Good beginner bike for training- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Good beginner bike for training

    My current bike is an electric commuter bike for city riding, but recently got interested in trail riding. What budget bike would you recommend for training purposes, a bike I'll surely crash and bang up alot. Want to learn some basics first, small drops, manual, corning, bunny hop etc training. Wanted a cheap bike to learn on before spending on a good bike, any advice appreciated.

  2. #2
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    What are you training for? When you say training, it means you are training for something specific such as racing. You can ride pretty much any bike you can afford and do all the basic stuff that you mentioned. Starter bikes are very strong and can take the abuse. Check out a Specialized Pitch or maybe a Trek Marlin to start your search.
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  3. #3
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    Thank you for the recommendation Battery.
    Training as in I've zero experience with trail riding, just to train the basic moves for safe riding. All my riding currently are done on a electric commuter bike to work on perfectly paved roads.

  4. #4
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    Glad that you are now interested to a non-electric bike. I am recommending Raleigh if you want a cheap one.

  5. #5
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    Get something cheap from craigslist or fb marketplace and see if it's your thing.

  6. #6
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    define "budget." if you're looking for something to ride real trails and you want it to not hold you back and last a long time, a new bike is going to start at about $1,000.

    however, there's nothing stopping your from riding a 10+ year old bike if the frame is the right side and nothing is broken. something like that can be found on the used market for under $300.

  7. #7
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    Thank guys for all the advice!
    Just want something to start on very easy trails, I'm 50yrs old, don't need anything too crazy until I develop some basic trail riding skills, $500 +/- bike will do. There are just too many bike brands out there, and I'm a total newbie, not a clue which companies make solid bikes, or which ones are just big box store junks. On buying used, I'm not knowledgeable enough to be able to tell if the bike is in good working condition or not, so will probably prefer to get one new.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madox View Post
    Thank guys for all the advice!
    Just want something to start on very easy trails, I'm 50yrs old, don't need anything too crazy until I develop some basic trail riding skills, $500 +/- bike will do. There are just too many bike brands out there, and I'm a total newbie, not a clue which companies make solid bikes, or which ones are just big box store junks. On buying used, I'm not knowledgeable enough to be able to tell if the bike is in good working condition or not, so will probably prefer to get one new.
    Simple, don't go to big box store and visit your local bicycle store. The only difficulty currently is their stock of baseline entry bikes are slammed and selection limited. I think around $500 and up you might have better luck.
    Pretty much all the brands carried by bicycle stores are decent, Giant, Trek, Specialized, GT, Cannondale, etc. REI actually carries decent stuff too and their house brand is comparable.

  9. #9
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    The best bike for learning is going to be the bike that is best suited for the terrain you are riding. there's no such thing as "training" to ride trails. you just ride the trails and see how gracefully you can do it. if you can't, you walk certain segments and learn quickly what your limits are by falling once in a while. yup, you're going to fall at some point. get used to it.

    bikes in the $500 range are often not very durable and the flimsy components could be a detriment to your learning process. $500 is about the cheapest bike you will find in any bike store that is remotely trail-worthy, you're looking at the bottom of the barrel right now.

    important right now is the fact that bike shops are out of stock on LOTS of bikes due to the pandemic/ lockdown, but entry-level bikes sold out even faster than the higher-end ones. sorry I don't have anything encouraging to say about that other than "good luck."

  10. #10
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    Thank you for the advice, yes absolutely I'll be falling here and there. Also the reason just want a beginner bike, for I won't feel that bad destroying a budget bike haha. Just looked online at local bike shop, the only entry level bike in stock is the Haro Double Peak 29 Trail for $729, think I'll go pick one up.

  11. #11
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    that looks like a good start. manage some way to carry drinking water and wear some sort of glasses to keep debris out of your eyeballs.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madox View Post
    Thank you for the advice, yes absolutely I'll be falling here and there. Also the reason just want a beginner bike, for I won't feel that bad destroying a budget bike haha. Just looked online at local bike shop, the only entry level bike in stock is the Haro Double Peak 29 Trail for $729, think I'll go pick one up.
    That looks like a good starter bike. It should hold up pretty well. If you thrash it hard, yes itll wear out faster, but it looks to be good enough that you can gain a lot riding it!

  13. #13
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    It will take years before you learn all of those skills so buy yourself a decent bike. Itís unlikely youíll destroy a decent bike as a beginner. If anything, experienced rider will more likely to wreck a bike than a beginner. The former rides faster on more gnarly terrain with bigger drop, jump, rocks etc.

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