i have a Q (is my bike good enough tp race)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: austin rr's Avatar
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    Idea! i have a Q (is my bike good enough tp race)

    is a trance 4 good
    i have put on
    marzochi 2008 XC 700 ATA fork
    avid juicy seven disc brakes
    azonic AZ-7 Bar

    is that good enough?

    and with all that, how do u start racing were are the races
    were do u sighn up(i have no clue)
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  2. #2
    AKA Dr.Nob
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    What kind of racing, Cross Country or Down Hill?

    You could definatly race XC on it.

    You would break too many things in a DH race.
    Not that all teenagers are evil mind, just most of them.

  3. #3
    local trails rider
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    If you are planning to enter your first XC race, just ride what you have. The best bike in the world will help you a little when you are good. Until then, just work on your fitness, skills and tactics on whatever bike.

  4. #4
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    oh ya
    i wanna do xc
    (what eles could i do)
    ive been training xc
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  5. #5
    jalopy jockey
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    If you can ride it you can race it.

    A better bike might shave some time. Even us scrubs would go faster if we had a couple less pounds, and faster shifts. But I plan on racing next year on a mid 90s cheapo, as well as my '07 fary Fisher Tassajara with upgrades. The cheapo is steadily loosing gears. blew out the front shifter and saw no reason to replace. Got the new ride over the summer, so no longer 'need' the old bike. It has horizontal drops so why not take her to the dark side.

  6. #6
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    cool
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  7. #7
    I live to bike
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    your bike is fine for racing. post in your local board to find some local races.
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  8. #8
    Rod
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    Your bike will do just fine in a race. In my first race I entered on a Giant Yukon. If you get serious about racing you might want to put your bike on a diet, but more importantly like someone else said you need to develop your skills, fitness, and endurance. It's not about the bike, but the rider. I won on my 32 pound Giant so don't worry about the bike and just have some fun.

  9. #9
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    alright thats what i hoped
    what cllases are there?
    (beginner, intermidiate?)
    is it setup like motocross or bmx?
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  10. #10
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    Run what you brung; it's 95% "motor" anyways.

    Jalopy, take a look on the MMBA classifieds. There have been a couple nice deals on wheelsets there recently. Then the only barrier to joyful riding on the Royce will be some spacers, a BMX cog (I have a 16t you can use), and about 20 minutes of wrenching.

  11. #11
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by austin rr
    what cllases are there?
    (beginner, intermidiate?)
    There are different classes but I think there are some local variations in what exactly they are.

  12. #12
    Rod
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    When I raced on the sheet there was beginner, sport - intermediate, expert. The beginner race was 10 miles 1 lap, sport 2 laps 20 miles, expert 3 laps 30 miles. There is also a place to sign up for first time racer, but I didn't see it on my signup sheet. I have heard people talk about it though. Stop by your lbs and talk to them about racing. They may have a schedule and if not they will be able to point you in the right direction.

  13. #13
    poser Administrator
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    You might want to start here: Reno Wheelmen and look towards their 2008 race series.
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  14. #14
    jalopy jockey
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by bh357
    Run what you brung; it's 95% "motor" anyways.

    Jalopy, take a look on the MMBA classifieds. There have been a couple nice deals on wheelsets there recently. Then the only barrier to joyful riding on the Royce will be some spacers, a BMX cog (I have a 16t you can use), and about 20 minutes of wrenching.
    Problem is it's too close to Christmas. I can't spend on myself but you can send Bridges the link and say this would look nice under the tree.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jalopy jockey
    Problem is it's too close to Christmas. I can't spend on myself but you can send Bridges the link and say this would look nice under the tree.
    If it's for a Christmas gift, howabouts I send her a photo of some Velocity rims laced to some King hubs, with a nice pretty bow on top . Oh, wait... someone else's Wife should get those photos.

    p.s. It takes about 10 minutes to swap out a set of tires .

  16. #16
    jalopy jockey
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    Quote Originally Posted by bh357
    If it's for a Christmas gift, howabouts I send her a photo of some Velocity rims laced to some King hubs, with a nice pretty bow on top . Oh, wait... someone else's Wife should get those photos.

    p.s. It takes about 10 minutes to swap out a set of tires .
    But with my current set-up of Bontager Camino rims laced to Diore hubs, it would a wise investment in time savings.

    P.S. if your wife gets the photos let me know. So I can make sure she gets the wrong size for you.

  17. #17
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    Sign up at the race

    They'll have a registration table where they'll take care of you. If it is a NORBA race you'll need a NORBA license plus the entry fee. I haven't raced in a couple of years but they used to sell one-day licenses or the annual. Beginner or Beginner-first timer. May not have the first-timer option. Show up plenty early to allow time for registration and warming up and trying to remember what you forgot. The Beginner races usually start first.

    If you train hard and think you are fast then go for the "holeshot"--try to get out in front before the singletrack. OR let the pack go and pick them off as you can. Middle of the pack is a great way to crash during the funnel. ALSO, do your damnedest to give room to overtaking riders or when passing (announce a side before you go by-and or note the side being called when getting passed). It's about the fun, don't take silly risks.

    Oh, and you'll surely meet other racers if you can ride the race course the couple of weekends before the race--and always the day before the race. Most folks are glad to help out.

    Hammer on.
    I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. W.C. Fields

  18. #18
    Rod
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    Wade gave you some pretty good advice. If you're in shape you need to get out toward the front. I would shoot for at least the top 5. The first and only race I participated in was a mass start. The experts in front, sport middle, and beginner in the rear. I was in the last row and had to pass almost everyone. Some people that were much slower than me got a better start so it was time and energy consuming, sprinting past someone at the only wide area, to get a good position. Also warm up before the race. If you're in the middle watch out for a mass crash or someone stalling. I was in a ditch beside the trail passing people who stalled on a small bank. I bet I passed 10 people. That wasted a lot of energy as well. A good start will cause you to avoid many problems.

  19. #19
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    Like others have said, if you can ride it, you can race it

    Honestly the one thing i have learned from competing in races is you do better with what your comfortable on, a few years back i spent a ton of cash upgrading my bike (idiotic...) just to get ready for one race in specific, and after i got done i felt that it was useless for spending the money when my bike was fine with what i had in the first place. Try racing before you decide on making upgrades, what you have now will get you by just fine and more then likely you will enjoy it more because you are used to the ride. Find out if you really enjoy racing first, then figure out if you "need" a new bike or "want" a new bike.

  20. #20
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    I raced 2 months ago in the chupacabras, with a boulder se, 7-speed, and a very crap suspension fork. were 100km and in some sections the terrain is irregular and downhill, my hands hurt because of the vibration the 'suspension' provoked.
    just changed to a jamis dakar 05 bike and although the splice comp is not a great suspension it really makes a difference doing its work on rough terrain.
    so if you will be racing get a decent suspension at least, depending on the race you will be entering.
    i overtook guys with 1000+ bikes with nice 9-speed drivetrains with a 300 bike, so only upgrade as those parts start breaking out. i'm also starting racing next year.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by giantyukon
    i overtook guys with 1000+ bikes with nice 9-speed drivetrains with a 300 bike, so only upgrade as those parts start breaking out. i'm also starting racing next year.
    Unlike motorsports, speed in bike racing has very little to do with $$$ and everything to do with training. If you train hard enough to be competitive, you'll break stuff training. Upgrade when you break stuff or wear it out. The only variation to that I recommend is brake pads--different pads (disc or rim) feel and perform differently, so if you feel a need to mess around with unbroken/worn stuff, start there.

    Also, never forget that to win a race one has to finish the race--so I always shop with durability in mind over weight. A few grams here or there don't mean crap when the stuff breaks during a race or on a long ride far from the truck. Contrary to popular consumerism--lightest ain't always rightest.

    Speaking of contrary, I ride a steel singlespeed with mechanical discs and an air/oil fork--going to a rigid steel fork when I get around to making one. I've eliminated shifting issues altogether and have a brutally simple brake system that'll run on crooked rims. All I have to worry about is the air in the tires or fork blowing out. ever.
    I would rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. W.C. Fields

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