Giant or Gary fisher?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    11

    Giant or Gary fisher?

    I am trying to decide between a 2003, GIANT warp DS 1, and a Gary Fisher Joshua X frame. The Joshua X im not sure how old it is, but im sure not older than 5 years. Anyway, i was wondering if anyone could give me a little advice, thanks.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by theflash2000
    I am trying to decide between a 2003, GIANT warp DS 1, and a Gary Fisher Joshua X frame. The Joshua X im not sure how old it is, but im sure not older than 5 years. Anyway, i was wondering if anyone could give me a little advice, thanks.
    They are both old, inefficient full suspension designs. What I mean by that is, you will encounter a lot of pedal "bob", meaning a lot of bouncing from the rear end generated from pedaling. You can get a brand new Giant hard tail fairly well equpped for a descent price, have you considered that?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    11

    well, im not sure

    I actually don't know. I want a big that climbs really well, and descends with good shock absorption. Climbing is important though, im big on the climb. So if you could recommend a bike that climbs well and at the same time has either a good front shock or both front and back, that would be good, but whatever is the best, i think that would be the way for me to go, thanks.

  4. #4
    Peace & Love
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,282
    Quote Originally Posted by theflash2000
    I am trying to decide between a 2003, GIANT warp DS 1, and a Gary Fisher Joshua X frame. The Joshua X im not sure how old it is, but im sure not older than 5 years. Anyway, i was wondering if anyone could give me a little advice, thanks.
    what is your budget? do you want a full suspension or are you open to a hardtail? depending on your budget, I/we can make some good recommendations. Of course it is always optimal to buy from a local bike shop so you can get fitted but I have yet to ever buy from the local bike shop since none carry the frames I have had or they at least never have the frames built up. Anyway, if you are open to mail order and are quite sure about the size, let us know.

    cheers

  5. #5
    Freshly Fujified
    Reputation: Call_me_Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    8,199

    Spend more money

    I doubt you are going to get a full suspension rig that does what you're expecting for the money you're looking to spend on the two bikes you mentioned. I had a Warp, and it was a very good bike, but it does not climb well. It's kind of heavy, and you would need to put a new rear shock with some sort of platform pedal damping to reduce the bob on hills. A hardtail would climb much better, but you won't have the suspension you're looking for on the downhills. In my opinion, you're going to need to spend between $1000 and $1300 to find an '04 leftover full suspension rig that will climb well, and do will in descents.

    I hope this helps.

    Clyde
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    11

    not too sure yet

    ok, lets back up. here's a little background. i was born on a bike, almost literally. i learned to ride on two wheels by the time i was 3. im not bragging, i have just ridden and loved to ride all my life. i grew up mostly cruising. kind of equivalent to cyclocross. we would road bike for hundreds of miles, but on a cruiser/cyclocross type. i had a fuji blvd. xc. the model was like from 1980 or earlier. anyway, i still have it, still love it and will still ride it with my wife and kids. I grew into the road bike, and still love it. I own the 2001 usps team trek bike. I have ridden in the mountains of utah growing up and i love the trails - uphill and down. my fuji has taken a good beating and is still alive (minus the rear deraileur and some upgraded things).
    But my whole life, i don't know what it is, but i love to climb. i really want a climbing bike, and a way to enjoy the ride back down. i am open to a hardtail, a full suspension, whatever, i just need some advice to get started.
    I ride a 54-56cm road bike. I am 5'10", 155 lbs., and my fuji xc is about 21 inches. I have never test ridden or gotten on any current bikes at the local bike shop, but i hope some of this info. helps. I also was hoping (i know this is not the best route) to build a bike. i am also open to advice on this decision as well, but that's what i have in mind, thanks to all who take the time to read this and respond.

  7. #7
    Peace & Love
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,282
    Quote Originally Posted by theflash2000
    ok, lets back up. here's a little background. i was born on a bike, almost literally. i learned to ride on two wheels by the time i was 3. im not bragging, i have just ridden and loved to ride all my life. i grew up mostly cruising. kind of equivalent to cyclocross. we would road bike for hundreds of miles, but on a cruiser/cyclocross type. i had a fuji blvd. xc. the model was like from 1980 or earlier. anyway, i still have it, still love it and will still ride it with my wife and kids. I grew into the road bike, and still love it. I own the 2001 usps team trek bike. I have ridden in the mountains of utah growing up and i love the trails - uphill and down. my fuji has taken a good beating and is still alive (minus the rear deraileur and some upgraded things).
    But my whole life, i don't know what it is, but i love to climb. i really want a climbing bike, and a way to enjoy the ride back down. i am open to a hardtail, a full suspension, whatever, i just need some advice to get started.
    I ride a 54-56cm road bike. I am 5'10", 155 lbs., and my fuji xc is about 21 inches. I have never test ridden or gotten on any current bikes at the local bike shop, but i hope some of this info. helps. I also was hoping (i know this is not the best route) to build a bike. i am also open to advice on this decision as well, but that's what i have in mind, thanks to all who take the time to read this and respond.
    fair enough.....I love to climb more than I do descending...I guess I too like pain and the accomplishment that comes with clearing a sweet hill, and I get the most satisfaction from clearing steep technical sections that people have to walk up.....there is nothing like it.

    still, it is hard to help without knowing what price range you are looking at; that is the key driver at the end of the day. both of my mountain bikes were built part by part so I tend to not buy bikes off the shelf. In fact, I just bought my first off the shelf bike last week, but it was a road bike. For me, I will never buy an off the shelf bike because it is just too darn fun to pick each part. Having said that, there are some phenomenal deals to be had in virtually all price ranges so let us know and we can be of more help, otherwise I may simply pick a bike that has a frame that costs more than you are willing to spend on the whole bike.

    cheers

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    11

    I apologize

    I am sorry for not including a price range in my last post. You figure i wrote enough, i ought to have at least answered your question about price range....Anyway. I intend to spend, well TRY to spend 500 or less for just the frame. If this is reasonable for a good solid bike, then fine. If it can't happen, well then i guess i may just have to do a reality check, thanks.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    11

    can't get this right....

    well, i seem to be goofing up a lot here. I also meant to say that if we can find a good used, or older frame that was a top performer for that year, then that would be even better, knocking a price down significantly.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by theflash2000
    well, i seem to be goofing up a lot here. I also meant to say that if we can find a good used, or older frame that was a top performer for that year, then that would be even better, knocking a price down significantly.
    Unless you have the money, I wouldn't be building a bike. As, FoShizzle said it's fun to pick and choose the compoents, but you pay a premium for doing that.

    If you just looking for just a frame then used would be the only way to go (at least in you're price range). Most company only sell framesets for their high end lines. Like Specialized only does framesets for their S-Work line. You're not going to find like new HardRock frame for sale.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    11

    here's the plan

    well here is what i want to do: I suck at saving my money, but a 2 or 3 thousand dollar bike is not out of the question. I just have to buy parts slowly to get there because i can't save my money worth crap. Also, if i do save my money i would probably find something else to spend my money on, not that the mountain bike isn't the priority right now, but im a young guy with a wife and kids, so a top of the line mountain bike is just harder.

  12. #12
    Peace & Love
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,282
    Quote Originally Posted by wraith
    Unless you have the money, I wouldn't be building a bike. As, FoShizzle said it's fun to pick and choose the compoents, but you pay a premium for doing that.

    If you just looking for just a frame then used would be the only way to go (at least in you're price range). Most company only sell framesets for their high end lines. Like Specialized only does framesets for their S-Work line. You're not going to find like new HardRock frame for sale.
    I agree that in general, you will pay a premium but that has not been the case for me. Only because I had so much time to do it (since I had another bike) I was able to get great deals cause I would just look out for deals on 1 or 2 parts a month. I saved A LOT of money and got a much higher end bike than I would have otherwise for that same amount. But you have to know where to luck and be patient to do it that way.

    As far as starting from a frame, there are some good frames about $500 that you can find, even new. But I would still recommend stating a price you are willing to pay for a complete bike because as wraith says, it may not be cost efficient to build it part by part unless you really know where to look and at this point, a complete bike may make much, much more sense, especially since there are some great deals on some great bikes to be had in terms of 2004 closeouts.

    Having said that, if you need to stick to $500 and want something that will allow you to climb and is not too heavy, I would recommend looking for a used bike frame. In particular, if you can get your hands on a Tracer (lots for sale on ebay and mtbr usually), that is the best approx 6lb, 4" travel bike I have ever ridden, period. If you are set on new, I personally love Konas and for $599, this is a very solid frame http://wheelworld.com/site/itemdetai...=39&sort=Price

    In 2001, these were very fast bikes and this is a newly made frame by Kinesis based on that model http://www.greenfishadventuresports....ROD&ProdID=587. Is geared towards climbing as it was based on a racing platform.

    I have not ridden this frame, but I really like this company's bikes: Mountain Cycles http://www.greenfishadventuresports....ROD&ProdID=569

    An Ellsworth Joker for $599, but it looks like sizes may be very limited.
    http://www.cambriabike.com/shopexd.asp?id=8754

    just a fex examples looking real quickly...

    again, let me know what you would be comfortable spending on a complete bike because I do believe that will be a better way to go in this case.

    cheers

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    11

    hmmmm....

    i like both your ideas about how to acquire a bike. i think both ways, for me, would be very do-able. But paying straight up, i don't want to pay a lump sum of over 5 or 6 hundred. But for the finished bike, i expect to end up paying 1500 plus. But for now, i know i can't really do that. But if you really think i can buy a bike for 8 or 9 hundred, and have it be worth the 1500 plus bike that i can build up over time, then by all means, i will do it. Either way, thanks for the links to a few bikes to start looking at.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by theflash2000
    i like both your ideas about how to acquire a bike. i think both ways, for me, would be very do-able. But paying straight up, i don't want to pay a lump sum of over 5 or 6 hundred. But for the finished bike, i expect to end up paying 1500 plus. But for now, i know i can't really do that. But if you really think i can buy a bike for 8 or 9 hundred, and have it be worth the 1500 plus bike that i can build up over time, then by all means, i will do it. Either way, thanks for the links to a few bikes to start looking at.
    Building a bike over time is definitely an option if you have the time and expertise (if you have a LBS build it for you the labor cost will eat up any saving). Normally, most newbie want get a bike and hit the trail and build one up quickly is expensive, so I normally don't even bring up that option.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    11

    that makes sense

    I understand how that works. I can see how newbies would want that and i guess i don't really fit the mold. I can wait because even though i consider myself a newbie, i've been up there, i've done a few trails and i know what i need, what i want(kind of), and i know my bike parts, even though i don't have the nomenclature, or the technical wording down. I have rebuilt my xc fuji, and my trek, so i may be able to do most of my building on my own. I will have to read up on shocks, because those are new to me, but other than that, i will be ok, i think. I have the patience to buy parts, and i have the patience to learn about what i need to learn about, so i am thinking that building it, even though a lot more expensive in the long run, may be more fun, more satisfying, and more worthwhile for me.

  16. #16
    you go ahead
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    709
    NRS?

    I prefer (and am infinetly better at) climbing than descending. That's why I bought an NRS. It will descend better than a hardtail but not like a 4' - 5' trail bike. Under braking the suspension is a little harsh, but one gets used to it over time.

    maybe you could get an NRS composite frame for your price... You might want to ask someone on the giant board for the price.

    rustyb

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    689
    if you want to go cheap and full get a Jamis Dakar for about $750
    www.treefortbikes.com Just lauched V2.0 with free shipping and low prices!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by applegreenheckler
    if you want to go cheap and full get a Jamis Dakar for about $750
    I could wrong, but from his earlier post, flash is looking for a FS climbing machine. He's not going to get that with at the sub 1k range.

    If I'm reading his post right, he's now riding these trails using a cross bike (again I could be wrong here). Now, that would suggest that he needs/wants a light weight FS XC bike with a no pedal bob rear suspension system, something along the line of a Specialzied Epic or Giant NSR.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    11
    yes, that pretty much sounds right. Anything along those lines that will last a long time and is a good solid fs frame, lightweight, and EXCELLENT at climbing.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by theflash2000
    yes, that pretty much sounds right. Anything along those lines that will last a long time and is a good solid fs frame, lightweight, and EXCELLENT at climbing.
    These are more full bikes then frames, but they'll give you idea of what you should be looking for.

    Specialized Epic
    Giant NRS
    Trek Fuel
    Cannondale Scapel
    Kona Kikapu
    Gary Fisher Sugar

    When you're you start shopping for your bike/frame keep the term "cross country" in mind. That's the type of bike/frame you're looking for. Another term you might come across is "soft tail". The Cannondale Scapel is a soft tail, I think Airborne makes one too.

    Anyway, I hope this helps.

Similar Threads

  1. question
    By sky84 in forum Riding Passion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-02-2010, 03:52 PM
  2. Gary Fisher X-Caliber, is it still alive
    By willtsmith_nwi in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-16-2004, 05:58 AM
  3. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 04-06-2004, 05:16 PM
  4. Giant Iguana vs Gary Fisher Tassajara
    By adgrant in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-08-2004, 02:24 PM
  5. Schwinn Mesa vs. Gary Fisher Wahoo
    By niceride22 in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-24-2004, 05:37 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.