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  1. #1
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    How hard will this be to put together? Iron Horse Warrior 3.0

    After much research, I just ordered an Iron Horse Warrior 3.0 from Randall Scott. I'm wondering what to expect. I've never put a bike together. Will it be completely unassembled when I get it? What kind of tools will I need? Can I do this or should I have it done for me? Any info will be appreciated.

    I am very excited about getting back into biking this summer, it's been at least 7 years since I owned a bike, and this will be my first good quality bike. I always rode the $100 bikes you can get at Target when I was younger. Not anymore!

    Also, if you have an IH Warrior 3.0, is there anything that I might want to upgrade right off the bat? Pedals? Seat? Anything?

  2. #2
    Forging Elite Awesomeness
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    It should be partially assembled (or partially unassembled depending on how you look at it) when it comes out of the box. All you should have to do is put in the seatpost/saddle, tighten down the stem, put the wheels on, take off some packaging, screw on the pedals, and make sure everything is good to go.

    A bike shop will be able to do it for you but save the money and have some fun doing it yourself. Congrats on the new bike!

  3. #3
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    All bikes come pretty much in the same state of assembly, or disassembly if you choose to look at glasses as half full.

    I have built hundreds of bikes, and they all go together pretty much the same. All you need is cutters for zip ties, tiny bit of grease for seatpost and pedal threads, and an allen wrench set. All Ibex customers have to build their own bikes, so this post from the Ibex forum will show your what you are in for. http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=266651

    When I am building my own bikes, I take much more care than just putting them together. I tension and re-true the wheels, wrap the chainstay, pre-stretch the cables, take the grease off the chain and put my own lube on, apply protective tape where rubs occur, and more little "touches".

  4. #4
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    Excellent. I'm feeling pretty good about this now. I'm definitely going to, as you say, take more care than just to assemble. That link looks like it will help a ton. Thanks!

  5. #5
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    You're gonna need 4-5-6mm allen wrenches a phillips screw driver, and a 15mm wrench for the pedals. I recomend getting a pedal wrench from a bike shop. Its worth the 10-15 bux. You can assemble a bike with a good multi tool made for bikes. Get one with a chain tool built in for future chain repairs.
    the bike will be 90% assembled out of the box, but make sure you have the tools I listed, plus a bike pump.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  6. #6
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    Check that every bolt and screw is tight. I lost 3 rotor bolts because i didn't check them (simply forgot). Also I has to adjust the front derailleur myself to get it to shift optimally. Overall the bike was very easy to put together, just check all bolts to be on the safe side.

    Btw, Randall Scott seems to have good customer service in case you ever need assistance.

    edit: Just for your info, I ordered an IH Warrior 5.0 from them about 5 weeks back. So far I'm very pleased with it.

    -LoneLord

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Imaginate
    Excellent. I'm feeling pretty good about this now. I'm definitely going to, as you say, take more care than just to assemble. That link looks like it will help a ton. Thanks!
    No problem. Do not be surprised if the shifting does not work real good at first or if the brakes aren't perfect. They are assembled... well, assembly line style and not always perfect. This link will tell you everything about adjusting stuff on your bike.

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/bikemap.asp

    After some adjusting and fine tuning on your part, your bike will run better than new when is is slightly used. This is why bike shops always give a "free tuneup". You will be way ahead of the game if you learn to do this stuff yourself, and will be self sufficient on the trail.

  8. #8
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    Don't over tighten the bolt that goes through the stem into the fork steer tube. It could kill the headset. Other than that, make sure everything is nice and snug. Rotor bolts you will also need to get a T25 torx driver for. Also available at a bike shop. Add that to the list of tools.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  9. #9
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    You may already have the T25 torx if you have a socket set or a multi tip screwdriver set. I found one in my multi screwdriver tips and used a small rachet/adapter. An adjustable wrench is handy to true the brake discs.

  10. #10
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    be sure to tighten (gently!!!) the top headset bolt before tightening the stem bolts.

  11. #11
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    Hey thanks everyone. This doesn't sound nearly as difficult as I had thought. I'm going to head to the bike shop right now to get a multi-tool and maybe some chain grease. Thanks again!

  12. #12
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    my very first time ever assembling a bike, it took me <1hr and less than 5 dollars in tools from walmart. basically if you can follow fairly simple instructions, you shouldnt have any problems at all.

    dont grease the chain!!! you need chain specific lube (very thin watery lubricant). you'll need the grease for other stuff, so its worth having too.. but dont grease the chain

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomsmoto
    my very first time ever assembling a bike, it took me <1hr and less than 5 dollars in tools from walmart. basically if you can follow fairly simple instructions, you shouldnt have any problems at all.

    dont grease the chain!!! you need chain specific lube (very thin watery lubricant). you'll need the grease for other stuff, so its worth having too.. but dont grease the chain
    Yeah, sorry didn't mean to frighten you there. I know what to get, I just used the wrong word for it...

    It looks like I actually already have everything I need in my toolbox besides the lube, but I'm still going to get a multi-tool to have when I'm actually out riding. Getting very excited, they shipped it today!

  14. #14
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    One thing that some aren't familiar with is presta valves - I wasn't before getting my bike. Don't know if the IH has them or not. If so, you will need an adapter for your pump if the pump doesn't fit presta valves. RS should have that info.

    Bikes usually ship with only 10 pounds of pressure in the tires. I have read posts where people assembled their bike, only to find that they couldn't pump up the tires - bummer. I know you're gonna be ready to ride it, so I mentioned it.

    Ooooooops. The correct spelling is presta.
    Last edited by rlouder; 04-02-2008 at 06:37 PM.

  15. #15
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    I don't know if this is the right info, but these are the tire/wheel specs from the Iron Horse website... I don't really know what they mean or if they tell you whether or not the bike comes with presto valves...

    RIM WTB SX-24 W/ EYELETS
    SPOKE 14/15G DB STAINLESS BLACK
    TIRES WTB WEIRWOLF 2.1

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Imaginate
    I don't know if this is the right info, but these are the tire/wheel specs from the Iron Horse website... I don't really know what they mean or if they tell you whether or not the bike comes with presto valves...

    RIM WTB SX-24 W/ EYELETS
    SPOKE 14/15G DB STAINLESS BLACK
    TIRES WTB WEIRWOLF 2.1
    Doesn't really tell you. If you don't want to call RS, adapters are only a couple bucks, at most.

    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...slisearch=true

  17. #17
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    I'm pretty sure it comes with schrader valves. I'll see if I can find out for you so you don't have to worry bout that.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  18. #18
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    Change Pedals!

    I hope others will chime in on this subject.Companies put plastic & nylon pedals on bikes to cut costs.These pedals can be very dangerous for anybody doing any serious riding.Get yourself a pair of aluminum body BMX style platform pedals,aluminum MTB pedals,or clipless pedals if your bike didn't come with them.

  19. #19
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    Assembling a bike for the first is definitely a fun and challenging experience. The first time I've done it, I've gone through so much trial & error, especially in cable adjustment, shifter tuning, brake pad adjustment & bolt tightening.

    Though it's not that difficult to assemble a bike, it's best if it's done right the first time. This is merely a suggestion - When you head down to your LBS to get tools, equipment, parts, etc, let the shop owner/mechanic know that you are in the process of assembling a new bike, & it's your first time. If the shop guys are pretty cool, they may offer to do it for free (since you're buying stuff already, and it's a good way to earn a loyal customer). If not, it'll probably cost around $25 labor. Ask to watch while they do the assembly and adjustments, and while you're there, they'll may even measure ideal seat height, lever placement, & bar width. They'll even offer tips on how to maintain your new ride. Think of it as an investment in a "mini class". That way, in the future, when you need to work on your bike, make repairs, swap parts, you have a good idea of how it's done.

    Also, a book like Zinn & the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance is valuable investment.
    Better than he was before. Better. . . Stronger. . . Faster. (but not smarter)

  20. #20
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by savagemann
    You're gonna need 4-5-6mm allen wrenches a phillips screw driver, and a 15mm wrench for the pedals. I recomend getting a pedal wrench from a bike shop. Its worth the 10-15 bux. You can assemble a bike with a good multi tool made for bikes. Get one with a chain tool built in for future chain repairs.
    the bike will be 90% assembled out of the box, but make sure you have the tools I listed, plus a bike pump.

    I would have to disagree. My simple 15mm wrench does the job very well and I've never seen a reason to torque the pedals on with more force that the pedal wrench would give me. Maybe I'm just a simple man though. Edit: Now that I think about it a pedal wrench would make getting the pedals off much easier when the time comes instead of me using a hammer on the 15mm wrench, but it does work.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  21. #21
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6milliondollarman
    Assembling a bike for the first is definitely a fun and challenging experience. The first time I've done it, I've gone through so much trial & error, especially in cable adjustment, shifter tuning, brake pad adjustment & bolt tightening.

    Though it's not that difficult to assemble a bike, it's best if it's done right the first time. This is merely a suggestion - When you head down to your LBS to get tools, equipment, parts, etc, let the shop owner/mechanic know that you are in the process of assembling a new bike, & it's your first time. If the shop guys are pretty cool, they may offer to do it for free (since you're buying stuff already, and it's a good way to earn a loyal customer). If not, it'll probably cost around $25 labor. Ask to watch while they do the assembly and adjustments, and while you're there, they'll may even measure ideal seat height, lever placement, & bar width. They'll even offer tips on how to maintain your new ride. Think of it as an investment in a "mini class". That way, in the future, when you need to work on your bike, make repairs, swap parts, you have a good idea of how it's done.

    Also, a book like Zinn & the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance is valuable investment.
    He brings up a good point. I got someone at my lbs to show me how he adjusts the rear derailleur and it's been invaluable. I could do everything else myself, but that was the one part I couldn't adjust just right. Just to give you a heads up some shops frown at getting bikes online. LBS lose a lot of business to online companies just b/c they can't compete w/ their prices.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod
    ...LBS lose a lot of business to online companies just b/c they can't compete w/ their prices.
    That's very true. It's hard to compete with online direct retailers due to pricing. That's why LBS's have to find other ways to be competitive, and one of those ways is through service and fostering relationships with customers, especially customers who are walking in for the first time with questions on how to assemble a bike . Having a great relationship w/ your LBS is second to none - the advice and information you learn is simply priceless.

    In that sense, when it's time for a customer to buy a new bike or part, or simply referring friends new to the sport, the LBS will be the first choice because of that relationship.
    Better than he was before. Better. . . Stronger. . . Faster. (but not smarter)

  23. #23
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    I've had pedals that a cresent wrench or a 15mm open end wrench will not fit on, due to a small space where the pedal wrench only fits. You could use a 15mm cone wrench for these types, but would ruin the cone wrench in no time. But there are pedals that you can't install with a regular wrench. i have 1 set on those types......short of using a vise grip needle nose, you need a pedal wrench for 15-20% of the pedals out there.
    But most you can put on with any regular wrench, but not all. I don't like the kind that don't have slots for a wrench, but only allen access on the spindle/axel. Those bug me.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  24. #24
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    Hey thanks everyone for all this info. This forum is awesome! I'm definitely going to be frequenting this place.

    I think I'm ready to go on this, I have all the tools mentioned in the thread here, I have a multi-tool, chain lube, and I just bought an air pump that came with a presta adapter so I'm all set there. I still need to get a helmet, probably next week sometime... As for the pedals, I dunno, I'm gonna check them out when I get it. Good pedals look to be fairly expensive, I'm probably going to have to wait a little while. I'm not that concerned as I don't plan on doing any riding that is too terribly aggressive for at least a month or two. But maybe next month I will look into pedals.

    Now the bike just needs to get here, tracking results say Monday!

  25. #25
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    Wait A Minute

    I too purchased my IH thru R S Cycle - I remember seeing that warranty literature required assembly by a "certified bicycle mechanic" for the warranty to be good.

    I know the assembly is basic, and I certainly could have done it myself to save a few bucks. I just didn't want to take the chance of voiding the warranty. Something like $40 - $50 at the LBS - and I have the receipt in case I need to make a claim. Something to consider.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by omegamandb
    I too purchased my IH thru R S Cycle - I remember seeing that warranty literature required assembly by a "certified bicycle mechanic" for the warranty to be good.

    I know the assembly is basic, and I certainly could have done it myself to save a few bucks. I just didn't want to take the chance of voiding the warranty. Something like $40 - $50 at the LBS - and I have the receipt in case I need to make a claim. Something to consider.
    I didn't realize this.

    I just got back from the bike shop. I talked to them about building my bike, they did (jokingly) give me a bit of hell about ordering it online, but they were very cool and said it'll be fine if I watch them do it. Which is awesome. So, I am going to go ahead and have them do the assembly. It'll get done faster, it will definitely be done right, and I'll get to watch and learn a few things. And I'll get the warranty coverage which is pretty important to me. Thanks for chiming in on that omegamandb

  27. #27
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    See - all good! You'll get some tips while watching, support your LBS, and have a valid warranty. When they ribbed you about the online purchase, did you remind them that's the only place to get a new IH?

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