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  1. #1
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    How do I corner a bike?

    I've been biking for over a year, but still I haven't figured out how to corner a downhill turn properly. I either have to slow down to a crawl or I get highsided and fly into rocks. Can anyone explain proper form for cornering or refer me to something that can? Thanks for any responses.

  2. #2
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    I think you have to lean more, though i am kind of unsure about the whole leaning thing. I am tall and see other tall people some will lean more then the bike (the bike is more upright then their body) and some lean the bike more then their body. which is right?

  3. #3
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    Reputation: BlueTrain's Avatar
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    lean
    weight outside pedal

  4. #4
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    Outside leg down with your weight on the pedal
    Inside hand pushing the bar down.
    Lean into the turn.
    Be prepared to get everything up right after the turn, or snap it over for the next turn. Find a favorite section of a known trail and practice. Scrub off the speed prior to the turn and then pedal out of the turn. Think about carrying more speed every time you go down that section of trail. Clear your mind of the highside thing, it's f'n you up. Keep doing it over and over until you're happy, then get a friend who is faster to hang on your back wheel and push you...then you'll go even faster.

    Good luck.

  5. #5
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    Reputation: Ken in KC's Avatar
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    ^^^Good Advice Contained Above^^^

    Quote Originally Posted by .40AET
    Outside leg down with your weight on the pedal
    Inside hand pushing the bar down.
    Lean into the turn.
    Be prepared to get everything up right after the turn, or snap it over for the next turn. Find a favorite section of a known trail and practice. Scrub off the speed prior to the turn and then pedal out of the turn. Think about carrying more speed every time you go down that section of trail. Clear your mind of the highside thing, it's f'n you up. Keep doing it over and over until you're happy, then get a friend who is faster to hang on your back wheel and push you...then you'll go even faster.

    Good luck.
    ***Disclaimer*** This is building on .40AET's advice.
    The only thing I would add is that some of the technique depends on whether you have a FS or a HT.

    On a FS, your weight should be on the rear shock to compress it and decompress it as you're coming out of a turn.

    On a HT, your weight should be toward the front of the bike to dig your front tire in.

    ***Disclaimer*** This is different than .40AET's advice.

    Another approach is to keep your pedals level, your weight centered over the bike and move the bike underneath you through the turn. Basically you're flopping the bike toward the inside of the turn at its apex while you're staying in the same position to keep the bike upright and moving through the turn.

    Still, your braking should be done prior to the turn and you should be prepared to pedal once you're past the apex of the turn.

  6. #6
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    Good stuff posted.

    This is more general info, and you might already be doing this, but becoming a better bike handler takes moving around on the bike. You can't just leave 70% of your weight on the seat and 30% on the bars and steer like in a car. You have to shift around on the bike depending on the situation.

    On steep ups, you lean way forward to weight the front tire so it doesn't leave the ground.

    On steep downs, you lean way back so your face doesn't hit the ground.

    In corners, you lean inside to put your weight on the inside knobs of the tire.

    If this is not natural to you, you can easily practice just riding along. Throw all your weight over the front wheel, lean way back, move side to side on top of the bike so the top tube hits your thighs. Lean the bike over at a 45 degree angle while going straight forward.

    Hope this helps, or at least makes sense.

    PS. Glance at picture threads in the "expensive bike" forums, like Turner, Titus, Yeti, Ventana, etc... Lots of experienced riders with photos of good technique.

  7. #7
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    ^^^That's a really good idea^^^

    Quote Originally Posted by laurenlex
    Glance at picture threads in the "expensive bike" forums, like Turner, Titus, Yeti, Ventana, etc... Lots of experienced riders with photos of good technique.
    This is a great idea.

  8. #8
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    Most of the quick manuvering I do on my bike I barely even turn the bars. I usually bob and weave like Muhammed Ali. Float like a butterfly and sting........well, you get the idea.

    You gotta move your weight around. Simply steering the bike with the handlebars is sure disaster if you're not moving around on the bike.

    Pumping the bike at crutial portions of a turn will dig the tires in, and keep traction.

    I dunno, for me it's kinda hard to put all these feelings while on the bike into words.........It just takes feel, and years of riding. I've never really tried to explain it until now. But the best advice I can give is to move your weight around on the bike. Move back for down, forward for ups, and move with the turns....not against them.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  9. #9
    Big Wheeler
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    watch a motorcycle race

  10. #10
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    On a road you lean the bicycle inside the turn, keep the pedals in the 6-12 position and stick out the inside knee. On a trail you rarely have enough traction to bank the bike without risk of falling on your side. Besides, on rough terrain it is better to keep the pedals parallel to the ground, which makes sticking the knee out ineffective.
    So the best way to move weight inside the turn is, in my opinion, lowering the inside shoulder, almost touching the bars and applying force to turn the bars.

  11. #11

  12. #12
    Just Wanna Ride!
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    Some good descriptions above. Also take a look at the 'bikeskills' videos for some good technique. Here is a clip on switchbacks that includes technique and line choice for downhill swithcbacks. Highsiding may have to do with your body position over the bike the switchback video talks about position over the bike - among other things.

    http://mtbpath.com/riders/videos/id_...m-switchbacks/

    Also check additional clips under the 'video' headings and 'other bike videos'

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