Full or Hardtail???- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Full or Hardtail???

    I honestly had no idea of what full susp good bikes were out there. didn think it was poss and still under thousands of dollars!

    well was just wondering about what bike i should buy. i have been looking at the diamondback response sport, and an ironhorse 5.0, but then someone let me on to some full susp bikes by iron horse that i was wondering about. i am used to riding motocross and love to jump but dont know how well even these full susp bikes would hold up.

    should i stick to a decent hardtail or try one of the full susp like the iron horse warrior?

    please help, i am dyin to start riding something!

  2. #2
    Single(Pivot)and Happy
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    What's your budget? A real good FS bike will be $1200 and up USED.
    The suspension of your bike sucks if it's different than mine. Really. It sucks. Big time.

  3. #3
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    There are some decent FS bikes for under $1000, but none of them are particularly "good". The main problem is simple suspension designs and cheap shocks without platform dampening. This results in much more pedal bob than on a more sophisticated frame. Also the weight of a cheapr FS bike is of concern, cheap FS bikes can approach 40 pounds or more. Additionally you typically will get pretty cheap components (i.e. Altus or Alivio) with a FS bike that cheap. The Ironhorse DW link bikes are fantastic, but will cost more than $1000.

    I would say get a nice hardtail, or save up a little more to get something like an Ironhorse MKIII.
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  4. #4
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    Giant Yukon FX msrps under 900 bucks. Looks pretty sweet to me. But for the same price, you'd probably get a little bit more bang in a HT.

  5. #5
    local trails rider
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    I'd say a thousand dollars is still a hardtail budget: you get a very good one for that price vs. a "kind of OK" FS.

    If you like jumping, you should get a bike that is tougher than average, HT or FS. Even the lightest bikes can handle a little air but hard use takes its toll. How much a bike can take is not so much about how far you fall; it is more about how and where you land.

  6. #6
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    Yes it all depends on what you plan to do for riding.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    I'd say a thousand dollars is still a hardtail budget: you get a very good one for that price vs. a "kind of OK" FS.

    If you like jumping, you should get a bike that is tougher than average, HT or FS. Even the lightest bikes can handle a little air but hard use takes its toll. How much a bike can take is not so much about how far you fall; it is more about how and where you land.
    Excellent advice.
    Get off the couch and ride! :)

  8. #8
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    From an enduro rider prospective.
    Hard tail teaches you the basics to keep your bike on 2 wheels.
    I see many rookies riding FS equipment and that's fine.
    Hard tail is all you need.
    Some advice:
    If you are getting into the sport now, don't underestimate things.
    This is as demanding as MX.

  9. #9
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    thanx

    thanks for all the input guys, think i have decided to stick to finding a decent hardtail. how important is it to have disk brakes over the pads?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdr6031
    thanks for all the input guys, think i have decided to stick to finding a decent hardtail. how important is it to have disk brakes over the pads?

    IMO its a big plus. When I went to purchase my bike, countless people told me to get discs and they couldn't be more right. While v-brakes will work just fine, discs just have much more stopping power and work better in all conditions.

  11. #11
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    What are you guys opinions on a few bikes? i have been looking at a diamond back response sport, or an iron horse 5.0(not exactly sure if the model is correct) it has rox shox. dont know if that is a huge plus just know they are a good name brand from reading. i have narrowed my choice down to a few choices simply due to affordability. Needing your help on making my final desicion and getting something that will work for me.

    i have been debating b/w the diamondback response. What is the diff exactly b/w the sport and just the response? Besides the disc braking( which i would rather).
    Also the
    Iron Horse Maverick 5.5 Mountain Bike
    i have noticed from reading that it has what seems to be, from what i read, a name brand "rox shox" fork, and disk brakes.

    The only diff i could tell from actually sitting on the bike is that i liked the whole feel of the DB better, but think was mostly due to the bars being mounted over the front wheel, which i like better, instead of hanging on an extension out over wheel.? Also, i know the rox shox are a named brand, but really felt more plush than the db.

  12. #12
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    A real good FS bike will be $1200 and up USED.
    There are some decent FS bikes for under $1000, but none of them are particularly "good"
    I'd say a thousand dollars is still a hardtail budget: you get a very good one for that price vs. a "kind of OK" FS.
    If you have your heart set on a FS for under $1000, pay no attention to them. I built this Trek Fuel EX9 from frame for a bit more than $800:






    If you are handy with a wrench, it can be done.

  13. #13
    Single(Pivot)and Happy
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdhood
    If you have your heart set on a FS for under $1000, pay no attention to them.If you are handy with a wrench, it can be done.
    rdhood, nice Trek. rdhood, how long have you been riding mountain bikes? You see, this is the "Beginners Forum". No one said you can't build a FS for under $1000. For someone getting into the sport, without having saddle time and experience, to try and piece together a bike without knowlege and experience, relying on conflicting opinions in forums such as here, would not serve the OP very well.

    And for $800, the OP could probably find a 2-3 year old top level HT with a better fork, wheelset and weigh 4-7 pounds lighter than your Trek.
    The suspension of your bike sucks if it's different than mine. Really. It sucks. Big time.

  14. #14
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    +1 for getting a decent hardtail on a budget of < $1000, not a 'cheap' FS that will soon frustrate you with obvious shortcomings as you develop your skills.

    i'm assuming you're not up for building a bike (yet!). i wouldn't recommend that until you know what you want form a bike.

    on that point, i wouldn't spend $$$ on any bike until you're sure you know what sort of riding you want to do - general trail riding with some paved road, lots of jumping, fast cross-country riding, epic all-day rides in the wilderness, urban freeride etc etc. or a bit of everything (as far as possible)... some bikes are extremely specialized and therefore unsuitable for many other applications (eg full-on downhill bikes are a PITA to ride on any other sort of trail), others are far more 'general purpose'. you might consider getting an entry-level hardtail for much less than $1000 until you know what you really want, then sell that HT on and get a bike that truly suits your needs.

    re components, Rock Shox is a decent brand (and one on the up, it wasn't so respected a few years back) but with all brand names in MTBing you *must* check the details of the particular item you're looking at. for example Shimano and SRAM produce some top-notch gear. They also produce some bottom-of-the-range tat. Check out the mtber.com reviews section until you know the relevant parts backwards, and make sure you know what you're getting., the brand name alone is no guarantee of quality.

  15. #15
    Rod
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    It would be extremely hard to find "light" parts and time consuming to build up a "good" full suspension bike for under a grand, especially if the person building the bike doesn't have any bikes to strip parts off of. Your bike is nice, but I wouldn't recommend a newbie to go through that process.

  16. #16
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    i would go w/ a hardtail, i came from a motocross background too, but i love the challenge of my hardtail on DH and FR, its so much cheaper, and less can go wrong
    also it'll teach you how to land and manouver over things that you'll need to build skill with
    8BALL UP8

  17. #17
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    you can get a brand spankin new trance for a grand right from the lbs. not the best components, but tolerable, and a fantastic frame and proven suspension.

    ill personally never buy a hardtail again. its not some stuck up fs superiority complex. its really not that much "better" or faster or anything.. but it beats me up less. my body is happier at the end of a ride, and i have more fun on a fs bike.

  18. #18
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    Hardtails are excellent bikes for beginners, especially for XC riding. I've ridden hardtails my whole life, but full suspension offers an incredible ride that is certainly much smoother than what you get from a hardtail bike, but FS don't climb as well and can are slightly heavier and much, much more expensive than hardtail which offers a smooth enough ride for most riders.
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