they remove the cassette and it was inside it, im sorry im a real beginner in all aspect.

    They keep on telling not to chnage any thing but rather but a better bike just save the money but i dont want another bike i just want to make this one work for me.

  6. #6
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    Few things. I'd keep the bike too. Just ride the crap out of it until you decide that off-road riding is for you. Then upgrade to a better bike.
    They probably replaced the freewheel or possibly your bottom braket. Either way, if you blew up one of these already...damn.
    If you want to upgrade your drive train you can do an overhaul the the rear for about $100. New shifters and an lx rear derailleur and have them installed at the LBS. Get SRAM Attack shifters and an LX rear derailleur from Jenson and have the Lbs install them.
    However, if they did replace your freehub (the part that makes your rear wheel spin when you pedal - under the gears) then that might have been your issue. Just remember that if you are going to keep destroying parts on this bike I'd think twice before dumping good money into it for the hell of it.

  7. #7
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    Yes that is what they change my freewheel, did ride again today around 40K the rear dereilleur still making funny sound and change some time's around 10 to 15 second then after 20K im hearing a clicking sound some where in the pedals, is this because of a crappy parts or im just to heavy and im doing an improper shifting.

    Im in thailand bro the cost of Deore XT gear set is around 15K baht that is around 400USD im willing to change the whole gear set as long as it will improve my bike ride.

  8. #8
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    Learning to shift propperly, and learning to adjust your own deraileurs, will help you out more than any upgrade you can make. Just search these forums, and you will find many threads on these subjects.

  9. #9
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    Thanks i been reading and im learning a lot really starting to love biking im a little excited to ride my bike every day im loosing weight and having fun.

    also thank you so much Vtolds, im still thingking what to do hehehehehehe

  10. #10
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    Is your chain crossing because that will make noises
    Last edited by clutch_08; 10-31-2009 at 08:12 AM.

  11. #11
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    the noise is clicking i some where in the rear and pedal.......................

  12. #12
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    watch the online videos a few times about tuning/setting up your derailleurs. should be easy to learn if there isn't a language barrier.

  13. #13
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    A lot of beginners use bad technique when shifting and think it is the kit.

    Shifting is a skill that must be learnt.

    Work out where the shifting pins line up so when to weight/unweight.

    The two most common mistakes by beginners are:

    1: cadence is too low
    2: putting power in when shifting

    1: It is important to keep your cadence around 90 rpm. This will give a lot of benefits of smoother power and better traction/balance climbing. It will also make the gears shift faster.

    2: when shifting put NO POWER in at all, none. use your legs to rotate the pedals, but offer no force to add forward power to the bike. The simple way to check this is, can you shift going downhill, but not on flats or up?

    You can eventually learn to shift going up hill, by accelerating fast enough that you can free-wheel for a second, but that's a hard skill.

  14. #14
    R.I.P. DogFriend
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPark
    Learning to shift propperly, and learning to adjust your own deraileurs, will help you out more than any upgrade you can make. Just search these forums, and you will find many threads on these subjects.
    Quote Originally Posted by CaveGiant
    A lot of beginners use bad technique when shifting and think it is the kit.

    Shifting is a skill that must be learnt.

    Work out where the shifting pins line up so when to weight/unweight.

    The two most common mistakes by beginners are:

    1: cadence is too low
    2: putting power in when shifting

    1: It is important to keep your cadence around 90 rpm. This will give a lot of benefits of smoother power and better traction/balance climbing. It will also make the gears shift faster.

    2: when shifting put NO POWER in at all, none. use your legs to rotate the pedals, but offer no force to add forward power to the bike. The simple way to check this is, can you shift going downhill, but not on flats or up?

    You can eventually learn to shift going up hill, by accelerating fast enough that you can free-wheel for a second, but that's a hard skill.
    Nice explanation Cavey!

    Dadz, read that until you understand it or keep asking questions until you can get this technique down.

    You really should learn to adjust your own rear derailleur (front too for that matter). Put the bike in 2nd gear (any gear other than the very top one or very bottom one will work for this). Look at the cassette (rear gear cluster) and see if the top jockey wheel on the derailleur is precisely vertically lined up with the gear on the cassette. If it's slightly off it will pull the chain toward the next gear one way or another and will either make noise or skip/click. With Shimano rear derailleurs, they have a cable adjuster on the derailleur as well as on the shifter. Screw the adjuster outward (counterclockwise) to move the derailleur toward the wheel and clockwise to move it away from the wheel. If your chain is lubed, and your derailleur ajusted well, it should run pretty quietly.

  15. #15
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    will do and follow your advice guys i will be riding again this afternoon will try to feel shifting the right way hehehehehe and do it proper thanks i will be back again for more question also before riding i will be cleaning my bike and try to learn to adjust my dereilleur

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