Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    17

    Idea! help me getting new all arround MTB :)

    Hi all,
    i am new to forum wanna say hello to all of you .

    Its amazing what u can read here and see ...

    Last couple of years i am searching for bike , i finally decided to grab one.

    I need recomendation / advise what will be best for my purposes :

    i am 6.3ft and 208pounds

    i am in training and in good condition overall

    my budget is from 2-3k$ usd ( will get used bike since i can get better bike for my budget )

    i live 1mile from local forest and i will use bike for uphills

    downhills-dont need crazy speed i need more stable and with good breaks and goos stearing

    downhill trough forest - again need stable bike with best breakes and stability / good steering

    riding trough forest terrain / sometime can bu muddy but not very often

    any chance if u can give me advise what bike will be best for me let me know .

    I have been offered so far with :
    kona process 153
    specialized enduro 2017 limited edition ohlins coil
    marin 2018 full suspension
    specialized enduro comp alloy 650b 27.5
    scott spark 700rc
    whyte t-130c
    consider my constitution and needs i really need ur help

    alao dont pick bikes from my list ,
    u can recomend me whichever u think will fit me

  2. #2
    Lone Wolf
    Reputation: Osco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,775

    Cool-blue Rhythm

    The name painted on the bike means less than you think.
    Crappy bikes don't sell, well only at walmart and big box stores they do, I'll give you that one.

    All the bikes you listed and many more are all going to be top shelf bikes.
    A rider can learn to get the best from a bike if he/she sticks to it, learns proper setup, gets some skills training and rides the bike often and KEEPS it for a while.

    Go out to your trail head and ask the riders why they ride what they ride and ask them about the Local bike shops.

    From your question I think you will do best with the support and knowledge of a good local bike shop that knows what works on the trails you want to ride.

    Test rides,
    I see many test rides in your future grasshopper :P

    A good bike shop that has a rental fleet will deduct the cost of a few rentals from the purchase price of a bike once you choose.

    You say your training and In good condition, If you are riding now and not new to this sport you would be far better off renting several bikes.

    They all have similar components, the more you spend the better the gear.

    Test rides will let you feel out different frame geo's, wheel sizes and more Importantly frame sizes.
    At 6' 3" you will most likely end up on a XL frame, BUT this makers XL will be different than that makers XL.
    One bikes seat angle, another's Stack height, again a another's chain stay length and a half degree different head tube angle, all these will make bikes of the same frame size respond differently and will feel vastly different.
    An experienced rider can wring out the best from most any bike with most any combination of these frame geo terms.
    Riders with Intermediate skill levels will also learn each geo but will do better with certain ones.. ONLY test rides will tell you unless you got tons of experience.
    Treks come in what,,,five sizes ? I think..

    A slack plus tire'd Hard Tail bike was for me better than a sharp geo Full suspension bike in almost all of my trail conditions.
    I found I was faster, could ride farther and have more fun with far less bike maintenance and setup time with my hard tail plus bike.
    The only thing I ever adjust for different trail conditions is tire pressure.

    Buy the bike that helps you the most where you are the weakest.
    If climbing Is hardest for you, buy a good climber. (That's me, I did just that)
    If you want to go really fast in corners look for long low and slack Geo,,Umm
    Thats me again...
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,668
    Many of the bikes you list are optimized more toward descending; longer travel, lower, longer, slacker, which compromises climbing, tight maneuvering, and flat speed. This type of bike is often referred to as "all mountain". From the description of your intended riding, I'd suggest considering bikes with around 120mm travel, a category usually referred to as "trail bikes."
    Do the math.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: armii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    718
    In your budget you should be able to find a used Giant Trance Advance carbon, or even a new Trance aluminum. for me this is one of the best bang for the buck bikes out there.
    I am also fond of the Santa Cruz Bronson, and the Salsa Red Point.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    The name painted on the bike means less than you think.
    Crappy bikes don't sell, well only at walmart and big box stores they do, I'll give you that one.

    All the bikes you listed and many more are all going to be top shelf bikes.
    A rider can learn to get the best from a bike if he/she sticks to it, learns proper setup, gets some skills training and rides the bike often and KEEPS it for a while.


    Thats me again...
    Well, first of all thank you for taking ur time to make answer and big post
    on my request , means a lot !

    I am readin it and gatherin much more info now .

    One problem i have is that i live in small town / poor country and i dont have shop bike where i can test drive bike of my need. Its great information that u can test bike and than u can get better price cose its used/demo its great tip .

    Definetly i will not go crazy with bike i will get full protective equipment for knees , head and so on and will improve my skills over time . Will try learnin bike and landscape where i will rock but again safty is on first place here .

    Reason why i want bike is i have tons of strees at my job, professional poker player job is exhausting and stressfull as hell, and riding bike in nature with adrenalin shocks will help me in process of recovery . Mind , soul and body will recover in that way . I am doin regular excersises 4-5 days / week but thats
    not enough , and i dont have strenght to do more than this.

    Also when i was 15-16years old ive got some mtb with suspensions and i occasionaly drived trough forest and downhill and still remmember those adrenalin attacks which is amazing .

    To me name of bike or price tag means nothing, its just important to have : secure, stable, and to fit properly to me bike that i will enjoy and take care of it everyday .

    Again thank you all for tips keep em coming , i will read and respond. And will let u know what i ended up buyin


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    721
    For 2-3K you can get a very nice NEW trail bike and not have to worry about analyzing a used bike. If you are in a small town that doesn't have a large MTB community, it is no fun trying to find a good used bike.

    A lot of what you have listed are nice bikes, but probably too much for a new rider.

    Some new options might include the Marin Hawk Hill, Rift Zone, and B-17; the YT Jeffsy; the Canyon Spectral. All of these bikes are well-reviewed and liked by their owners. They have modern geometry and quite decent component sets, particularly for a new rider.

    If you have to buy without being able to ride or even sit on the bike, that's ok, because you are pretty clearly an XL in most bikes (see their frame geometry and fit chart).

  7. #7
    Lone Wolf
    Reputation: Osco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,775
    I second TwiceHorn on everything said.
    New would be best for you,
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  8. #8
    Lone Wolf
    Reputation: Osco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,775
    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Many of the bikes you list are optimized more toward descending; longer travel, lower, longer, slacker, which compromises climbing, tight maneuvering, and flat speed. This type of bike is often referred to as "all mountain". From the description of your intended riding, I'd suggest considering bikes with around 120mm travel, a category usually referred to as "trail bikes."
    Very good advice, you listening Kurgan ?

    Think of trail bikes as a good middle ground for most riding.

    Think of All mountain as leaning more to 'Enduro' or more for harder riding as in getting more air time(Bigger Jumps), working rockier boulder strewn trails at faster speeds.

    As you add suspension travel you add weight, Increase setup complexity,
    and loose some efficiency. This you will feel BUT a stronger rider more skilled rider will adjust to an All Mountain bike In no time.

    We set up suspension so we use 90% of the travel, reserving that last 10% for our screwups.

    A 120 mm travel bike will be setup to use 90% as would a 160 mm travel bike.
    the same hit on the 120 mm bike Is handled with a stiffer setup.

    When pedaling you will loose efficiency on a longer travel bike more than a shorter travel bike partly because the suspension set up is softer so you can use all that 160mm of travel when needed.

    Excessive suspension movement sucks watts from your pedal power, that's one big factor you will feel when climbing or riding flatter open trails.

    The Scott Bikes have a fantastic twinlock system,, I had it once, loved it.
    Still have the remote fork lock out on my hard tail and use it often :P
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    23,915
    I imagine that your job allows you to travel some. I'd recommend using some of that travel to visit shops in some larger cities that have more selection of bikes and bike shops. Maybe even places to rent bikes. That's going to give you more feedback on which styles or models fit the way you want to ride than anything we say.

    The small town availability issue exists in places all over the world. Your options are to travel to where you can find bikes to buy in person, or purchase online and have them shipped. You won't find many people selling used bikes willing to ship internationally, so I think restricting your search to used bikes is unnecessarily limiting. But still, you'll have to verify that any seller is willing/able to ship to your country. Brands like Canyon, YT, and similar internet direct-to-consumer brands should be on your list. You won't find any on a showroom floor anywhere, but if they will ship to you, they're viable options.

    At this point, I'm going to suspect that you don't know what you don't know, and with the language barrier of trying to communicate in English on this website, that there are certain things that you won't be able to pick up from us. You simply just need to find some bikes that you can ride so you can choose what you like.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    17
    ty all for tips i readed em carefully and understood more and i made a decision

    i purchased following bike :

    niner ros 9 aluminium , xl frame size , with following equipment :

    Frame: ROS 9 alu (size: XL)
    Fork: Rockshox Pike 130 mm Boost
    Wheels: American Classic Terrain 110x15, 12x142 XD
    Front tire: WTB Vigilante Comp
    Rear tire: WTB Vigilante Comp
Tube: Topfun
    Front brake: SRAM Level LT
    Rear brake: SRAM Level LT
    Front disc: Formula C1 180 mm
    Rear disc: Formula C1 160 mm
    Bottom bracket: SRAM NX GXP 175 mm 30 teeth
    Bearings: SRAM GXP
    Chain: SRAM NX Eagle
    Cassette: SRAM 1275
    Rear derailleur: SRAM NX Eagle
    Shifters: SRAM NX Eagle
    Stem: TFHPC Comp 80 mm
    Handlebar: TFHPC aluminium
    Headset: Niner
    Grips: TFHPC Silicone (black)
    Seatpost: Rockshox Reverb 31.6 (stealth)
    
Saddle: WTB Volt Comp (white)



    was last one and on discount , costed me 1.800$ with ship , which is good deal i can say .

    i will let u know impressions when it arrive



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    jcd's best friend
    Reputation: Battery's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1,261
    Nice! Make sure you share a photo when you have the chance. By the way, I see you live in Serbia. Have you checked out Chain Reaction Cycles? They are in the UK and you can probably grab bike parts and upgrades from them as you ride that bike. They ship worldwide too.
    Trek Emonda | Transition Sentinel

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,410
    Quote Originally Posted by kurgan999 View Post

    niner ros 9 aluminium , xl frame size , with following equipment :
    I am very confused- did I miss the point when Niner started making an aluminum ROS 9? that was always a steel bike, to my recollection.

    I would be curious to see the original listing for this sale. sounds fishy.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I am very confused- did I miss the point when Niner started making an aluminum ROS 9? that was always a steel bike, to my recollection.

    I would be curious to see the original listing for this sale. sounds fishy.
    here is spec, bought in 100% trusted and legit shop:

    Frame: ROS 9 alu (size: XL)
    Fork: Rockshox Pike 130 mm Boost
    Wheels: American Classic Terrain 110x15, 12x142 XD
    Front tire: WTB Vigilante Comp
    Rear tire: WTB Vigilante Comp
Tube: Topfun
    Front brake: SRAM Level LT
    Rear brake: SRAM Level LT
    Front disc: Formula C1 180 mm
    Rear disc: Formula C1 160 mm
    Bottom bracket: SRAM NX GXP 175 mm 30 teeth
    Bearings: SRAM GXP
    Chain: SRAM NX Eagle
    Cassette: SRAM 1275
    Rear derailleur: SRAM NX Eagle
    Shifters: SRAM NX Eagle
    Stem: TFHPC Comp 80 mm
    Handlebar: TFHPC aluminium
    Headset: Niner
    Grips: TFHPC Silicone (black)
    Seatpost: Rockshox Reverb 31.6 (stealth)
    
Saddle: WTB Volt Comp (white)

    maybe they thinked steel so put wrong info idk ?!



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  14. #14
    ●●●●●●●●◌◌
    Reputation: phlegm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,087
    The ROS 9 is a steel bike. Strange, doesn't seem to be offered any longer on their site (?):
    Bikes

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    The ROS 9 is a steel bike. Strange, doesn't seem to be offered any longer on their site (?):
    Bikes
    i bought from one store which is official niner dealer for spain territory , and i guess its from older stock .




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,410
    probably not a big deal. somehow the difference between aluminum alloy and other metals doesn't translate well from English to Spanish. I doubt anyone bothered to make a counterfeit ROS9. do you have a link to the original listing?

    I had a ROS9 briefly and I didn't like it for reasons specific to my riding style. it is a very stout, strong bike that many people love, so it should be good for you.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    17

    help me getting new all arround MTB 😊

    if its allowed here is post , if not moderators should delete

    www.topfun.com

    is site


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  18. #18
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    23,915
    Quote Originally Posted by kurgan999 View Post
    if its allowed here is post , if not moderators should delete

    www.topfun.com

    is site


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    they're only showing the ROS9 frameset now. they don't list a material, but I'm amused that they list the "specialty" as "enduro" for a frameset that appears to come with a rigid fork. I'm sure it's a translation thing.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    17
    Beast arrived yesterday, cant wait to try it out






    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  20. #20
    ●●●●●●●●◌◌
    Reputation: phlegm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,087
    Nice!

  21. #21
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,981
    Sweet ride! Congrats!!
    The Orange Fleet:

    '16 SC Heckler
    '14 All City MMD
    '12 Kona Unit Rigid

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    57
    That's a nice bike. Does anyone else feel like the pick of the derailleur on the smallest cog looks like maybe the chain is about a link too long?

Similar Threads

  1. Help Getting a new MTB
    By that1guyinwi in forum Minnesota, Wisconsin
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-24-2016, 05:37 PM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-18-2007, 10:50 PM
  3. Good Tire For all-arround riding ?
    By Megaclocker in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-29-2007, 11:18 AM
  4. 06 Z1 Light ETA & 05 All Mtn 1 TST/ETA not getting all travel...
    By SingleTrackHound in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-23-2007, 11:04 PM
  5. Best light for arround $100
    By Guital2 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-14-2005, 07:03 AM

Members who have read this thread: 89

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2018 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.