I'm Patching 5 Punctures After Every Ride- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    I'm Patching 5 Punctures After Every Ride

    I'm just a casual rider who does it for enjoyment not to be some sort of super stud, but after every single ride I am having to patch atleast 5 punctures in my tube. This is really starting to take the enjoyment out of riding. The culprit is thorns that come in from the outside of my tire and puncture down through the tube. Currently I'm running tubes that are slimed so I am not getting flats on the trail rather the next day without fail my tires are flat. Is there something glaringly obvious that I am missing? (Yes I am scraping the inside of my tire prior to patching and reinserting the tube) I really like riding but this is a major inconvenience. Should I be looking at the $80 per tire upgrade to tubeless? Thanks

  2. #2
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    Do you pull the thorns as soon as you see them, or do you leave them in the tire?
    Salsa Timberjack SS
    -Gears give me headaches

  3. #3
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    I leave them in the tire. I haven't got any flats on the trail only the next day.

  4. #4
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    Try pulling them out. After you pull it, continue riding. As long as the hole is less than 1/8", the slime will seal it. It's also a good idea to have a mini pump with you in case your tire gets too soft. If that doesn't do the trick, see if your LBS can get heavy duty tube with sealant OR consider the switch to tubeless.
    Salsa Timberjack SS
    -Gears give me headaches

  5. #5
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    Just run STOP Flats2 tire liners. Not sure if you're familiar with them or not but they are basically a tough plastic liner that goes between your tube and the tire.

    I've done over 2000 miles with no flats since I started using them. I had to change my rear tire recently and was shocked to find about 20 thorns that had gone into the tire but hadn't penetrated the tire liner. These things are worth every gram of weight they add (weight weenies will try to talk you out of it I'm sure) and the meager $20 price tag.

  6. #6
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    No liners!! They never work if you are dealing with things like goat head thorns. If you have tubeless compatible rims, get some thick ust tubeless tires, and get a quart of Stan's no flats sealant. If your rims aren't ust tubeless, do a search for ghetto tubeless. I've been running it that way for years with absolutely no problems. As long as you replace/refill the sealant every few months you won't have any more trouble.
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  7. #7
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    Goat head thorns are exactly what's puncturing my tires.

  8. #8
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    I've pulled out goat heads, cholla cactus, glass pieces and my tire liners stopped them just fine.

    In fact I've had such good luck I now pretty much just ride over everything without much thought to if it will give me a flat or not.

    Tubeless will never give you that kind of confidence.

    I'm not talking the slime liners garbage either, or even Mr. Tuffy. Have to get the STOP brand with the double layers and the beveled ends.

  9. #9
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    I live in Goathead thorn country. I'd get flats from them at least a few times a year. I switched over to tubeless with Stan's inside this past Winter and I've never had a thorn related flat since. In fact, I had forgotten all about flats until I recently rode with a buddy who still rides tubes. He got thorn related flat that day.

    Switch over to tubeless and say bye-bye to thorn related flats!

  10. #10
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    I have a similar problem. I was thinking of cutting an old inner tube down the middle and using it as some sort of budget armour on the inside of the tire.

  11. #11
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    When I ride in El Paso on my HT I run Slime in my tubes & tire liners. On my FS I run UST tires with 30% Slime & 70% Stan's.

  12. #12
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    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  13. #13
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    I've used tire liners for years in my BMX days and they've stopped me from getting flats from staples, small nails, thorns, glass and who knows what else. They're money well spent!

  14. #14
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    Me thinks we need this tire

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  15. #15
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    Slime in tubes is ineffective for the long term, the thin rubber of the tubes don't allow the puncture to seal fully and, as you've seen, it will get you out of the woods most of the time but it won't save your tube. That costs a lot of money if you're puncturing every single ride out.

    Tire liners are very hit or miss; the best ones work great but often weigh a ton or are a huge pain to install especially if you have a tight rim/tire combo. They also weigh a lot, probably as much as a slimed tube.

    Tubeless (in any form: UST, ghetto, etc) weighs less than a slimed tube and also gives you the benefits of better rolling, better traction, and the ability to run lower pressures along with the sealant properties. The ghetto method is easy to set up if you have access to an air compressor and if you're running one of the good sealants like Stan's then you won't have any more trouble with punctures from goat heads. Just pull them out when you're done and do a quick ride on the tires to let the sealant into the holes the goat heads made. The difference with Stan's sealant (and similar) is that it has suspended particles with a latex base so the particles clog up the hole and the latex dries in place. The downside is that depending on climate you will have to refill the sealant every couple months.
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