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  1. #1
    escapee
    Reputation: friendzonehero's Avatar
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    i'm 6'2" and ride a 24" frame...

    ...which i came to find out is recommended for riders 6'4" to 6'6" -- is this bad?

    (it's a giant yukon)

    the man at the bike store who fitted me for it said i should pick the 24" over the 22" and i just trusted his judgment. i told him i was 6'2" but he argued that i looked taller than that. i would've argued back but i hadn't been to the doctor recently so i didn't know for sure how tall i really was.

    so i got the 24" and now i'm thinking that it does seem just a wee bit too big, but it's too late to return it now. i mean i can ride it just fine, but standing over it i only have about 2" of crotch clearance from the top tube - that's the main thing that bothers me. the other thing is that my old bike was significantly smaller and i kinda miss that feeling i had of just dominating over it.

    are there any advantages to having a larger frame? it definitely stands out on the bike rack at school, so that's pretty nice.

    still i think i would've asked for the 22" if i had been sure of how tall i was. a recent physical i had confirms that i am in fact 6' 2.5" tall.

  2. #2
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    do you feel stretched out on the bike? for sizing, you should be more concerned with the TT length than the stand-over.
    Oh noes. I'm going to drink the Kool-Aid.

  3. #3
    escapee
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    not at all. even sitting up straight my elbows are slightly bent, so that's good i think.

    however, for some reason it seems like my seat tube is taller than what it should be (judging from this picture). in that picture if you drew a straight line from the top of the seat tube across the bike, it would cross the top of the suspension fork. on my bike however, a line going straight across from the top of the seat tube would hit just a few inches below the headset - right between where the top tube and down tube meet up.

    i'm kind of a noob so maybe i'm just describing the mark of a bigger frame, but it sucks because i can't put my seat down nearly as far as the one in the picture could go.
    Last edited by friendzonehero; 03-27-2008 at 02:34 PM.

  4. #4
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    Reputation: laurenlex's Avatar
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    If you don't feel too stretched out, the frame might be OK. As stated before, the most important thing is the correct top tube length. If you have long arms a bigger frame might fit best, even though it gives you less standover clearance. Conversley, if you have long legs and short arms, you might want a shorter top tube with a really long seatpost. Bike sizing via chatting on the interent without pictures is kinda tough.

    As far as not being able to slam your seat down, I wouldn't worry about that at all, unless you are doing dirt jumping or stuff like that. I find my perfect seat height and angle, and never touch it.

    So if your bike is too big for you, and you can't swap frames, you can either:
    A. Put on a different stem
    B. Sell it
    C. RIde it as is

  5. #5
    escapee
    Reputation: friendzonehero's Avatar
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    thanks for the info lauren. i do have long arms and legs, and i was kind of wanting the option to put my seat down more occasionally because i do sometimes go play around on a dirt jump course near a trail i frequent.

    also though, i'm wanting to get a suspension seat post and i feel like the "perfect seat height" for me on this bike is just raising the post up no more than 2 inches. i don't know if i would be able to use that height with a suspension seat post installed, hence my frustration with the tall seat tube..

    here's a picture; does it look like i fit it well? https://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b...5/DSC05830.jpg

  6. #6
    MTB Addict
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    As long as you are comfortable on the bike, the frame size should be OK.

  7. #7
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    Your seat could go up a bit more. I ride a Trance X2, XL which has the same stand over (32.4"), but a longer T tube (25") then your 2XL YUKON (24.3") I am also 6'-2" so I understand why they put you on that frame. However the question is: which bike was more comfortable to ride? the XL or XXL....

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ray Lee's Avatar
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    I'm also 6'2 and your XXL/24 Giant's top tube is a hair shorter than my large/18.9 Prophet's and my XL/19.9 Cannondale F7 has a top tube of 25 inches versus your Giants 24.3 inches

    Before I bought the F7 I tried the Giant Yukon (just a parking lot) and the XL felt a bit cramped, I know there are many variables but top tube seems to be a very important for size, I cant see that seat tube is any good other than to figure how much seat post you will be showing once you get it set up correctly.

    It really only matter how it feels to you, but I think its the correct size from trying the XL Giant and riding my 2 bikes. as far as your image, it is more upright than my Prophet was, I bought a shorter stem with a little rise to get behind the bars, more like the posture in your picture as it works much better for me in the ruff stuff.

    I know its easy to get hung up on the "size label" maybe go try a XL somewhere I bet you will be glad you have the 24

    regards
    Ray

  9. #9
    Bionic Mtn Biker
    Reputation: 6milliondollarman's Avatar
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    The frame looks to be in the "right" range. Some people prefer to ride a bit smaller, some larger. As long as you're comfortable on the bike, you should be fine. The good thing is that you feel comfortable on this frame even when coming off a smaller bike. I wouldn't worry about top tube clearance as long as you can straddle the top tube with both feet planted firmly on the ground and not having the family jewels crushed. I probably only have 1/2" of clearance on my bike.

    I don't have any experience w/ suspension seat posts, but are you looking at something like the Thudbuster or Rockshox Suspension Seatpost? Check out their websites for minimum clearance, usually found in the faq section. For example, Thudbusters require 140mm from saddle rails to frame for the LT, or 98mm for the ST. BTW, where are the seat rails situated on the post? (middle, forward, back)
    Better than he was before. Better. . . Stronger. . . Faster. (but not smarter)

  10. #10
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    Funny... I'm 6'7" and I ride a 21 inch frame and it's pretty comfy. I don't feel like a curcus clown.

  11. #11
    Dirt Deviant
    Reputation: savagemann's Avatar
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    Judging from that pic, it looks like it fits you perfect. Frame sizes vary from manufactuer to manufactuer. One companies 21" might be like another companies 17" so the stated size doesn't matter much at all. It's how it feels. A 19" Marin would be like a 24" Giant or a 22" Spec and so on and so forth.

    Looks to fit you good, to me at least.

    BTW, on all my bikes I only have 1/2" clearance till I am hitting the high notes....LOL
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  12. #12
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    The fit looks right on. You may want to raise the saddle an inch or 2. Personally I'd go for a longer stem which would give you a bit better position for speed, climbing, and more cockpit room for pedaling out of the saddle. I'm 6-4 and rode 21 to 24" frames, all were ok.

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