help!- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 30 of 30

Thread: help!

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    15

    help!

    I am currently starting to get into all mtn. mtn biking and need some help on what kind of bike to start out with i do not want to get anything really expensive right now. just something to get me started.. Any addvise???
    Last edited by chr.webb; 04-26-2011 at 10:23 PM.
    CHR<WEBB

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,457
    Welcome,
    Buy something used. Bikepedia website can give you specs before you go over to look at it.
    Think any cyclist, even with minimal experience, would agree that buying cheap stuff is a waste of time and money.
    If we're talking HT (hard tail), front suspension only, you'll need to spend around 600+ to get something durable, and that functions well if looking at new, but can get that same bike with little wear for half that price used.
    My .02
    Round and round we go

  3. #3
    Still New
    Reputation: gemini9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    513
    I just bought a bike from bikesdirect.com. I was very satisfied with the service and bikes they offered. You can get a pretty good deal on there and you'll save a couple hundred dollars. You'll have to assemble part of it yourself and adjust the gears and brakes yourself though. Just have to make sure you get one according to their size chart and make sure it fits you. But you can get a decent 3-4 hundred dollar entry level bike there and still have some money left over for much needed accessories.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    15

    thxs

    thank yall so much. how do i know what size bike to get?? and what is a good helmet to get??
    CHR<WEBB

  5. #5
    Still New
    Reputation: gemini9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    513
    1. How tall are you? 2. Good advice is usually to not skimp on a helmet. it's gotta be comfortable and remember, it's gotta save your life.

  6. #6
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,172
    Height, inseam, weight, budget would be good allow $50-100 for accessories to be safe. Buying used like themeat said is always a good idea if you have a lower budget.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    13
    Chr. You probably want to visit a bike shop and ride a few around. That won't always be the best indicator of what size you should get from another brand, but it will give you a rough ballpark. The area you'll be riding in is a mixture of light downhill and cross-country so you should consider a full suspension XC or an all-mountain although the all-mountain bikes are generally a bit more expensive.

    As for the helmet the same thing applies. I bought a helmet pro-form this year and even though i followed the measurement guide it was still too small. I'd suggest heading into your bike shop/ski shop and trying on a few. Also, I used to not really be a full face helmet guy, but after seeing too many people bust their chins I decided it was the way to go. You can find decent deals on helmets on amazon and I'm sure some other places, just make sure that it's not a piece of junk.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,457
    Quote Originally Posted by gemini9
    I just bought a bike from bikesdirect.com. I was very satisfied with the service and bikes they offered. You can get a pretty good deal on there and you'll save a couple hundred dollars. You'll have to assemble part of it yourself and adjust the gears and brakes yourself though. Just have to make sure you get one according to their size chart and make sure it fits you. But you can get a decent 3-4 hundred dollar entry level bike there and still have some money left over for much needed accessories.
    Don't forget that you'll most likely have to true rims and tighten spokes.
    I'm glad you took my/our advice and got rid of the wally world ride. Like I/we said, Bikedirect is a great source. Enjoy.
    Round and round we go

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    15
    i am 5,5 and weigh about 140. an yes i am wanting a full face helmet
    CHR<WEBB

  10. #10
    Single Speed Nation
    Reputation: great_big_abyss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by themarmot
    Chr. You probably want to visit a bike shop and ride a few around. That won't always be the best indicator of what size you should get from another brand, but it will give you a rough ballpark. The area you'll be riding in is a mixture of light downhill and cross-country so you should consider a full suspension XC or an all-mountain although the all-mountain bikes are generally a bit more expensive.

    As for the helmet the same thing applies. I bought a helmet pro-form this year and even though i followed the measurement guide it was still too small. I'd suggest heading into your bike shop/ski shop and trying on a few. Also, I used to not really be a full face helmet guy, but after seeing too many people bust their chins I decided it was the way to go. You can find decent deals on helmets on amazon and I'm sure some other places, just make sure that it's not a piece of junk.
    For the record, bike shop employees hate when people come in to test ride bikes, use up our valuable time, then go purchase a bike from the internet. If you're going to use a bike store as a resource when shopping for a bike, the least you could do is support your local economy and purchase from your LBS. The level of service you'll get from those guys once you've purchased the bike will be unparalleled. Not to mention, the bike will come completely and properly built and tuned, and most bike stores have a service plan (5 years free annual tunes, for example).

  11. #11
    Still New
    Reputation: gemini9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    513
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat
    Don't forget that you'll most likely have to true rims and tighten spokes.
    I'm glad you took my/our advice and got rid of the wally world ride. Like I/we said, Bikedirect is a great source. Enjoy.
    When I ordered mine from BD I was worried about the rims being true, but it shipped okay. the wheels are straight. no wobble in them or anything. Rims are true. Or at least they seem to be. I would recommend BD to anybody looking for a good deal/on a budget. Was easy to assemble, frustrating to adjust, but everything seems fine.

    Bike shops offer the free adjustment and setup and come already assembled though, so that's one good reason to go that route. It's hassel free.

  12. #12
    Still New
    Reputation: gemini9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    513
    Quote Originally Posted by great_big_abyss
    Not to mention, the bike will come completely and properly built and tuned, and most bike stores have a service plan (5 years free annual tunes, for example).

  13. #13
    Single Speed Nation
    Reputation: great_big_abyss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    133
    If you're set on buying from the internet, and are having a hard time fully tuning your bike, take it to a bike store. As long as it's all basically assembled, you can usually get a basic tune done for about $40 which will involve adjusting the brakes and drivetrain. The tech will usually also check the wheels for true and tension, as well as making sure the hubs, bottom bracket, cranks and headset are all properly tightened/adjusted.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    27
    buy from a shop they are there to help you, not to rip you off. The can guide you to the right bike for your needs and price range and have the know how to size you right without guessing, and the ability to service your bike.

  15. #15
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,172
    Quote Originally Posted by great_big_abyss
    For the record, bike shop employees hate when people come in to test ride bikes, use up our valuable time, then go purchase a bike from the internet. If you're going to use a bike store as a resource when shopping for a bike, the least you could do is support your local economy and purchase from your LBS. The level of service you'll get from those guys once you've purchased the bike will be unparalleled. Not to mention, the bike will come completely and properly built and tuned, and most bike stores have a service plan (5 years free annual tunes, for example).
    This I agree. Online may be cheaper but you have to do your own leg work and research and buy then put together. LBS have to stock the product and keep up the inventory, employ people, pay rent, ect. It just plain rude to used them mainly to window shop so you can get it cheaper elsewhere, how would you like it if someone pull this on your business.

  16. #16
    Single Speed Nation
    Reputation: great_big_abyss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885
    This I agree. Online may be cheaper but you have to do your own leg work and research and buy then put together. LBS have to stock the product and keep up the inventory, employ people, pay rent, ect. It just plain rude to used them mainly to window shop so you can get it cheaper elsewhere, how would you like it if someone pull this on your business.

    In today's world of cheap internet goods, it's an ongoing source of frustration. BUT, every person that walks through the door has to be treated like a potential paying customer.

  17. #17
    Still New
    Reputation: gemini9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    513
    One of the bad things about the LBS, is that when I went in, they didn't have much to choose from. The had a couple giants, but none that I liked. Cost was about $475 and didn't have disc brakes.

    You all making me feel bad now lol I went into the LBS, talked to the guys, looked at the bikes and then went to BD cuz of the cheaper prices. I feel guilty lol

  18. #18
    Single Speed Nation
    Reputation: great_big_abyss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by gemini9
    One of the bad things about the LBS, is that when I went in, they didn't have much to choose from. The had a couple giants, but none that I liked. Cost was about $475 and didn't have disc brakes.

    You all making me feel bad now lol I went into the LBS, talked to the guys, looked at the bikes and then went to BD cuz of the cheaper prices. I feel guilty lol

    Sorry, I don't mean to make you feel bad.

    Spending a few minutes talking to a guy at a store and standing over a few bikes to check size is one thing, and perfectly acceptable.

    It's something completely different having a sales guy dedicated to you for an hour, do a complete sizing, try out several bikes and do test rides, just to have the customer buy online.

    If you can't find the selection you like, talk to your LBS about it. Prices are often negotiable, and models can be ordered in. If the price is firm, you can often negotiate many 'extras' out of the deal. 50% off a helmet and gloves is a starter.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    685
    I agree to a point...it's up to the LBS and the sales guy to make their pitch on why you should buy from them as a long term value proposition rather than a single transaction bottom line decision. If the story is compelling I'll spend more today to save over the long run, but you have to tell me that story.
    Quote Originally Posted by ridelikeafatkid
    "MOMMY, I WANT TO RIDE LIKE THAT FAT KID!" true story.

  20. #20
    Still New
    Reputation: gemini9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    513
    OP
    Just make sure when you make your decision, you post us some pics of the new ride.

  21. #21
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,172
    Quote Originally Posted by trboxman
    I agree to a point...it's up to the LBS and the sales guy to make their pitch on why you should buy from them as a long term value proposition rather than a single transaction bottom line decision. If the story is compelling I'll spend more today to save over the long run, but you have to tell me that story.
    While that's a valid point, the reality is most newbie who walks into the LBS would have a sticker shock, if they are not prepared. Most common reaction is what's the difference between a $125 WallyMart and $4000 premium. There's no easy to soften the blow explaining the truth that the premium product are more superior. $3875 more superior? Well pick a side

    I'll say this wrenching your bike is the best thing you can do as a mountain biker, it does come at a price. You have to learn to do it and you have to have the tool to do it. If you are a MacGyver that can wrench anything in front of you then you've got it made, that's only leave you with buying tools. A basic tool kit that would fix/maintain 75% of you bike start around $50-100 and can go all the way up to $500. It's the 25% specialty tools that cost a lot like head set press, facing tool, wheel true stand, bike stand, bleed kit, ect. Plus the fact that you have to warranty the job you did yourself.

    You can get a bike of same brand for $300 less than your LBS but if you don't have the tool or know how it can already cost you $60-100 to have your shop put the bike together then when things go out of tune and you have to bring it back it's another $15-50 each time for labor it add up quick your $300 saving may not be a good overall saving in the long run.

    To OP the entry level Hardtail bike start from $300-500, Full Suspension from $700-1200. If it falls somewhere in your budget then head out to your LBS and enjoy.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    15
    https://imgur.com/KuB6x bought this bike today thaxs for all the help today
    CHR<WEBB

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by great_big_abyss
    For the record, bike shop employees hate when people come in to test ride bikes, use up our valuable time, then go purchase a bike from the internet. If you're going to use a bike store as a resource when shopping for a bike, the least you could do is support your local economy and purchase from your LBS. The level of service you'll get from those guys once you've purchased the bike will be unparalleled. Not to mention, the bike will come completely and properly built and tuned, and most bike stores have a service plan (5 years free annual tunes, for example).
    Seriously, LBS' need to pull a stick out of their ass and adjust their business/marketing models. I've worked in ski/snowboard shops and myself and everyone else was always willing to sit down with a customer and figure out what they needed and give them sound advice, even if we knew they were just internet shopping b/c at the end of the day if you stop acting so prissy and help people they will come back to you when they need repairs or even possibly for quick purchases which really add up over time.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vtmusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    45
    We've got an awsome LBS here and their prices are damn close to online so I always go with them.Shop local, support your local economy! It only makes sense.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885
    While that's a valid point, the reality is most newbie who walks into the LBS would have a sticker shock, if they are not prepared. Most common reaction is what's the difference between a $125 WallyMart and $4000 premium. There's no easy to soften the blow explaining the truth that the premium product are more superior. $3875 more superior? Well pick a side

    I'll say this wrenching your bike is the best thing you can do as a mountain biker, it does come at a price. You have to learn to do it and you have to have the tool to do it. If you are a MacGyver that can wrench anything in front of you then you've got it made, that's only leave you with buying tools. A basic tool kit that would fix/maintain 75% of you bike start around $50-100 and can go all the way up to $500. It's the 25% specialty tools that cost a lot like head set press, facing tool, wheel true stand, bike stand, bleed kit, ect. Plus the fact that you have to warranty the job you did yourself.

    You can get a bike of same brand for $300 less than your LBS but if you don't have the tool or know how it can already cost you $60-100 to have your shop put the bike together then when things go out of tune and you have to bring it back it's another $15-50 each time for labor it add up quick your $300 saving may not be a good overall saving in the long run.

    To OP the entry level Hardtail bike start from $300-500, Full Suspension from $700-1200. If it falls somewhere in your budget then head out to your LBS and enjoy.
    Owning a bike is a learning experience and you guys should promote that.
    Last edited by themarmot; 04-28-2011 at 10:53 AM.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by vtmusher
    We've got an awsome LBS here and their prices are damn close to online so I always go with them.Shop local, support your local economy! It only makes sense.
    I totally agree, if prices are close than go there, but not if they're marking up for no reason. Seems like a lot of LOL's I mean LBS's just go for the car salesman tactic. It's not right and they claim when their sales suck that it's everyone elses fault for not using a LBS.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885

    I'll say this wrenching your bike is the best thing you can do as a mountain biker, it does come at a price. You have to learn to do it and you have to have the tool to do it. If you are a MacGyver that can wrench anything in front of you then you've got it made, that's only leave you with buying tools. A basic tool kit that would fix/maintain 75% of you bike start around $50-100 and can go all the way up to $500.
    DIY is a good point, but I bought a $25 kit that did 99% of everything i needed it to. The rest was some cleaner and grease. The tool kits you see out there are nothing but fluff. They make you think you're getting an optimal tool, but really you're getting a screwdriver with a nicer grip. Same thing. If you need a very specific tool then buy one, don't spend $ on a kit that does 'everything' because you won't need it.

  28. #28
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,172
    Quote Originally Posted by themarmot
    Seriously, LBS' need to pull a stick out of their ass and adjust their business/marketing models. I've worked in ski/snowboard shops and myself and everyone else was always willing to sit down with a customer and figure out what they needed and give them sound advice, even if we knew they were just internet shopping b/c at the end of the day if you stop acting so prissy and help people they will come back to you when they need repairs or even possibly for quick purchases which really add up over time.

    Did you own or run a shop where you have to meet payroll or rent, ect? If you just work there what incentive did you have for more sales as to more people in the shop? Business owners don't care how many people in the shop asking question they care more about the bottomline. Of course they do that with providing great information and service most know that it's cheaper to keep the existing customer than attracting new ones.

    What you were suggesting OP was to go try the bikes at different LBS as well as accessories then go online to make cheaper purchase, WTF. What kind of business model should any business adjust to. If more people do this pretty soon the bike shops would have to charge more to make up for the lost sales or worse gone out of business and we are all stuck buying online.

  29. #29
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,172
    Quote Originally Posted by themarmot
    DIY is a good point, but I bought a $25 kit that did 99% of everything i needed it to. The rest was some cleaner and grease. The tool kits you see out there are nothing but fluff. They make you think you're getting an optimal tool, but really you're getting a screwdriver with a nicer grip. Same thing. If you need a very specific tool then buy one, don't spend $ on a kit that does 'everything' because you won't need it.

    Define 99% of everything.

    Learning to wrench it yourself is great if you have patience and time, some people don't have one or the other or both, some just don't have it in them. That's why LBS is a good choice for them. Wrenching bike take learning curve and much steeper curve when it comes to components and compatibility. It's best for some people to buy from LBS especially the one that offer lifetime tune up, you can try doing yourself and if you mess up the shop can make it right. Just because you have a bike and tools and internet don't expect to become an expert mechanic that can diagnose symptoms that's happening to the bike it takes time to learn all that.

    If you have a bike that's already set up and you just maintain it you pretty much can get away with a "y" or 2 to cover 2-2.5-3 and 4-5-6 and a t25 torx. Cleaning or swapping out cassette require 3 more tools, cranks a few more and so on. I have a few bikes so I feel that it's a reasonable to own specialty tools so I don't have to run to the shop every time I need the headset swap, ect. It took a few years to build up the tools inventory or spend big chunk at once.

    There's an easy way to buy and the hard way to buy. Easy is to research the model and price and set realistic goal, bargain the whole package with service and discount from your shop and slowly build up your mechanic skill to maintain your bike.

    The hard way is to get the cheapest way to get a bike and learn as the problem arise and get the tool ask many questions on forum on what happen to your bike and how to fix it gather more tools needed to get the job done, and all else fail bring it to the shop and get it fix properly.

    I paid my dues I can build and strip the bike so I have choices of what and where to buy, if you can do that then you can buy from cheapest source. I still support my local bike shop 50% of my purchase. The last complete bike I bought was from LBS

  30. #30
    Single Speed Nation
    Reputation: great_big_abyss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885
    If you have a bike that's already set up and you just maintain it you pretty much can get away with a "y" or 2 to cover 2-2.5-3 and 4-5-6 and a t25 torx. Cleaning or swapping out cassette require 3 more tools, cranks a few more and so on. I have a few bikes so I feel that it's a reasonable to own specialty tools so I don't have to run to the shop every time I need the headset swap, ect. It took a few years to build up the tools inventory or spend big chunk at once.
    Depending on the bike and what kind of brakes it has add a 10mm combination wrench. If the bike has a nutted axle (front or rear ....common on lower end bikes) you'll need a 17mm wrench.

    A chain breaker and some extra power links or quick links is essential for trail use (broken chain) and also for general maintenance. No better way to keep a chain looking like new than to take it off and scrub the hell out of it.

    I find that having an 8mm Allan is necessary for making sure your crank bolts are tight. Many lower end bikes have a square taper bottom bracket that can loosen off quite easily. I find it's smart to regularly make sure your crank bolt is tight. At the same time, if you purchase a crank puller, it can make cleaning your chainrings and around your bottom bracket shell a whole lot easier.

    Finally, the best thing you can buy before you start wrenching on you bike is a book. Park Tool makes a great bicycle maintanance book, and will go through basic maintenance, as well as disassembly and reassembly of the entire bike. Haynes also has a book. These books come with detailed step by step instructions, and include pictures of every step.

    I'm a big advocate of DIY wrenching. I'm also a big advocate of cleaning your bike. A clean bike is a smooth running bike and breaks down less. They're also easier to work on.

    Finally, your LBS is there to help you. If you run into any problems, they're a wealth of information. If you build a good relationship with them, and get to know a lot of the guys there (they ride bikes too...and are always looking for ride buddies) they'll be inclined to show you how to do certain things (like repacking a hub, for example, or the best way to tweak a derailler).

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.