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  1. #1
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    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting

    Thinking about going for a ride tomorrow at a local park if we don't get rain. Until now, i have only ridden around my neighborhood to make seat adjustments. I doubt i do a real trail tomorrow so it will mostly be through some wooded areas and around Tanglewood park. Is there anything i should listen or feel for as i get use to the bike to give me an idea of any issues? Its a 2018 Pitch Expert. I know it doesn't have any air fork but i don't see myself during extreme trails just some paths to clear my head and get some exercise and see if i get hooked. I always have the option to upgrade the fork later. Couple pics of her cleaned up and ready to ride.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-fullsizeoutput_1109.jpg  

    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-img_9765.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Did you buy the bike used? If new, the LBS should have checked it out when they built it. But yeah, if a bike has issues, you'll often hear it. Look for some beginner trails in your area, mountain biking is really fun!
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  3. #3
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    Chazpat, I bought it used with about 20miles on it and 1 month old. The original owner's wife bought it and road it about the local lake here but when she realized it was a mens bikes, she said she didn't feel comfortable on the bike anymore. He said it was a mental thing so he went out and bought her a Kona and he had a Chisel. I hope to find some more beginner trails.

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    Watch for shifting feel.
    If it wasn't ridden much the shift cable housings and ferules will compress a bit. This puts the shift out of adjustment. You'll need to adjust the barrel adjuster at the rear shifter, or use the barrel adjuster at the derailleur or possibly retension the cable at the rear derailleur.


    Take a look at the up to down plane of the derailleur and also see if there's any twist in it too.

  5. #5
    jcd's best friend
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    My best advice is to not overthink things. Just go out and ride! I encounter new riders almost every single time I head out. I tell them the same thing. Just go out there and have fun learning.

    You should also get yourself a small saddle bag and chunk your personal stuff in it. Amazon sells them cheap. I picked up a huge saddle bag for $7 for my road bike. I would also toss in a multitool so you can make small adjustments as you ride out there.

    Also, don't be intimidated by the more experienced riders. Eventually, you will end up on their level assuming you stick it out.
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  6. #6
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    Thanks EB1888. Thanks Batter for the advice as well. So i went out today around 10am and started riding the walking paths and may a few passes. I saw plenty of people walking but no bikers until my 2nd pass. I saw two guys cut off the pavement and go on a trail one with a helmet and one without ( i didn't bring a helmet as i only planned on riding the walkway). As i kept riding i saw them come out near the park offices so i figured that must not be that far of a ride since it was about 10-15 mins. After making another pass, i didn't see any other bikers and thought to myself, this would be perfect time to go on a trail and not hold anyone up so i took it off-road. Not knowing what to expect even though i have watched others videos and read a lot, you really can judge how fast things come up on you. I guess its like watching a fast car at the track and driving a fast car at the track. Your reaction time in the stands always seems faster than sitting at the starting line. Granted my bike is a 27.5 and this was my first time venturing out but I LOVED IT. Seeing roots and trees on other videos doesn't do it justice. They come up so fast and the turns get narrow fast and my bike picked up speed to me fast just coasting at times but i am new so i have nothing to compare it to. I road on the train for maybe 30-40 mins as once i made it to the offices, i turned around and tried another path but had no idea where it would lead me so U-turned after a while and made my way back to familiar area. I kept telling myself to make sure i star off the seat so i can handle the roots and sharp turns. The hydro Brakes in my opinion did great and i didn't feel like the front end was a pogo-stick or like i was getting beat to death. But again i don't have comparisons but i will go back and try it for a longer time frame and hopefully i will pick a day when its not crowded so i can take my time and get a feel for it more. Now i understand the different techniques i have been reading about and how they come into play.

    Battery, i grabbed some water wicking cargo shorts to throw keys and phone in and i have an older saddle bag off my older bike which i will take next time. I did go by my bike shop afterwards to look at small pumps and they have a specialized one for $30 that goes up to 120psi called the Air Tool Flex Pump, It has a flexible head which Schrader and Presta but I'm not sure if thats a good deal or not. Over-all I enjoyed it and felt like i had a good workout. I didn't notice any shifting problems and brakes definitely grab when you want them too. Next time i will take my helmet and probably wear some long socks. I'll grab some gel gloves as after a while, i started to feel it some in my hands. (any recommendations?)

  7. #7
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    Always wear your helmet! Protect your brain man, the only one you got

    Troy Lee Designs makes some very affordable full finger gloves, with no padding and are very comfortable, but that's a personal thing you might need to try a couple of different styles.

    Also, I wouldn't worry about holding anyone one up, if you are respectful, just acknowledge the rider behind you and stop as soon as its safe and away from the trail, one of the reasons head phones on the trails are an issue.

    Congrats on the bike and have fun! You will be addicted in not time!
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    mountain biking is really fun!
    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    I LOVED IT.
    Told ya!

    Yes, wear your helmet next time. Glad to hear you enjoyed it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    Battery, i grabbed some water wicking cargo shorts to throw keys and phone in and i have an older saddle bag off my older bike which i will take next time. I did go by my bike shop afterwards to look at small pumps and they have a specialized one for $30 that goes up to 120psi called the Air Tool Flex Pump, It has a flexible head which Schrader and Presta but I'm not sure if thats a good deal or not. Over-all I enjoyed it and felt like i had a good workout. I didn't notice any shifting problems and brakes definitely grab when you want them too. Next time i will take my helmet and probably wear some long socks. I'll grab some gel gloves as after a while, i started to feel it some in my hands. (any recommendations?)
    I love this pump: https://www.fanatikbike.com/collecti...s-klic-hv-pump

    It has a magnetic hose and stores inside of the chamber. It also pumps very well too! You can also attach the clip to your frame using the bottle holder bolts. I refer to this pump as my Jedi lightsaber (my kids love it).

    Regarding gel gloves, do your hands go numb or ache after riding? Some of the pain may be your form and placing too much weight on your hands and wrists. Biking relies on core strength. I find that gel gloves are too bulky and doesn't let me feel the grips. I like to use minimalist style gloves primarily for protection should I crash. The gloves I like to use are the Specialized Enduro (not the bike).

    You can also upgrade your grips. Most riders (to include myself) use ODI Rogue grips or some other ODI grip model. The Rogue grips were recommended to me by Harold and they definitely help with trail vibrations and big hits!

    Here is a link to what they look like:https://www.fanatikbike.com/collecti...-lock-on-grips

    BTW I live in WA state and Fanatik Bike is just north of me which is why I keep linking them!
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  10. #10
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    JCD46 and Chazpat, i will definitely wear a helmet next time and there will be a next time. I do have some bear claw grips that are on the bike. The palms remind me of when I'm lifting but it could be form and position as well. I will look at the Troy Lee Design gloves as well

    I may find a t-shirt that says Slow Moving farm vehicle until i get up to speed

    battery, just watched the vid on that pump. Its really nice. Im going to keep an eye out for it just in case they offer a sale or free shipping. I did try on some gloves at the shop which were Specialized and they did seem very minimal which is probably fine. i will have to try on some as suggested to see what fits or feels best. I attached a pic of the grips i have currently.

    Any multi-tool suggestions or are they all the same?

    THANKS
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-img_9293.jpg  


  11. #11
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    Yup, just get out and ride! When u were a kid did you sit around figuring out what u needed? Nope! As you get into it youll start figuring things out. If anything, the things to watch out for are other trail users. Be aware of them, try not blow by them without warning. And yes, wear your helmet, it not so much the speed as the distance to ground that causes trauma, and paved paths are hard. Also get gloves, in majority of spills your hands will take the impact.
    Also try chatting to other riders you see, most people i meet are quite friendly and willing to share info. The ones that arent you can pretty much tell right away. Maybe youll meet some people to ride with, that usually increases the enjoyment, fun factor and motivation to keep doing it.
    It all starts somewhere, i can still remember how my descent into mountain biking began, lol. Here i am 30+ years later, bikes with more value than my cars, and still loving it!

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    Taroroot, great advice. I will be grabbing some gloves next. Ive been reading about the Giro DND as well as the Handup. I just need to find some locally to try on and get a feel for fit. This advice from all of you is very much appreciated. I will definitely move out of others way. Im looking forward to more adventures as i gain confidence.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    battery, just watched the vid on that pump. Its really nice. Im going to keep an eye out for it just in case they offer a sale or free shipping. I did try on some gloves at the shop which were Specialized and they did seem very minimal which is probably fine. i will have to try on some as suggested to see what fits or feels best. I attached a pic of the grips i have currently.

    Any multi-tool suggestions or are they all the same?

    THANKS
    Do you have a Performance Bike near you? You can find their gloves on sale every now and then. I started out with a $20 pair that was on sale. It was full fingered and did the trick for my first year and a half. I swapped them out because they were ripping and falling apart from years of use. If you don't have a Performance Bike near you, definitely check them out online for sales.

    When it comes to multi-tools, you can probably get away with what you can find. My bike has a multi-tool that came with it which attaches to my bottle cage. It's part of Specialized SWAT. You can probably buy their bottle cage/multi-tool combo and attach it to your bike.

    This is what it looks like but you may need to find the mountain bike model (or something like that):https://www.specialized.com/us/en/ze...UaAor6EALw_wcB

    If you don't want to spend that kind of cash, you can always get yourself a Camelbak Rogue bag and toss your stuff in it (or use your seat bag).
    Trek | Octane One | Transition

  14. #14
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    Oh and get rid of those damn pedals! They are slippery and good only for test rides! They also scrape on just about everything on the trail. Here, we mostly recommend the Race Face Chester pedal to new riders. They are cheap and very grippy! It's the best upgrade you can ever make! You don't see them on sale often, but they do run between $40-50. A lot of bike shops carry them in stock.

    I also recommend getting some kind of flat shoe to go with it. These pedals grip very well and will destroy your favorite shoes. Grab a set of skater shoes or do what I did...wear an old pair of Converse Chuck Taylors! You can also buy FiveTen Freerider shoes but they could set you back around $100-150. Currently, I use Specialize 2F0 flat shoes.

    Here is the pedal we recommend: https://www.amazon.com/RaceFace-Ches.../dp/B01EONZSAA
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  15. #15
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    There is a Performance about 30mins away. I will go by there the next time i am up that way and see what they have. There is also an REI not far from there. The shop threw in a Specialized bottle cage but not the one with the tool attachment, that looks nice and compact being made together. I just grabbed a Rogue off eBay this week, It has the antidote bladder but should be fine. I will check out multi tools to see what i can find. I also have a pair of the Chesters in black, i just haven't put them on yet. Thanks for the advice on the skater shoes or chuck taylors. I will definitely go that route or look for some vans somewhere. Next items to pick up with be the hand pump recommended and some gloves with a multi-tool.

  16. #16
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    Great to hear! I also recommend checking these 2 guys out. They teach a lot of skills to new riders and they have a lot of fun doing it!

    Skills with Phil:https://www.youtube.com/user/ThePhilkmetz
    Seth's Bike Hacks:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCu8...u9XfaQC74Hr_Gw

    Last but not least, I present to you Nate Hills. He is an awesome rider and motivates me to get better: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyw...b9GXD0lakYf6WA

    He also goes on some awesome biking adventures and I am very jealous!
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  17. #17
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    Will do. I’ll definitely watch those vids. Wish I could find a deal on that cage a be multi tool combo but guess I will have to find a separate multi tool to choose.

    Thanks again

  18. #18
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    I couldn't make out the pedals, are they the horrible all plastic ones? I don't know how the hell years back my buddy did trials on krapp plastic pedals, and he was pretty good too! His reasoning was they were dirt cheap/free and didn't gouge shins badly.

    I use the Giro DnD, I really like them. I tend toward minimal padding. They are pretty light so they don't last that long, but they fit me nicely. But like all clothing, its personal and people fit differently, must try on.

  19. #19
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    Yes Root, they are the generic come with your bike pedals. I have the Chesters but haven't installed them yet. I probably will before I go out again. I definitely want to take a look and try out the Giro's in person

  20. #20
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    When u go pinned pedals, beware of shin bites. They hurt like a mother! You can think of it as a badge of honor, but After your first one youll be looking for shin guards. Cheap soccer ones will work.

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    Thanks, I may take a few of the pins out and see how they do. Im thinking some vans or chucks for shoes or anything with a flat gum type sole. What multi tool is everyone using? Battery posted his tool/cage combo

  22. #22
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by Taroroot View Post
    When u go pinned pedals, beware of shin bites. They hurt like a mother! You can think of it as a badge of honor, but After your first one youll be looking for shin guards. Cheap soccer ones will work.
    Shin Guards ! I don't need no stinkin shin guards ! Are we not mountain bikers !

    You've bled with worse, now come bleed with me :P
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-img_20160530_131029_421.jpg  

    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  23. #23
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    Op, Take that bike out In the rain !
    We are mountain bikers, not pansies,
    Get filthy, get the bike filthy,
    Sand and mud removes coffee stains from your teeth ya know.
    Oh yeah the rain,, cools you off really well and If you get cold PEDAL HARDER !!

    Velominati › The Rules

    Rule #9 applies to you rookie !

    Fair-weather riding is a luxury reserved for Sunday afternoons and wide boulevards. Those who ride in foul weather – be it cold, wet, or inordinately hot – are members of a special club of riders who, on the morning of a big ride, pull back the curtain to check the weather and, upon seeing rain falling from the skies, allow a wry smile to spread across their face. This is a rider who loves the work.

    Become that crazy mofo you saw a while back, the one covered In mud and sweat,
    The one working his/her azz off and In the flow....

    Go on, you know you want to,,,, or are you a pu,,err pansie :P
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  24. #24
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    Metal or plastic pedals?
    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    Shin Guards ! I don't need no stinkin shin guards ! Are we not men !

    You've bled with worse, now come bleed with me :P
    Sent from my LGMS210 using Tapatalk
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  25. #25
    Lone Wolf
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    Actually It was a rock garden misshap,,,
    Metal pins.
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    Actually It was a rock garden misshap,,,
    Metal pins.
    Brutal! I hurt myself more when walking the bike. I was pretty beat up in Sedona but not like that. I moved from VP Vices to Chesters and its not as bad. Still have one bike with VPs.

    OP,

    Just go into Jensons or Nashbar and check their multi tools, plenty of choices and reviews. All sizes, one of mine is too heavy and bulky so now is a home tool. Gotta another one that's more compact, and lighter.

    Sent from my LGMS210 using Tapatalk
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    Thanks, I may take a few of the pins out and see how they do. Im thinking some vans or chucks for shoes or anything with a flat gum type sole. What multi tool is everyone using? Battery posted his tool/cage combo
    Don't take any pins out. Don't let a shin smack scare you from using them! I learned quickly to not smack my shin with my pedals after a couple of strikes. It's been a couple years. I am probably due for a reminder
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    Op, Take that bike out In the rain !
    We are mountain bikers, not pansies,
    Get filthy, get the bike filthy,
    Sand and mud removes coffee stains from your teeth ya know.
    Oh yeah the rain,, cools you off really well and If you get cold PEDAL HARDER !!

    Velominati › The Rules

    Rule #9 applies to you rookie !

    Fair-weather riding is a luxury reserved for Sunday afternoons and wide boulevards. Those who ride in foul weather – be it cold, wet, or inordinately hot – are members of a special club of riders who, on the morning of a big ride, pull back the curtain to check the weather and, upon seeing rain falling from the skies, allow a wry smile to spread across their face. This is a rider who loves the work.

    Become that crazy mofo you saw a while back, the one covered In mud and sweat,
    The one working his/her azz off and In the flow....

    Go on, you know you want to,,,, or are you a pu,,err pansie :P
    …and then show up for the trail work party to repair the damage you did.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  29. #29
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    These last few responses were the best ever. Osco, I plan on getting it dirty. You are right about the pins, I guess they cant be any different then the bear claw pedals I had as a kid on my BMX almost 30 years ago (42 now). I plan to take a trip to Performance Bike and REI soon as the only places near by here are Dicks and the reopened Gander Outdoors to check out multi tools and gloves. I like to see and feel things in person before ordering or buying online if I don't buy in person. All depends on the type of service I get. The 1st time I went to performance looking for a helmet, I couldn't even get a hello or is there anything we can help you with. I will give them another shot.

    I just read the full list of rules, funniest list ever but also helpful in not looking like a moran out there. Didn't know it wasn't acceptable to mount a handpump on the bike. I was looking at the Klic HV pump by Crank Brothers.

  30. #30
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Remember what chazpat said, post#28,,

    Clay based trails should be avoided when wet, you will cut ruts that harden up like concrete when they dry.
    You can get a good workout and rain ride on the two tracks and the green trails.

    And you can mount your hand pump anywhere you like :P

    Very Important tip for you:
    Don't over clean your bike, using a spray nozzle will push sand right through fork and bearing seals.
    When I ride in mud or wet stuff I wash the bike,
    When I ride in dry and dusty conditions I just do chain maintenance.

    I run a teflon coated chain so I use very little lube.
    Remember to wipe your chain down and lube It right after a ride, IF It needs the lube but try and run as dry as you can, the only lube that matters is what gets inside the rollers..
    A few days later when you ride wipe It down hard and that's it..

    FWIW that thick sticky stuff that comes on new bike chains,,I think Its to fight rust while the bike crosses the ocean, I dunno but Its a dirt magnet.

    I do what ever It takes to remove ALL of that ASAP!!!

    Bbbuuutttt you can Ingnore your chain, let It wear out faster and you get to say those magic words, we all love to say, " Aww Honey My gears have worn out and I could get hurt If I don't replace them fast"
    "I'll get better log lasting ones I swear"
    This is the path to upgrades and enlightenment ~
    :~D
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    Remember what chazpat said, post#28,,

    Clay based trails should be avoided when wet, you will cut ruts that harden up like concrete when they dry.
    You can get a good workout and rain ride on the two tracks and the green trails.

    And you can mount your hand pump anywhere you like :P

    Very Important tip for you:
    Don't over clean your bike, using a spray nozzle will push sand right through fork and bearing seals.
    When I ride in mud or wet stuff I wash the bike,
    When I ride in dry and dusty conditions I just do chain maintenance.

    I run a teflon coated chain so I use very little lube.
    Remember to wipe your chain down and lube It right after a ride, IF It needs the lube but try and run as dry as you can, the only lube that matters is what gets inside the rollers..
    A few days later when you ride wipe It down hard and that's it..
    Thanks, the cleaning is also something I have been reading about as I see where water can force dirt and grit into unwanted places. I mainly took a damp towel and wiped it down after my ride Monday. I'm anal about cleaning stuff afterwards so if it gets really muddy or dirty, will definitely have to watch Seth's vid on a good bike wash again. I did see some big ruts on the trail which I actually tried to avoid versus making them deeper. I figured they came from all the rain we have had recently.

  32. #32
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    When you look at pedals look at the pins. There are different types. For different terrains and speeds.
    Some can cut you up much more than others.
    Long skinny sharp pins- you can wear shin guards with your other armour for DH. Or if you have a long travel bike to stay seated through rocks.
    For lower speeds and trail riding shorter rounded pins and stubby pins work and won't cut you up as much.
    You can use your regular running shoes with open tread with those too.

    Wellgo B143 with stubby pins-

    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-wellgo%2520b143%2520%25202.jpg

    Origin8 with short rounded pins
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Origin8-Ult...-/222933394714

    These work if you get off your seat or drop it and keep your heels down when going through rocks.

  33. #33
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    I have the RaceFace Chesters I am going to be throwing on soon. I found them onsale for 39 at REI a few weeks ago. Im also looking at the Crank Brothers M-19 Multi-tool. Any experience with that model or is it overkill and should I go with the M-17? Its actually cheaper than the 17 and comes with a small canister carry case

  34. #34
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    Eh, multi-tools are rarely considered as overkill. You should be fine with whatever you find. As for mounting pumps on your bike, yep. Some people do it! Be cautious carrying a pump in your bag. There was a rider who was paralyzed years ago because he got into a wreck and his shock pump (was in his bag) actually busted up his vertebrae.

    Granted, the Crank Brothers pump is smaller than a shock pump, but there is still the possibility of it injuring your back. It doesn't happen often though. This wreck may have been 1 in a 1,000 chance of happening. I actually mounted my Crank Brothers Klic pump on the side of my Camelbak Rogue bag. I used one of the small straps and routed it through the clip and tucked the pump into the side pouch.

    If you don't plan on using a bottle cage, definitely mount the pump on the bottle cage bolts!

    Here is the article of the dude who was paralyzed:https://www.bicycling.com/training/a...ve-your-spine/
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    Thanks battery, I have the 2 sets of mounting points for a cage and one is in use. I think I could mount it to the location directly under the seat where the post goes into. (don't know the correct name for each tube yet) I think having it on my bike for now will be good until I start using a camelbak for longer rides.

    Crazy luck on that accident. I guess anything can happen anywhere.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    Thanks battery, I have the 2 sets of mounting points for a cage and one is in use. I think I could mount it to the location directly under the seat where the post goes into. (don't know the correct name for each tube yet) I think having it on my bike, for now, will be good until I start using a Camelbak for longer rides.

    Crazy luck on that accident. I guess anything can happen anywhere.
    This is what it looks like attached to my Tricross! It does stick out a little bit but it doesn't affect my pedaling. I attached it to my seat post downtube similar to what you are going to do.

    I don't know why the website turn the image sideways

    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-img_0416.jpg
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    Thanks for the pic, I have been trying to see how the bracket was made and it is snaps to it or used Velcro as the website didn't have an pics. Thanks again.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    If you don't plan on using a bottle cage, definitely mount the pump on the bottle cage bolts!
    Most pumps that mount on the bottle cage bolts allow you to mount a cage too. It's a good place to stow them IMO.
    I brake for stinkbugs

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    Thanks J.B. Weld (cool name, takes me back to helping my dad work on stuff-- hand me that JB WELD tube) I appreciate ALLLL the replies and suggestions.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    Thanks for the pic, I have been trying to see how the bracket was made and it is snaps to it or used Velcro as the website didn't have an pics. Thanks again.
    You use the bolts to mount it to the frame. The velcro holds the lightsaber to the bracket.


    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Most pumps that mount on the bottle cage bolts allow you to mount a cage too. It's a good place to stow them IMO.
    I thought that too, but I never tried it. From what I can tell, you place the pump bracket against the bike frame and stack the bottle cage on top? I wonder if the bolts would be long enough to attach both? I will give it a shot for the fun of it. I have to take the cages off my Tricross anyways.
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    I thought that too, but I never tried it. From what I can tell, you place the pump bracket against the bike frame and stack the bottle cage on top? I wonder if the bolts would be long enough to attach both?
    Yes, most of the pumps with brackets come with longer bolts.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  42. #42
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    OP: are you sure that's not an air fork? there might be some settings besides air pressure...

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElwoodT View Post
    OP: are you sure that's not an air fork? there might be some settings besides air pressure...
    Longer screws would be a good option to put them in one place. Thanks for the clarification on the velcros a rubberstap.

    I don't think its an air-fork unfortunately. I would have to look at specs again. Its the 2018 Specialized Pitch Expert. This is off the Speci site so it looks to be coil

    •Custom SR Suntour 27.5 fork features our Multi-Circuit Damping technology to eliminate any "pogo" effect by delivering 80/100mm (size-specific) of hydraulic damped suspension and rebound that smooths out rough terrain.

    SR Suntour XCR 32 27.5, coil spring, custom Multi-Circuit damping, 80/100mm travel

  44. #44
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    Yeah, it's an entry level bike. I rode a Rockhopper Sport on the trail as my first bike. Entry level bikes aren't always optimal for most trails, but they are still a ton of fun! I learned a lot about myself and my riding style starting out on an entry level bike. Also, entry level bikes become a standard for comparison on any future bikes you buy.
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    Battery, exactly right. I think its a good starting point plus it retailed for $800 and I got it for $400 so I didn't feel like I could pass up on the deal to start out with. It was a better model than the lower end Pitch's and still under the price with only one ride on it. It still had the reflectors on it when I picked it up. The owner had bought it for his wife but once she realized it was a mans bike, she couldn't ride it anymore. I think for $200 plus labor, I could upgrade the fork to an Air Fork and still have less than 700 tied up in the bike but i'll use the coil until I can understand and feel the difference with growth. I'll ride it like it is until my abilities catch up with the bikes limitations and then decide if I go for a better bike or make upgrades to this one past the fork.

    I did run out on lunch and drop into the local Gander Outdoors where I saw the Giro DND gloves and tried on a set. they fit pretty good but all they had were black. At least I know what size I need in those to order in another color if I don't find others to try on at other locations.

  46. #46
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    I have both set ups, I also prefer my pumps on my frames.

    Sorry for the blury pix.

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    Thanks JCD46. That's the route I will be going. I also saw the Topeak pump at Gander but it seemed a little bulky. I forget the model they had but I am pretty impressed with the Klic HV from the link Battery posted after watching the video.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    I have both set ups, I also prefer my pumps on my frames.

    Sent from my LGMS210 using Tapatalk
    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-17ddnc.jpg
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  49. #49
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    Lol

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    Lol
    Yeah he is one persistent old man..

    https://youtu.be/PvxIxXHLL_0


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  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    Lol
    You will get used to it. JCD and I bomb threads poking fun at each other about Herbert!
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  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    You will get used to it. JCD and I bomb threads poking fun at each other about Herbert!
    Its a silent and friendly battle.

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    I run the One up components EDC in the 70cc pump mounted to under downtube bottle cate bolts. Expensive, but slick. Ive verified all but the chain tool function. Oh and CO2 inflater, havent tried that yet, i have no doubt it works but i dont carry a CO2 usually and the 70cc is too small to carry cartridge.

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    Battery. I started watching the YouTube link and died laughing.

    Tarotoot, any pics of your Setup or links to that

  55. #55
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    Hey Nigel, watch Biking with Bobo too! He rides with Seth every now and then. He is too hilarious with his content!

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  56. #56
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    Ok, BoBo is a fool and im sure he has stock in bandaids

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    Ok, BoBo is a fool and im sure he has stock in bandaids
    He isn't a super experienced rider like most other YouTubers. Because of that, he is relatable to many people. I do love this guy though. He makes me laugh!
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  58. #58
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    I watched several of his vids and he is a true every day rider. Makes the beginner like me feel confident

  59. #59
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    I have the RaceFace Chesters I am going to be throwing on soon. I found them onsale for 39 at REI a few weeks ago. Im also looking at the Crank Brothers M-19 Multi-tool. Any experience with that model or is it overkill and should I go with the M-17? Its actually cheaper than the 17 and comes with a small canister carry case
    Been on the same Race Face Affect pedals for two years, they are still like new.

    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-2014-race-face-aeffect-flat-pedal03-600x232.jpg
    The Pins have not bled me In a long time, I found that If I am on one pedal I can find the other one, but If I come off both things get dicey.

    Wanted to move to the Chester's to save a few grams,
    The Affects back in the day were $100
    The Chester's I saw were $50

    Used to clip in but decided I liked the freedom of flats more..
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  60. #60
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    Bobo,,LoL Great Video and right on the mark :P
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    Bobo,,LoL Great Video and right on the mark :P
    Just one more run, Osco?
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    Osco, I caught them on sale at REI during memorial day. i expect they will run that sale again. I plan on catching some gloves and hand pump during the 4th of July sale if I'm lucky or at least get free shipping from somewhere that carried that CB Klic HV. I don't see me going lipless anytime soon. Im looking for a good flat bottom tennis shoe to ride in so i don't mess up my good shoes as suggested. I may go with a Chuck taylor or something leather that will wash off mud and dirt. I don't see myself getting 510 or a specialty shoe so some good sneakers will do so i can have multiple usage if I'm walking the park as well

  63. #63
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    Watch for deals on skater shoes. They sell them everywhere!

    Not sure what size your foot is, but these are on sale. Just use the Euro to US shoe conversion chart.
    Shimano SH-AM5 Mountain Shoes | Jenson USA
    Shimano SH-AM9 Mountain Shoes | Jenson USA

    There are some shoes that can work as dual purpose (clipless or flats). I had a pair of Shimano MT-34 shoes that worked as dual purpose. I pulled the cover off and I converted them to clipless. These shoes I listed could potentially work as dual purpose even without a cover that goes over the clipless part of the shoe.
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  64. #64
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    Battery, I wil def look for some deals on the skater shoe, maybe some vans?

  65. #65
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    Im looking for a good flat bottom tennis shoe to ride in so i don't mess up my good shoes as suggested.
    Here Is where I must disagree with you, good pedals and proper shoes are an absolute must !
    The shoes you speak of will flex and over time are not doing your feet any good.
    If you do go that route try for some of the newer larger platform pedals, they will spread the weight out some.

    Can't count the times my Specialized 2FO's strong toe box kept me from folding back a toe nail or worse.
    When I'm mashing out a hard climb the more rigid shoe deck saves me from accumulated pain that I believe would do damage to my feet, my arch and my ankle over time.

    Casual green or double track trail rides, fine, but be warned, the first time you smack a stump, rock or other obstacle with your foot at 6,10, 15 MPH or more you better be in a good mtb bike shoe.
    As for clipping In, when you get the extra money I suggest you do this,
    I ride flats but still clip in for a dozen rides or so each summer.
    Riding both will make you a far better pedaler :P

    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-p8120058.jpgGoing for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-specialized-2fo-shoes-slip-not2-1024x682.jpg
    I got a second pair of these for clipping in, I wore the flats pair to work for six months, spending much of my time on my feet on asphalt.
    They are extremely comfortable and have the correct amount of flex.
    The bottom Is some tire rubber compound,
    These hose out and dry over night, they flush water out fast and completely on the trails and never stink at all...
    Have been redesigned I think.
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

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    Osco,Thank you for that info. Never really thought about the hitting a stump or other stuff. Those are a good looking shoe. I will certainly look at some better shoes. I will have to look for those in a store and try some on. THANKS for that suggestion and for leaving the model number so i can look for them. I did look at different shoes the other day but those look really good. I also went to Performance Bike yesterday to try on gloves but i have never gotten any help from the staff at our local one. They had some house brand gloves called Performance Bandits that looked good for $19 but i think I'm going to hold out for the Giro DnD's.

  67. #67
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    I love my 2FO's! They are spendy but worth the price. You can actually walk around town with them on after a bike ride. I love the shoelace holder in the middle of the tongue.

    Most Specialized dealers carry these shoes alongside their bikes.

    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-img_0288.jpg
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  68. #68
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    Definitely agree that a shoe with some toe protection is important, and having at least some stiffness in the sole is also important. Too flexible and your feet will take a beating. I clip the outside edge of my foot on crap all the time. No matter what pedals/shoes.

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    THanks Battery and Harold. Both those shoes look good. Visiting my parents this weekend so I decide to check out a small bike shop that hadn’t been open long here. Guy was extremely nice and friendly so I ended up picking up a pair of gloves from him for $19.00. I think they will be a good starting glove plus it didn’t hurt to support a small shop. He sold Cannondale mainly. The gloves felt good, wasn’t quite as bulky on my hand as the DND’s and he came out and talked to me even though he was working on a bike. Something no one did at Performance Bike yesterday.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-64268775-d2c3-4907-ba6e-8e083b9b27fd.jpg  


  70. #70
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    Those look like comfortable gloves!
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  71. #71
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    So… when is the OP going for his 2nd ride (weather permitting)? Or will that be a new thread?
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

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    LMAO. I’m planning on this coming Friday since I will be off. I think the gloves felt really good. He had another pair that was a little more pricey but he said these were better and breathed better as well. The store was Bicycle Medic in danville Va. I think I should be able to find the pump and multitool during 4th of July sales online. Her eyes is a vid i found of the intermediate trail at tanglewood

    https://youtu.be/PF_ULAVNGWI

  73. #73
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    Try to not plan your rides like a space shuttle launch. Just go out there after work and go crazy for an hour!
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  74. #74
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    That's how I have to roll, find a gap..head out the door and ride!

    Todays quickie!

    https://www.relive.cc/view/1643216430
    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    Try to not plan your rides like a space shuttle launch. Just go out there after work and go crazy for an hour!
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  75. #75
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    True. Good point Battrry. 7miles. That was a good ride jcd46

  76. #76
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    If any of you guys want to follow me on Strava, here I am: https://www.strava.com/athletes/21726443

    I like sharing my adventures with other people!

    Nigel, if you want to track your effort and personal goals, you should give Strava a try. It's free! Just don't get sucked into beating other people's lap times and you are ok. I use it to track miles on my bikes and analyze my personal output to see if I am improving.
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  77. #77
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    Yeah Strava Is a great aid/tool If your realistic about It.

    I worked on a specific black diamond single track for six months, when I started It took me 34 minutes to complete, and after much blood sweat and tears I could do It In 19 minutes.
    The KOM does It In three lap sets,, 6 minutes 14 seconds each lap.
    People would fly In from very far away just to race this guy and beat his KOM's

    One thing Strava did for me, I followed that KOM rider, and found his training routes,
    They were brutal to me but made me a far better rider.

    KOM, king of the mountain :P
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

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    Battery and Osco I was seriously researching how to track mileage late lastnight. This is perfect cause I wasn’t sure about adding a computer to the bike with the extra cable to count revolutions. I will read up on strava and old it. Also I think I’m ordering the Klic HV with gauge, found it for $33 shipped. I’m guessing the extra size of the internal gauge is not that big of a deal.
    Happy Father’s Day to all of you as well. If your not dads im sure you have helped a child somewhere sometime.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    Battery and Osco I was seriously researching how to track mileage late lastnight. This is perfect cause I wasn’t sure about adding a computer to the bike with the extra cable to count revolutions. I will read up on strava and old it. Also I think I’m ordering the Klic HV with gauge, found it for $33 shipped. I’m guessing the extra size of the internal gauge is not that big of a deal.
    Happy Father’s Day to all of you as well. If your not dads im sure you have helped a child somewhere sometime.
    Yep, just hit the record button on your Strava app and toss it into your bag.
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  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    Battery and Osco I was seriously researching how to track mileage late lastnight. This is perfect cause I wasn’t sure about adding a computer to the bike with the extra cable to count revolutions. I will read up on strava and old it.
    If you have a smart phone you can try it out today. There are other free apps (e.g. trailforks) that will track mileage, elevation, etc. without the segments and leaderboards but Strava is kind of fun and shows your progress, and as a beginner you'll be seeing lots of that.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  81. #81
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    Thanks For the info JB

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    Just came back from my 2nd ride at Tanglewood park In NC. The pedals made a huge difference along with the padded shorts. I tried a different trail this time which was a lot more twisty with some small bridges going over creeks and some logs with a few small jumps. I think i clocked a couple of miles on that one as i forgot to turn on strava for that ride. I went back to the trail head and took a break for a while and then started the same trail from my first ride and that will be the one i use to hone my skills before jumping on the other trail again. I did turn on Strav for that one and it shows i clocked 3.6 miles which isn't a lot but it was a good run for me as I'm ready to go back. Met a couple of guys out there that was really nice and cool, one who had just moved out from the West Coast and said he had ridden all over the country. He had a nice Santa Cruz FS and the 3 other beginners who were just starting out as well to see if they liked it. I expect i will be seeing all of them again out there. Took a couple of photos but i think i have found something that i will grow with. Not sure why all my pics turn once i upload
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-cb5ea039-f56c-4e06-af66-f898f5b43fe2.jpg  

    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-6c9db988-3942-43aa-9eb7-9658f388ec2d.jpg  

    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-557a24cd-5af1-4c5f-8931-1471beae80ef.jpg  


  83. #83
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    Congrats! Glad you had fun!

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  84. #84
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    Looking good! Don't stress how many miles you blaze on the trails. What's important is the experience you gain over those 3.6 miles. Going at your own pace will net you way more experience than piling on a ton of miles. I would definitely use Strava to watch your personal growth. You will be amazed by your own personal progression.

    When I first started out at my local bike park, I average about 4.5mph (according to Strava). One year later, I started pushing 8-9mph at the same bike park which includes clearing a quarter mile technical trail, the main XC trail, and blasting down a couple freeride trails. Every bike park will have different numbers due to the trails that they offer so my comparative numbers were for the main bike park that I rode frequently.

    Now, I am trying something else out. I sold my mountain bike and picked up my road bike. I am pushing my endurance levels up higher and I plan to buy an XC bike next summer. I hope to progress more and get into our local XC racing league.
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    Sold the MTB, is the legal? Gotta push yourself, thats one thing i believe this sport is going to make me do. I did mount the pump also. It was almost too long but i think that may be because it has the gauge built into it but it didn't budge any while riding or get in my way any. Strava seemed cool since it showed exactly where i was riding, i just need to make sure i remember to hit start each time.

    jcd46, it was fun and the guys i ran into all seemed pretty cool.

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    I sold my mountain bike and picked up my road bike.
    You don't seem to understand how n+1 works!

    Nigel, just try to improve a bit on each ride. If you stopped midway on a trail to take a break, try to go a little further past there before stopping next time you ride the trail. But if you don't make it, or even need to stop earlier, don't sweat it. Just make it a goal to work towards, sometimes you're tired from lack of sleep or yard work or that pizza hasn't digested so well. Same thing when climbing a hill or getting through a technical area, just make it a goal to improve.

    btw, I mix mtb and road. My current accumulative for the year for the road is only 2-1/2 miles more for road than mtb. Road tends to be longer distances but I mtb more often.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    You don't seem to understand how n+1 works!

    Nigel, just try to improve a bit on each ride. If you stopped midway on a trail to take a break, try to go a little further past there before stopping next time you ride the trail. But if you don't make it, or even need to stop earlier, don't sweat it. Just make it a goal to work towards, sometimes you're tired from lack of sleep or yard work or that pizza hasn't digested so well. Same thing when climbing a hill or getting through a technical area, just make it a goal to improve.

    btw, I mix mtb and road. My current accumulative for the year for the road is only 2-1/2 miles more for road than mtb. Road tends to be longer distances but I mtb more often.
    Great advice. I would take a breather on the trail and then go a little further each time. Im trying to find a full map of the trail to see how far it goes so i can have some landmarks or focal points of reference in case i get turned around. I haven't been as thirsty on the rides as i thought i would be so i may opt for a smaller water bottle on the bike.

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    You don't seem to understand how n+1 works!
    Wife says otherwise lol

    I have to get in shape and burn off some body fat and I wasn't getting it done with mountain biking. Most of my health issues are floating around my weight (279lbs) and something happened to me 3 weeks ago that pushed me to lose weight. I watched a video playback of my 10 minute college presentation (for my honors program) and I saw how big I truly was and I didn't like it. I had to make changes or else I will feel like crap the rest of my life.

    Currently, I am road cycling way more than I ever mountain biked. In fact, I hit my yearly mountain biking average miles in just 2 weeks on my road bike. I absolutely love riding distance. After about 3-4 weeks of cycling, I can feel major differences in my stomach and love handles so I am on the right track!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    Wife says otherwise lol

    I have to get in shape and burn off some body fat and I wasn't getting it done with mountain biking. Most of my health issues are floating around my weight (279lbs) and something happened to me 3 weeks ago that pushed me to lose weight. I watched a video playback of my 10 minute college presentation (for my honors program) and I saw how big I truly was and I didn't like it. I had to make changes or else I will feel like crap the rest of my life.

    Currently, I am road cycling way more than I ever mountain biked. In fact, I hit my yearly mountain biking average miles in just 2 weeks on my road bike. I absolutely love riding distance. After about 3-4 weeks of cycling, I can feel major differences in my stomach and love handles so I am on the right track!
    Ah, you're working with the n-1 formula (where n is the number of bikes at which your wife will divorce you). I wasn't sure if I was on that formula as well but after awhile, I think my wife gave up on the idea of me not buying more bikes.

    Good luck with the weight loss. I think frequency of exercise is key, really need to try to hit five days a week if you can. I'm also a trail runner and it was when I got into that along with my bike riding once or twice a week that I lost weight.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

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    THats great Battery. Good luck on the weight loss and progress. Constant exercise is key. Diet or eating right is hard but nothing tops burning calories and having fun at the same time. Keep us posted on your progress

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    FORgot to mention that from my ride I did notice twice that the chain jumped from the middle gear to the lower in the front twice after some rooty areas and some rough terrain without me shifting any. The shifter still read 2 but it had dropped to the smaller gear. I took it in today for it’s time up and to check the cables at my LBS and the tech adjusted the rear derailleur and said there was a little cable stretch which would have caused that. I get free tune ups for a year as things break in and need tweaking. A 2X or 1X probably would have been nice or prevented that but I guess it also depends on the initial build and needed adjustments after some rides. Doing some quick gear shifts on ththe stand and around the parking lot, it seemed fine but I think I’ll really find out on a trail if it’s cured.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    THats great Battery. Good luck on the weight loss and progress. Constant exercise is key. Diet or eating right is hard but nothing tops burning calories and having fun at the same time. Keep us posted on your progress
    Thanks man! This might sound funny but most people think I look like a NFL football lineman rather than an overweight guy. I honestly don't know why people keep asking me if I play for the damn Seahawks. I must look like someone.

    Do you have your Strava up and running? A few posts back, I listed my Strava account. Feel free to add me and follow along with my adventures. I also have a thread running in the Clydesdale section too. I try to update that at least once a month. Now that I am making progress, I feel like I have something interesting to share with other people now lol!
    Trek | Octane One | Transition

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    Yep, I set it up sunday. I will take a look at that post and add you. I need to sit down and get familiar with the app. Take the lineman remark as a compliment. Worst case scenario, they think you are someone else and comp you some meals or drinks. IF you hit a plato on your gains, don't let that frustrate you. You may have to change your routine up a little once your body figures out and stops responding or dropping weight for a little while.

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    Sell your bike? Blasphemy! In my life ive sold two of my bikes, to good causes. One was a cute coworker, the other was my mod trials that saw way more use by new owner. Ive given away a couple to friends also for good causes. Broken one and bashed another so much decided to retire it. Dont think id be ever without a MTB, i am prob going to pick up a cross bike soon tho. Can retire my museum piece that i use for road.

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    I don't know for certain why I am looking except to see if the possibility is there but I did notice some people with my same bike changed it over to a 1X after some time. Is this something worth doing later and what would the cost be roughly? When I searched for it, I found a thread on another forum with some pics and info on parts so I snagged it to refer back to. I searched for his user name on here but didn't find him. It will be a ways down the road before I do change it out unless I notice issues with the chain jumping. But just to do the 1x change, any thoughts on prices. I will wait until my fork is dead before changing that since everything is pretty much new with less that 4hrs on it.

    Below is the parts list posted

    Rockshox Yari 160mm
    -Hope Pro 4 hub
    -Stans Crest Wheel
    -Cane Creek Headset

    I am working on the rear now to include:
    -Hope Pro 4 hub
    -Stans Crest Wheel
    -1X Drivetrain Shimano SLX
    -Race Face AEffect Cranks
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-ptich-1x.jpg  

    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-pitch-1x-rear.jpg  

    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-pitch-slx.jpg  

    Going for 1st ride tomorrow, weather permitting-pitch-raceface.jpg  


  96. #96
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    Stay away from it bro. Wait and get a better bike later. It's all about the frame geometry! Once you find your riding style (casual, XC racer, trail blazer, etc) then you will know what you want to do. By looking at your parts list, I am betting that you want a trail bike like a Specialized Stumpjumper or equivilant.

    If you are itching to upgrade something on your current bike, consider a dropper post and maybe a stem that will help you with your reach. I don't know what the stock stem length is on that bike, but you can always experiment with a shorter stem to see how it feels. Typically, a shorter stem (35-40mm) will have twitchy/sensitive steering which may be good for some riders. Longer stems such as 100mm will give a rider a little more predictability in steering and they are typically found on XC bikes (and road bikes). You will want to find your sweet spot which is somehwere in between. My old stem on my Stumpy was 70mm and I swapped to a 60mm and it was a good balance point for me. I tried a 45mm stem on a Specialized Enduro and while I did enjoy the responsive steering, it wasn't for me.

    I recommend a Truvativ Hussefelt stem. Why? They are $20-30 and you can try a different stem length without busting the budget. The Hussefelt stems are mostly for downhill/freeride bikes, but they are cheap enough to where you can give them a whirl without worrying about losing a ton of money.

    Shopping for a dropper post can be hit and miss. Some shops like Jenson USA have them on sale while others don't. For instance, I bought a KS Dropzone worth $250 and I scored it for 50 percent off because it didn't have the original box. Some deals are out there! Just gotta watch for them!

    You will want to find a dropper with a remote and most likely external routing. External routed dropper posts are much cheaper than internal routed. Your bike may not be able to support an internally routed post anyways. The typical dropper post you will find for sale will have 125mm of drop.

    Before you hunt down a dropper post, make sure you find the length of your seat tube. You don't want to get a dropper that is too long! You might be able to take a measurement of your current seatpost and find a dropper that is close to that measurement too. Next, you need to find out the diameter of your seatpost. Most of the time, it's stamped on the post. You will want to buy one with the same diameter.
    Trek | Octane One | Transition

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    Thank for the info. I agree and don't think I need to do any upgrades now unless its an air fork later but I don't know enough now to even know how the difference on that will feel. I do currently have internal cabling but I don't know how that works with adding a dropper. I think i'll just ride the crap out of it and fit what breaks in time or use that as a reason to upgrade. the reach feels fine currently but like you said, I think all that will come with knowledge and experience to determine what I may need later. I was thinking that if I got rid of some of the extra moving parts, it may give me less headache later.

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    1x conversion is free. Just take off your front shifter, derailleur and extra ring(s).

    Okay, maybe not completely free; you might need some shorter chainring bolts and collars. Should be under $10.

    If you want to do a narrow wide ring, which isn't a bad idea, that's ~$30
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    1x conversion is free. Just take off your front shifter, derailleur and extra ring(s).

    Okay, maybe not completely free; you might need some shorter chainring bolts and collars. Should be under $10.

    If you want to do a narrow wide ring, which isn't a bad idea, that's ~$30
    That doesn't sound bad at all if its that simple. If its something to be done for under $100 bucks when time comes, may be worth it if something breaks. Think maybe I will just practice and look for a low budget action camera to play with for now. Thanks for the info

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by NigelMTB View Post
    Thank for the info. I agree and don't think I need to do any upgrades now unless its an air fork later but I don't know enough now to even know how the difference on that will feel. I do currently have internal cabling but I don't know how that works with adding a dropper. I think i'll just ride the crap out of it and fit what breaks in time or use that as a reason to upgrade. the reach feels fine currently but like you said, I think all that will come with knowledge and experience to determine what I may need later. I was thinking that if I got rid of some of the extra moving parts, it may give me less headache later.
    Just go external routing. It’s so much simpler and quicker to remove if needed. Seeing this is your first bike, external just makes it cheaper for you to try it out.
    Trek | Octane One | Transition

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