I just got done riding and....- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    I just got done riding and....

    Hey guys, first post here. Well I just went on a nice 10 mile ride on a trail near my house. I had a problem on the way back. I did a little bunny hopping here and there, and I broke the plastic piece on the rear tire between the gears and tire. It really does not look like anything important. Is this something that I need on my bike? I bought my bike about 4 years ago it's a Diamondback Response.

    thanks alot

    Chris

  2. #2
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    basically everyone removes that plastic piece, or their bike didnt come with one to begin with.

    the plastic shield is there to protect the wheel from a poorly adjusted rear derailleur.. so make sure your limit screws are properly set and you wont have issues!

  3. #3
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    cool, thanks for the fast reply

  4. #4
    The Martian
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    I didn't take mine off (still have reflectors too *gasp the horror*), but it is something you can just remove and quite a few people do.

  5. #5
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    Quick question regarding that rear wheel spoke guard - if you remove it, won't there be a slight gap between the cassette and the end of the hub?

    It looks like at least on the Mavic hubs, the plastic spoke guard slides into the free hub body, and then the cassette then slides on top of that. If you remove that plastic spoke guard, I would think there'd be extra play in the cassette? I'm sure tightening the cassette down more may compensate for this, but not sure if it would do it completely?

  6. #6
    AKA Dr.Nob
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    Quote Originally Posted by solara
    Quick question regarding that rear wheel spoke guard - if you remove it, won't there be a slight gap between the cassette and the end of the hub?

    It looks like at least on the Mavic hubs, the plastic spoke guard slides into the free hub body, and then the cassette then slides on top of that. If you remove that plastic spoke guard, I would think there'd be extra play in the cassette? I'm sure tightening the cassette down more may compensate for this, but not sure if it would do it completely?
    This has absolutely NO impact on the free hub, cassette or anything if it is removed.

    Disclaimer: I have heard that Mavic may not honor any warranty claims if the spoke protector is removed but this may just be heresay.
    Not that all teenagers are evil mind, just most of them.

  7. #7
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    Remove your reflectors...

    Quote Originally Posted by CougarTrek
    I didn't take mine off (still have reflectors too *gasp the horror*), but it is something you can just remove and quite a few people do.

    The reason it's a good idea is that when (not if) one of them gets knocked sideways it will run through your fork or frame and wind up bending or breaking your spokes.

  8. #8
    The Martian
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC
    The reason it's a good idea is that when (not if) one of them gets knocked sideways it will run through your fork or frame and wind up bending or breaking your spokes.

    Yea, I've heard the arguments. Fact is I don't ride that hard. I think the chances of something happening where a reflector was my *ONLY* problem are mediocre especially compared to the chances of any one thousands of other potential issues on the trail. I'm probably just as, if not more, likely to bend my RD into my spokes, but I'm not going single speed any time soon either.

    And if I ever find myself in a situation where I'm not having to ride 20-30 miles on the road (where I'll mention a lack of reflectors is illegal) for every single trip to a trail head I'll consider removing them. In the meantime they aren't causing me any problems nor do I anticipate any problems despite the claims otherwise. Fact is I'm way more likely to damage my wheels in other ways not at all related to the stupid piece of plastic.

  9. #9
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    Whatever...

    Quote Originally Posted by CougarTrek
    Yea, I've heard the arguments. Fact is I don't ride that hard. I think the chances of something happening where a reflector was my *ONLY* problem are mediocre especially compared to the chances of any one thousands of other potential issues on the trail. I'm probably just as, if not more, likely to bend my RD into my spokes, but I'm not going single speed any time soon either.

    And if I ever find myself in a situation where I'm not having to ride 20-30 miles on the road (where I'll mention a lack of reflectors is illegal) for every single trip to a trail head I'll consider removing them. In the meantime they aren't causing me any problems nor do I anticipate any problems despite the claims otherwise. Fact is I'm way more likely to damage my wheels in other ways not at all related to the stupid piece of plastic.

    Since you're only as strong as your weakest link, it's your call. Relying on plastic reflectors (that are designed to be removed from your bike) to stay in place while mountain biking isn't a smart decision.

    It's an even worse decision to keep them on while riding on the road. Again your call.

    Your Camelbak and shoes likely cover you on the reflector requirement. I have a blinky LED ($5) light that attaches to my seatpost that covers me on that requirement.

  10. #10
    The Martian
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    the "weakest link" plastic reflectors have not budged one mm in 5 years of daily riding. Including two crashes that have caused obvious warping to my front wheel and multiple other involuntary dismounts of lesser magnitude.

    Meanwhile the rims have bent, my brake levers have snapped in half, RD minorly bent, computer fallen off and been eaten by the woods, front brake seized (on the roadie), etc...

    The reflector on my roadbike didn't budge when I completely shredded my front tire, rode the rim, and then skidded across the pavement into traffic either. It still hasn't moved, but I should probably file or replace the rim as it has two visible gauges out of it...

    Yes, they are unsightly and serve no purpose in the woods, but IMO they are no where NEAR the "safety hazard" some try to make them out to be.

    In fact, aside from people griping that they are "horribly unsafe" I've never heard one real account of them actually causing a crash or severe damage. Yet I see snapped carbon handlebars here at least once a month...interesting....

  11. #11
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    Hyperbole much?

    Quote Originally Posted by CougarTrek
    the "weakest link" plastic reflectors have not budged one mm in 5 years of daily riding. Including two crashes that have caused obvious warping to my front wheel and multiple other involuntary dismounts of lesser magnitude.

    Meanwhile the rims have bent, my brake levers have snapped in half, RD minorly bent, computer fallen off and been eaten by the woods, front brake seized (on the roadie), etc...

    The reflector on my roadbike didn't budge when I completely shredded my front tire, rode the rim, and then skidded across the pavement into traffic either. It still hasn't moved, but I should probably file or replace the rim as it has two visible gauges out of it...

    Yes, they are unsightly and serve no purpose in the woods, but IMO they are no where NEAR the "safety hazard" some try to make them out to be.

    In fact, aside from people griping that they are "horribly unsafe" I've never heard one real account of them actually causing a crash or severe damage. Yet I see snapped carbon handlebars here at least once a month...interesting....
    I don't know that I said they were horribly unsafe. I think I suggested removing them because they serve no function and can only harm your spokes.

    I'd love to see your once a month CF broken bars statistics. I'll even give you 12 x's/year.

    Perhaps I didn't stress this enough: Your choice. I choose to remove them. I've seen people bend their spokes due to the reflector turning.

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