How do you know if a chain is "worn out"?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How do you know if a chain is "worn out"?

    A newby question, but I guess thats what this forum is for right? I have been racing by XTC 29er for 2 seasons now and have about 1500 Cross Country miles on it. I haven't had any chain issues but I can see it coming. How do you know when it is time to replace? Lately I am having a hard time getting my rear derailiar dialed in, and I am wondering if it is because my chain is "bending" too much and not being forced from one cog to the next as well as it should be??

    Any advice?
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Chain Maintenance with Sheldon.

    12 link pairs. measure. a new chain will be 12 inches
    more than 12 and 1/8 inch new chain and cassette.
    12 and 1/16 inch new chain.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  3. #3
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    Bike shops have a chain gauge they use. I generally just get a new one every season....only $30.

  4. #4
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    Check this out

    http://www.parktool.com/product/chai...indicator-cc-3

    I bought one, and caught my chain in time at .075 replaced it tonight, and no skipping or jumping. If you let it go to 1.0 you'll probably have to replace the cassette, jockeys and the chain ring /s on the crank. Very easy to use.

  5. #5
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    great info! Thanks!

  6. #6
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    A ruler is better than most "chain wear guides" they tend to give a false reading ie too worn.

    Otherwise count out 50 pairs (100 links) which should be 50 inches. If your chain is half a pair (1 link) longer than it is 1% worn (0.5 of an inch over 50 inches). You can do this by placing your worn chain next to your new chain.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi
    A ruler is better than most "chain wear guides" they tend to give a false reading ie too worn.

    Otherwise count out 50 pairs (100 links) which should be 50 inches. If your chain is half a pair (1 link) longer than it is 1% worn (0.5 of an inch over 50 inches). You can do this by placing your worn chain next to your new chain.
    One of my chains that had seen over 10,000miles since 2003 (before I realized the importance of changing chains sooner) Still only managed 1.0 on the CC3 tool. I may aswell keep running with that one, since everything else is probably too worn now.

    My other bike that had seen far less mileage had a .75 on the CC-3. I replaced it with a brand new chain and everything is working perfect.

    Just my experiences. The CC-3 is only $8, and it's quick and easy. No room for error.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kettlebiker
    A newby question, but I guess thats what this forum is for right
    Absolutely. And nothing is more stimulating than a good question about chains. Be sure to ask about lube sometime.

    You can buy chain-wear gauges. There are some issues with using such gauges, and sometimes they indicate wear on a brand new chain. The uber-reliable method is actually the one put forth by mitzikatzi. Sometimes I'll use a gauge for a quick sanity-check, but I also try to make time to measure with a ruler a few times during the season, as mitzikatzi describes.

    If you use the ruler method, it helps to close your chain using something like a SRAM Powerlink. That way, you can take the chain off easily to measure it.

    Edit: I was just being a bit humorous above in my comment about lube. Please don't take it the wrong way. Chain maintenance is important. Hence it tends to be frequently discussed.

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