How are bikes shipped from online dealers?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    jco
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    How are bikes shipped from online dealers?

    I'm looking at a couple of bikes from JensonUSA but am not entirely comfortable building a bike from a collection of parts. If I purchase through JensonUSA, will the bike be shipped partially built? I noticed they included videos on the Rocky Mountain bikes, demonstrating the partially assembled bike and a how-to for finishing the build. However, the assembly of other brands is not given. Anyone have any info?

  2. #2
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    Here is how my bike came from Airborne


    Basically the stem was flipped to fit,so I flipped that. Installed the front wheel and rear derailleur and dropout. Then put the back wheel on. Installed the seat. Then you need to adjust the derailleurs and set up the bike.

    Your LBS can put it all together for $50-60 usually if you don't have the tools or knowledge.

    I had never assembled one before but I'm mechanically inclined. It's kinda crappy to build a bike without a work stand. That is definitely on my to get list.

  3. #3
    1/2 fast or 1/2 assed?
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    You could just call your LBS and see what they charge. I was considering a bike from Amazon and called my LBS about it and they said yeah. I forget how much though. Ended up not buying from Amazon.
    I'm a ******bag in real life so I dont have to be one on the interwebz.

  4. #4
    Merendon Junkie
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    this is the El Mariachi getting unpacked when it arrived from hucknroll.

    Unpacking The Salsa El Mariachi 3 - YouTube

  5. #5
    jco
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    Thanks for the info everyone. I'll look into what my LBS can do for me.

  6. #6
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    It's generally not hard to put together. It can be a little tougher to adjust and dial in the derailleurs.
    Just because you can't hear them scream doesn't mean they don't. Save a plant, eat meat.

  7. #7
    May The Force Be With You
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    .commercial to residential might cost some more.. you might be able to save a few $$ also by having it shipped directly to the LBS
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  8. #8
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    Jenson does a pretty good job with completes - I bought one and everything was adjusted, I just installed the front wheel, seat and post, and bars. It was much more assembled than the Airborne above. Backcountry, CC, and HnR are/were even better. Bikes Direct on the other hand must drop ship from China - I got a bike from them once and it was a beat up poorly packaged POS - what a joke.

  9. #9
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    bought a tallboy LTC from colorado cyclist. They installed everything then detached the rear derailleur, bars,wheels and seat.

    All the cables were still connected so I just had to reattach the hanging parts. It only took about 15 minutes to put back together.

  10. #10
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    If you assemble your own bike, you will have a deeper love for one another. It's really not hard and it is winter. Probably 4-8 hours of reading 4-6 hours of assembly (with beer breaks) and another $200-$300 worth of tools (depending on whether you buy al-la-carte or a kit (which will of course give you five phillips head screwdrivers you already have better ones of) back to the topic. No one will ever service your bike as good as you eventually will learn to. But aw'heck you probably just want to get out an'ride and who does't understand THAT!



    Plan B: Ask around who is the best guy or local lbs wrench around to help you out! And oh yeah, YouTube probably has a bunch of "How to put a MTB together" videos.

    Good Luck With You Bike,

    Hank
    Last edited by DirtyHank; 01-08-2013 at 03:58 PM.

  11. #11
    ready to ride
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    From Jenson's website
    "Every bicycle sold by Jenson USA includes free assembly by our trained mechanics prior to shipment. The build level will vary based on the bike you select and is identical to the quality work we perform on bicycles sold in-person at our physical locations."

    I think they have videos for some bikes. Here is one for a Rocky Mtn FS
    Rocky Mountain Element 10 Bike '12 > Complete Bikes | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop
    Sent via my heady vibes from the heart of Pisgahstan

  12. #12
    govt kontrakt projkt mgr
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    Competitive Cyclist will ship a completely assembled bike via freight truck for sale price of bike plus 329$. Others will build it like how you'd pack it up for an airline trip. You have to put the handlebar and pedals and wheels on. Maybe a little more. Easy-peasy.

  13. #13
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    Bikes direct and some others simply ship the bike as is from the factory...same way a bike shop gets their Treks, Specialized, etc. In this case they need some work to get them right. Some, like Jenson (I believe), do a "Pro Build" where they actually put it together, adjust everything, then pack it back up.
    Last edited by TiGeo; 01-08-2013 at 08:36 PM.
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  14. #14
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    Quote Originally Posted by shwinn8 View Post
    .commercial to residential might cost some more.. you might be able to save a few $$ also by having it shipped directly to the LBS
    Yeah, good luck with that

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    Bikes direct and some others simply ship the bike as is from the factory...same way a bike shop gets their Treks, Specialized, etc. in this case they need some work to get them right. Some, like Jenson I believe, do a "Pro Build" where they actually put it together, adjust everything, then pack it back up.
    This.
    When we get bikes shipped from the factory, they are sometimes a lot of work to transition to the sales floor. Wheels no where near optimum tension, headsets and bottom brackets/cranks assembled with impact drivers, etc. A lot of headset adjustment, hub adjustment, wheel truing, cable/housing running, and brake pad (road/mountain) adjusting is neccessary. Keep in mind this is from a factory to a shop though, and I'd assume that shipped to end-user bikes are more complete.

  16. #16
    jco
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    Cool, this is a lot of good information. Maybe I'll suck it up and assemble it myself. You guys are awesome.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley View Post
    Yeah, good luck with that
    hhmmmkay...
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkidd_39 View Post
    Here is how my bike came from Airborne


    Basically the stem was flipped to fit,so I flipped that. Installed the front wheel and rear derailleur and dropout. Then put the back wheel on. Installed the seat. Then you need to adjust the derailleurs and set up the bike.

    Your LBS can put it all together for $50-60 usually if you don't have the tools or knowledge.

    I had never assembled one before but I'm mechanically inclined. It's kinda crappy to build a bike without a work stand. That is definitely on my to get list.
    FYI we aren't packaging our bikes exactly that way anymore. The current models are packaged with the rear wheel on the bike already.

    We were finding that having the rear wheel off would occasionally allow the rear dropouts to get bent if there was a hard impact to that area of the box (like if it was dropped off the back of the Brown Santa's truck for example). Having the rear wheel on helps eliminate that issue for the most part, plus is less work for the person putting the bike together also.

    Thanks!

    Jeremy
    Please Note: I no longer work for Airborne. If you have an Airborne question or problem please contact them directly.

  19. #19
    Sno
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    Quote Originally Posted by abelfonseca View Post
    this is the El Mariachi getting unpacked when it arrived from hucknroll.
    Dude that was a hella funny video.

  20. #20
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    While it's fairly obvious where parts belong once you unpack your new bike, it is wise to have somebody (who is familiar with building bike) put it together for you if you are uncomfortable doing it. Mainly because there are specific torque and angle adjustments needed.

    I assume that you want to purchase your new bike online to save a few bucks? If so, I suggest that you have a friend who has experience with building bikes do it for you then. Probably less expensive than a your LBS will charge.

    But consider this. Your LBS receives bikes the same way you will if you order one online. If your LBS is one that has a good reputation with others in your area, why not buy the bike from them? The pluses are that your new bike will already be fully assembled and should be mostly adjusted already, too. Of course, they will fine tune the fitment to your body also. They will also work with you on any issues your new bike may have for some time. You will help keep a local business alive by spending your money there. You will build a relationship with them also. You can save a lot of money by buying last year's models when they are available. Their help and assembly are included in the price you are paying.
    life is... "All About Bikes"...

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by abelfonseca View Post
    this is the El Mariachi getting unpacked when it arrived from hucknroll.

    Unpacking The Salsa El Mariachi 3 - YouTube
    Is this a garage or carport? It looks nice for either with the wooden ceiling.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ambassadorhawg View Post
    But consider this. Your LBS receives bikes the same way you will if you order one online. If your LBS is one that has a good reputation with others in your area, why not buy the bike from them? The pluses are that your new bike will already be fully assembled and should be mostly adjusted already, too. Of course, they will fine tune the fitment to your body also. They will also work with you on any issues your new bike may have for some time. You will help keep a local business alive by spending your money there. You will build a relationship with them also. You can save a lot of money by buying last year's models when they are available. Their help and assembly are included in the price you are paying.
    In addition, you may be able to get freebies thrown in or they will build the bike for free. And don't just think that because the brand isn't on the show floor that they can't order one in. Sometimes it's nice also to have a LBS in the mix if you have frame or other manufacturer problems in the future.
    Just because you can't hear them scream doesn't mean they don't. Save a plant, eat meat.

  23. #23
    Merendon Junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Is this a garage or carport? It looks nice for either with the wooden ceiling.
    Thanks Hack!

    I define it as a garage as it has 3 walls but no gate enclosing the 3 walls. Here most houses already have walls and gates around the property so most garages are open.

    Abel

  24. #24
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    You will be repaid many times over on the trail for your efforts to learn bike assembly and tuning. You'll recognize problems and have a solution sooner and before stuff breaks.
    It isn't really just a bike. It's more a piece of high performance equipment under significant stresses. You'll push it more and more. It needs to work right evert time, for hours.
    Maintain it for fun and safety and avoid walking out..

  25. #25
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    ^Totally agree

  26. #26
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    i bought a giant yukon from this place.
    they build bike, then adjust shifting,brakes and stuff.
    then take off front wheel , seat and bars.blah blah ...
    and repack back in same box.
    30.00 shipped.

    Mtn Bike Closeouts: Bicycles For Sale | Mountain Bikes | Cruisers | Road Bikes

  27. #27
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    I got two bikes from bikes direct, and they were pretty easy. Attach on the pedals and front wheel, and put on the handle bars. The handlebars/stem were the hardest part simply because you want to make sure you get the tension on the headset bearings right. Look up some videos and it's easy.

  28. #28
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    do 2 things,

    #1- call them and ask specifically what will be involved once you get it off your doorstep it's probably different between different models they sell, sizes, and what fits in the box.

    #2- find someone in your local riding group who works on bikes on the side for fun, they probably have al the park tools in the world and find out what kind of beer they like =]

    #3- have fun!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    You will be repaid many times over on the trail for your efforts to learn bike assembly and tuning. You'll recognize problems and have a solution sooner and before stuff breaks.
    This was a big reason I wanted to do my first build. I didn't want to get caught with a break out on a trail with my pants down. That kept spiraling and I did my first fork rebuild this year.

    And as I side benefit, I save $$ by not having to take it to the shop for repairs.
    Just because you can't hear them scream doesn't mean they don't. Save a plant, eat meat.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jco View Post
    Cool, this is a lot of good information. Maybe I'll suck it up and assemble it myself. You guys are awesome.
    and...?

    Hank

  31. #31
    jco
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyHank View Post
    and...?

    Hank
    Incoming new bike! Jenson had some really good sales that I simply could not find locally, so I went through them.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by jco View Post
    Incoming new bike! Jenson had some really good sales that I simply could not find locally, so I went through them.
    Jenson Rocks

    Hank

  33. #33
    jco
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    Update: As stated previously, I ended up purchasing a bike through Jenson (2012 Rocky Mountain Slayer 30 for 35% off). It arrived today. As far as assembly was concerned, I simply had to install the seatpost, front wheel, and handlebars, so it was not as bad as I imagined it might be.

  34. #34
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    Be aware: the drivetrain and brakes will most likely need adjustment as well. I would also check and make sure all other bolts are tight (suspension pivots, etc).

  35. #35
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    Nice reply...... I agree

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley View Post
    Be aware: the drivetrain and brakes will most likely need adjustment as well. I would also check and make sure all other bolts are tight (suspension pivots, etc).
    This is a great idea. I'd hope Jenson would have adjusted all this, right? Backcountry and CC even true the wheels quite well.

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