I'm Nervous (first bike purchase)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    I'm Nervous (first bike purchase)

    Well... I went to my LBS last night with a friend, and he we talked to the owner, I assume, he seamed very knowledgeable had a good idea of the area and what trails we were riding. My buddy ended up ordering a new 3700 (or maybe a 3500) Trek Hardtail.

    What I'm nervous about is, as I was looking at the other bikes I saw what turned out to be a Trek 6000 Hardtail. The owner said it was used, it looks to be in GREAT condition (minus a little rust on the screw thingy on top the fork). He also said the guy that had it had 6-7 bikes and didn't need this one anymore, it has an upgraded fork and sprockets (or something like that and sorry, I can't remember the brands offhand, but he said they were high quality components). From the paining on the frame it's either a 2008 Trek 6000 or a 2009. The ONLY problem I have with the bike is every where I've looked it shows the 08's and 09's with mechanical rotors. The one in the store has the clever(?) brakes. While this isn't a real big deal to me, again I'm just nervous. I'm going to assume if the bike came with rotors and the guy switched them out, that would involve changing the whole brake system (which again isn't a big deal).

    I guess I'm just looking for some feedback on if I should take the plunge or grab a newer one. The price that is listed on the bike is $300 (and I already put down $100 but I'm sure I can transfer it to a different bike if necessary). I didn't have much time to ride it, but I plan on riding it a little before I buy it.

    A little about me:
    I'm 22, male, 185 (consistent for the past few years) and about 6'0. I haven't ridden in about 10 years (consistently). I'm going to be doing a lot of trail riding and possibly riding to work (5 miles). I'm not to concerned about riding to work part. I want to get into free riding sooner or later.

    Sorry for the wall of text! Tell me what you think!

  2. #2
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    Could you define a bit better what you mean by "clever brakes"? Are they still disc brakes? If so, then I would guess that the original owner put on hydraulic brakes. Many would consider that an upgrade. It would help to know the brand/model of the current brakes.

    What is the current fork on the bike? You said it is "upgraded". It wouldn't hurt to confirm that. Give a call back to the shop and ask them what's currently on the bike.

    BTW, the bike came with a Dart fork. It would not surprise me at all to learn that the owner had switched to something nicer.

    Assuming the bike is in good shape, you'll get a lighter bike and better components in the 6000 than in a new, 3500. Hard to tell much without actually seeing the bike though.

  3. #3
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    Dryfter,

    Either way, if what you listed is true I think it's a good deal if the bike fits you. Have you test ridden it yet? The 6000 originally came with mechanical disc brakes if it's an '08 or '09, so the switch back to discs for that bike should be relatively easy. I'd ask the LBS if the rims that are currently on the bike are disc compatible. If so, you could get some Avid BB7's for less than $100 and still be WAY ahead of the game.

    That 6000 won't do you any good for freeride, but for trails and a commuter, you'll be fine. The military police here ride 6000's with a tire perfect for that purpose.

    In my opinion go for it. (If it fits!) Have the owner size you up on the bike and take it for a spin. It sounds like your gut is telling you to go for it, just take a quick pause and make sure it fits before you leap.
    I'm beginning to overcome my "momentum issues" but even that is happening slowly.

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick
    Could you define a bit better what you mean by "clever brakes"? Are they still disc brakes? If so, then I would guess that the original owner put on hydraulic brakes. Many would consider that an upgrade. It would help to know the brand/model of the current brakes.

    What is the current fork on the bike? You said it is "upgraded". It wouldn't hurt to confirm that. Give a call back to the shop and ask them what's currently on the bike.

    BTW, the bike came with a Dart fork. It would not surprise me at all to learn that the owner had switched to something nicer.

    Assuming the bike is in good shape, you'll get a lighter bike and better components in the 6000 than in a new, 3500. Hard to tell much without actually seeing the bike though.
    No, they are not disk brakes. I can't remember off hand, but if I saw/heard the name I would probably recognize it.

    Quote Originally Posted by JCullen
    Dryfter,

    Either way, if what you listed is true I think it's a good deal if the bike fits you. Have you test ridden it yet? I haven't test ridden it yet, but I definitely will today after work. The 6000 originally came with mechanical disc brakes if it's an '08 or '09, so the switch back to discs for that bike should be relatively easy. I'd ask the LBS if the rims that are currently on the bike are disc compatible. If so, you could get some Avid BB7's for less than $100 and still be WAY ahead of the game. I will ask them!

    That 6000 won't do you any good for freeride, I'm guessing I'll need full suspension for that? but for trails and a commuter, you'll be fine. The military police here ride 6000's with a tire perfect for that purpose.

    In my opinion go for it. (If it fits!) Have the owner size you up on the bike and take it for a spin. It sounds like your gut is telling you to go for it, just take a quick pause and make sure it fits before you leap. Yup, planned on doing all that today! If I end up getting it I'll take some pictures (and figure out what the "upgraded" parts are) after I get back from the ride.

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    I think what I'm trying to get out is the brakes don't grab rotors. they grab the rim it self.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dryfter
    I think what I'm trying to get out is the brakes don't grab rotors. they grab the rim it self.
    Interesting. At first glance, looking at the photo that you linked to in your OP, it did not look like that frame even had v-brake studs.

    BTW, the issue for freeride is to me one or burliness. If you are seriously going to get in to freeriding and large drops and that sort of thing, then you need a bike that is built to handle the abuse. I suppose most would want full-suspension, but the real issue is having a bike and/or suspension strong enough to handle the hits.

    Since this is your first purchase, just go with a good, cross-country bike. See where that gets you. Ride it for a season or two. See how you progress.

  7. #7
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    V-brakes

    Quote Originally Posted by Dryfter
    I think what I'm trying to get out is the brakes don't grab rotors. they grab the rim it self.

    Don't worry about the brakes. If they're set up properly, they'll stop you.

    As the others have said, the bike is a good deal if it fits you. If it doesn't, it's not the right bike for you.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick
    Interesting. At first glance, looking at the photo that you linked to in your OP, it did not look like that frame even had v-brake studs. Yup, that was just the frame that looked most like mine on the trek website.

    BTW, the issue for freeride is to me one or burliness. If you are seriously going to get in to freeriding and large drops and that sort of thing, then you need a bike that is built to handle the abuse. I suppose most would want full-suspension, but the real issue is having a bike and/or suspension strong enough to handle the hits.For right now, I don't plan on doing any "drops" over 2/3 feet. Just hit a trail with some good "bumps" to get a little air. He did say (if I remember correctly) the tires on the bike are "dual" or "double" walled.

    Since this is your first purchase, just go with a good, cross-country bike. See where that gets you. Ride it for a season or two. See how you progress. Yup, I figured i would start out a little slow and try not to kill myself. haha
    If you think any of that will effect the bike in a bad way please say so, I'd hate to come back to your guys later tonight with a bike in 2/3 pieces. Or even me

  9. #9
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    It's fine...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dryfter
    If you think any of that will effect the bike in a bad way please say so, I'd hate to come back to your guys later tonight with a bike in 2/3 pieces. Or even me

    The bike will handle 2-3' drops if your technique is proper.

    Have fun.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  10. #10
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    One more question...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dryfter
    If you think any of that will effect the bike in a bad way please say so, I'd hate to come back to your guys later tonight with a bike in 2/3 pieces. Or even me

    What size is the bike?
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  11. #11
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    Like Ken said if the bike has properly installed brakes don't worry. They will stop you with ease. If the bike fits it is a steal at that price.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC
    What size is the bike?
    As in the sizing mechanism Trek uses? Again, and I hate to say it, I can't remember exactly but it's either a 17.5 or a 19.5. I'm leaning more towards the 19.5 because I know that's where Trek's chart said I should be looking, so those are mainly the Bikes/sizes I was looking at.

    meaning I was only looking for bikes in the 19/21 range.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod
    Like Ken said if the bike has properly installed brakes don't worry. They will stop you with ease. If the bike fits it is a steal at that price.
    Yeah, that's what I was thinking. I hope it fits me, and I fit it!

  14. #14
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    I think that bike looks likes a very nice first bike for you.

    The fork appeared to be the weak link. Looks like that has been upgraded, so you should be even better off there.

    The drivetrain components appear to be quality units, and that's one of the most important things.

    Assuming you feel comfortable riding the bike, there's certainly no good reason not to pick it up.

    After taking a 10 year layoff (and you are only 22, so that means you haven't ridden much since you were 12...), then you really don't need the worlds greatest bike right now. You need a bike, which you can improve your skills on.

    This bike fits that description perfectly.

  15. #15
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    I think by "clever" breaks, he means Cantilever Breaks . . .


  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattchuck2
    I think by "clever" breaks, he means Cantilever Breaks . . .

    Yes, I think you're right about what he's trying to describe except I bet it actually has V-brakes not cantilever.

    If it does have cantilever instead of V-brakes...then it isn't an 08 or 09. It's much older. Can the OP describe the color of the frame?

    If it is an 08 or 09 Trek 6000....for $300, I'll take it without second thought. They're lightweight XC bikes that usually goes for near $1k.

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    Did it look like any of the below?




  18. #18
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    Or did it look like this?



  19. #19
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    Well, sorry I haven't posted in a while. I'll give you a run down of whats gone on in the past week.

    I also figured out EXACTLY what my bike is. 2003 Trek 6500 it has the better of the two sets of shocks from that year.

    Tuesday (4/20): Ended up buying the bike. Little issue when I rode it the front gears wouldn't shift, they tore them down and greased everything, after that they worked great. Took it to our local trail, and the bike did WONDERFUL. UNTIL..... I broke the chain. Don't ask, I'm not really sure how I managed it, but a link snapped.

    Wednesday (4/21): Got a new link for the chain, worked great.

    Thursday (4/22): Went with my buddy to pick up his bike, then went back out to our local trail. Got to about the same spot as last time and his handle bars had come loose. We didn't have the right tools to fix it (have since gotten the correct tools) and figured it wasn't a good idea to continue so we decided to turn in for the day.

    Monday (4/26): My buddy got his bike fixed, did some light trails in town.

    Tuesday (4/27): Went back to the trail we'd done TWICE before and only gotten about 3.8 miles into. And yup, you guessed it, my chain messed up again. Now it skips between gears when I put pressure on the pedals. We figured out one of the links in the chain was stiff, so we popped that one off and replaced it. Still wouldn't shift right, so we took that chain off and popped on the spare I bought from the LBS. STILL won't stay in the correct gear.

    Wednesday (4/28): Got lazy and said screw it, I'm playing some video games today.

    Thursday (4/29): Today me and my brother are going to take a look at it. He's thinking the new chain is to long. I'm thinking he's right because the rear shifter thingy isn't in the right place. I'll post some pictures when I get my phone hooked up to my computer.

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