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  1. #1
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    Freewheel noise?

    Does all modern wheels sound like this when not pedaling: Vinvin new mavic crossride 2011 series - YouTube

    My new DT Swiss wheels have same loud sound. Was a bit surprised since my 15 year old wheels don't make any sound Is there a way to make the sound dissappear? I rather listen the sounds of nature when cycling than the sound of the bike. This isn't a motorcycle after all
    Last edited by empre; 10-04-2012 at 06:05 PM.

  2. #2
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    Is it the same cassette or freewheel that you are using? That does sound like it is the freewheel and not the tire itself.

  3. #3
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    Since most of the parts of a bicycle wheel are at least somewhat interchangeable, it's useful to distinguish between complete wheels, tires, and parts of wheels, like hubs. To my knowledge, DT Swiss doesn't make tires.

    A lot of modern hubs are quite loud. Sometimes packing them with grease quiets them down. Shimano's hubs and freewheels are pretty quiet.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
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    The DT Swiss uses their own system I think: DT Swiss - X 1600 SPLINE<sup></sup>

    I was planning to buy Mavic Crossrides but is there some wheels that don't make that sound?

    My rear wheel makes 18 "clicks" in one turn.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Shimano's hubs and freewheels are pretty quiet.
    MTBR won't let me be "that guy" this much. I have to at least enter some new text.

    PS: What do you want from new wheels? What do you have now? What don't you like about them?

    Also, system wheels suck. IMHO.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    To my knowledge, DT Swiss doesn't make tires.
    Should read wheels will fix that.

  7. #7
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    That's the freehub making that sound and as AndrewSwitch says quite a lot of modern mtb hubs make a racket. That sounds just like my hope pro II evo's, even after a clean and lube the Hopes are just as loud, chriskings can be quietend by packing them with grease. The 105 hubs on my road bike are silent and all shimano MTN hubs are much quieter - A wheelset based around SLX or XT hubs would be a good choice.
    Other option to quieten them is don't stop pedaling.... ;-)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    PS: What do you want from new wheels? What do you have now? What don't you like about them?

    Also, system wheels suck. IMHO.
    The max pressure for DT Swiss wheels is 4 bars and I'm using 1.75" tires so the pressure should be between 3-5bars. Every pumps gauge I've used have shown different readings and for example one floor pump I used yesterday showed 3 bars, but my new Lezyne mini floor pump showed almost 4 bars. 4 bars is what I like to ride to get lower friction. It's the sweat spot for me on the urban areas and hard roads. DT Swiss could handle the 4 bars I need but I would take take big risk if I pump over 3,5 bars because you never know how accurate the gauge is. I don't want to broke the wheels because they are pretty expensive

    Mavic wheels can handle 5.2 bars at that tyre size so there is a lot of room for error. Also Mavic is like 3x cheaper.

    Also I haven't used the DT Swiss tyres yet so I can sell them as new.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SimpleJon View Post
    A wheelset based around SLX or XT hubs would be a good choice.
    You mean something like this: Bike24 - Shimano-Mavic MTB Disc Wheelset Deore XT M756 - XM 319 black

    Weight is 2kg. so only 100g more than Mavic Crossride. Price is 5 more so not much difference there.

    Does that model in the link work with Sram PG 1050 10-speed 11-32 cassette (I'm using 3x10 XO's)?

  10. #10
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    Do you do any mountain biking?

    IME, MTBs on the road are pretty much pigs compared to road bikes and that's that. They're fine for commuting, but I think it's silly to try to make a MTB be high-performance for road. Sort of like putting summer tires on a jeep - now it's not good in mud and snow, but it's still not a sports car.

    A used road bike can be cheap and performs better than a de-clawed mountain bike. And it's not an abomination.

    Pump gauges are actually not that bad. But you have to understand what the gauge is measuring - it's the pressure in the pump cylinder. Inner tubes are valved, so until you've brought the pressure in the pump up to at least the pressure in the inner tube, they're not the same thing and the gauge won't tell you anything useful. If you're worried about it, get a pressure gauge that's just a pressure gauge.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
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    I checked some Shimano XT hub vids from youtube and it seems to make some sound too.

    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Do you do any mountain biking?

    IME, MTBs on the road are pretty much pigs compared to road bikes and that's that. They're fine for commuting, but I think it's silly to try to make a MTB be high-performance for road. Sort of like putting summer tires on a jeep - now it's not good in mud and snow, but it's still not a sports car.

    A used road bike can be cheap and performs better than a de-clawed mountain bike. And it's not an abomination.

    Pump gauges are actually not that bad. But you have to understand what the gauge is measuring - it's the pressure in the pump cylinder. Inner tubes are valved, so until you've brought the pressure in the pump up to at least the pressure in the inner tube, they're not the same thing and the gauge won't tell you anything useful. If you're worried about it, get a pressure gauge that's just a pressure gauge.
    Very little. I like the MTB riding position more and I like the handling of MTB. MTB is great in urban areas and cities too. Worked fine for daily fitness so far also (haven't rode the new bike yet but have done daily 20km fitness drive with my old MTB for 2 years now).

  12. #12
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    IMO, don't bother. Just ride the wheels you've got, and be happy.

    The tires were already the big change. Anything after that is going to result in very minor changes to how the bike rides. With bikes ridden off-road, it can be nice to have a slightly quicker handling feel, which lighter rims can contribute to. But they don't really effect speed in any quantifiable way. And I gotta say, switching to a fatter tire recently may have increased the rotational weight I need to move around on my bike, but it didn't take long at all to get used to it, and I really like having more traction and a smoother ride - basically, I think that while cutting rotating weight is less stupid than getting a lighter crank, it's still an extremely overrated way to spend money.

    If you find you're riding a lot of volume on pavement and you're getting more ambitious with your rides, give road bikes another look. While the handlebars take a little getting used to, it's not like there's trail chatter trying to yank them out of one's hands. Both classes of bike are really handled from the hip anyway, but road bikes usually have shorter wheel bases and it's easier to get them lighter, so the handling is a lot faster. That's a lot of fun. For me, mountain bikes get pretty uncomfortable when I ride them in a static position for more than a half hour or so. So pretty close to the length of your rides, I think. As the miles stack up, I want more and more to be on my road bike. Actually, I guess I don't... I'm on my road bike in the first place, if I'm doing a bunch of miles on the road.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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    I would never get a bike with a dropdown bars, but one of those "urban & fitness" style bikes with a straight handlebar could work.

    I tried my friends hybrid once and the driving position was pretty retarded. Shorter top tube length and narrower handleba... when I rode I was thinking "I will never ride hybrid again" it felt so bad compared to my fully rigid MTB. A little longer stem and new seat that could go further back would have helped
    Last edited by empre; 10-04-2012 at 08:06 PM.

  14. #14
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    LOL, hybrids pretty much suck.

    I think a lot of people get turned off by road bikes because they do things a little backwards - they start with a road bike and try to fit their riding position to it. Usually not to the parts of it that are for most riding, no less.

    A big part of getting road bikes to work well is to start with the riding position you like and put the brake hoods where you want your hands to be. That's actually the main riding position, although there are some variations. I tend to ride with my hands a little back of the hoods, for example. Once your handlebars are located, that dictates how long a top tube and how long a head tube are necessary.

    Cycle tourists figured this out a while ago. Having low drop bars like on a race bike doesn't really work well with that style of riding. They don't go that fast or work so hard, they ride for many hours, they stop and start and take pictures.

    I can't imagine riding with this much crap strapped to my bike on purpose. It's not what I like about the sport. But you can see that this guy landed his handlebars where he'd get a comfortable riding position for long days and not racing.


    It sounds like you've already got the bike and it suits your current desires. That's great. I just don't think it makes sense to spend money trying to turn a mountain bike into a road bike when there are already road bikes available, and they're already road bikes.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  15. #15
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    Is there narrow winter tyres for those more road style bikes? I'm not sure how well those narrow tyres would do during winter...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by empre View Post
    The DT Swiss uses their own system I think: DT Swiss - X 1600 SPLINE<sup></sup>

    I was planning to buy Mavic Crossrides but is there some wheels that don't make that sound?

    My rear wheel makes 18 "clicks" in one turn.
    I would take the DT Swiss ratchet system over the Mavic freehub system any day of the week.

    If that is the set of wheels you have and you really don't care for them, I would happily trade you a wheelset with Shimano 629 rear/SLX front hubs with Stan's Flow rims for them. The Shimano freehubs are much quieter

    If you think the DT Swiss hub is loud, don't even think of getting a Hope or Chris King rear hub.

    If you try to quiet the DT Swiss freehub by packing it with grease, don't put too much in or it could make the ratchet skip. It might quiet it down a little, but it won't be as quiet as a Shimano freehub. BUT, it will be strong, reliable, and easy to service.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by empre View Post
    Is there narrow winter tyres for those more road style bikes? I'm not sure how well those narrow tyres would do during winter...
    Surly says this bike takes up to a 2.1" tire in the 26" version and up to a 45 mm tire in the 700C version. A bit less with fenders mounted. So yeah - room for knobbies or studded tires if you like. Of course you can always go narrower.

    With a bit bigger wheel and the right pressure, I find I don't need a ton of tire. On the road bike I ride unladen, I use 23 mm tires. My commuter has 25s right now, but I think I'd like the ride a little better with 28s - I'm at max. pressure to keep the rear tire from pinch flatting when I bang it into something.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by empre View Post
    Is there narrow winter tyres for those more road style bikes? I'm not sure how well those narrow tyres would do during winter...
    Depends on the bike and your definition of "winter".

    "Real road bikes" (aka race bikes) have very tight tyre clearance.

    Wider tires can be better for winter ... or not. For example, narrow tires can cut through mud or soft snow, where fat ones try to stay on top and fail.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  19. #19
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    Jeez the steerer tube on that Long Haul Trucker is ridiculous. Not sure if I would trust that.

  20. #20
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    It's probably steel. I sometimes wonder why Surly doesn't do taller head tubes, though.

    Rivendell seems to be pretty good about making bikes laid out to be sat on bolt upright.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  21. #21
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    Scream of the Chris King is pretty awesome!

  22. #22
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    Can somebody please tell me why back wheels have this ratchet sound/system, i hate it, im with the OP here, i have DT Swiss wheels and its a horrible sound coming out of the back wheel, surly if we can get a man to the moon we can make silent rear wheels on bikes.
    Could somebody please explain the machinations of what the ratchet in the rear wheel is and why we need it, cheers
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  23. #23
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    I quite like the sound not only does it take me back to 1970's BMX days it also hides the sound of my hyperventilation and heart thumping its way through my chest wall, rib cage and pectoral so it's absolutely OK with me!
    Btw DT Swiss, hopes and kings would all be silent on the moon

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's L'axeman View Post
    Can somebody please tell me why back wheels have this ratchet sound/system, i hate it, im with the OP here, i have DT Swiss wheels and its a horrible sound coming out of the back wheel, surly if we can get a man to the moon we can make silent rear wheels on bikes.
    Could somebody please explain the machinations of what the ratchet in the rear wheel is and why we need it, cheers
    One of my racing bikes doesn't have it. But you need some kind of a clutch to have a bike that can coast.

    The mechanism varies. The most common is that there's a ring gear either inside the hub shell or around the freehub body and the other part has pawls with little springs. The tooth shape of the ring gear is such that in one direction, it pushes the pawls out of the way and in the other direction it engages them. When things are operating in the coasting mode, the pawls spring back down between teeth, and make the sound. More teeth and stiffer springs make for a louder hub. There are a couple of other mechanisms too.

    Like I said earlier, if it bothers you, you can often quiet the bike down if you pack the hub with grease.

    And if it 415 USD of bothers you, buy a Stealth hub. They're supposed to be pretty nice, if heavy, and very quiet.

    Personally, I find it to be a bit of a non-issue. My bike is loud on the way down anyway, and I don't coast much on the way up or on flat to rolling singletrack.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  25. #25
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    Freewheel noise is music to my ears....It takes me back to my 80's BMX days

    You could always buy a single speed bike witha Coasta Brake...

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    One of my racing bikes doesn't have it. But you need some kind of a clutch to have a bike that can coast.

    The mechanism varies. The most common is that there's a ring gear either inside the hub shell or around the freehub body and the other part has pawls with little springs. The tooth shape of the ring gear is such that in one direction, it pushes the pawls out of the way and in the other direction it engages them. When things are operating in the coasting mode, the pawls spring back down between teeth, and make the sound. More teeth and stiffer springs make for a louder hub. There are a couple of other mechanisms too.

    Like I said earlier, if it bothers you, you can often quiet the bike down if you pack the hub with grease.

    And if it 415 USD of bothers you, buy a Stealth hub. They're supposed to be pretty nice, if heavy, and very quiet.

    Personally, I find it to be a bit of a non-issue. My bike is loud on the way down anyway, and I don't coast much on the way up or on flat to rolling singletrack.
    Thanks mate, i suspected it was along those lines but i wondered why some bikes didnt make the noise n others did, and no it doesnt bother me to the tune of $415 lol, i can live with it, thanks for the explanation Andrew, cheers.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    I would take the DT Swiss ratchet system over the Mavic freehub system any day of the week.
    agreed...

    If that is the set of wheels you have and you really don't care for them, I would happily trade you a wheelset with Shimano 629 rear/SLX front hubs with Stan's Flow rims for them. The Shimano freehubs are much quieter

    If you think the DT Swiss hub is loud, don't even think of getting a Hope or Chris King rear hub.
    or even worse - I9

    If you try to quiet the DT Swiss freehub by packing it with grease, don't put too much in or it could make the ratchet skip. It might quiet it down a little, but it won't be as quiet as a Shimano freehub. BUT, it will be strong, reliable, and easy to service.
    i would not use grease at all, as it will make the pawls "sticky" and they would not engage quickly enough, which may cause some damage to the internals...

    unless specified by the manufacturef (chris king has their own lubricant for their hubs) - i would go with very light oil, and in low quantities to lube the internals of the free hub...

  28. #28
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    hey Tone's

    if you spend $300 on a Chris King rear hub or even worse - I9 - you may want to let everyone know that Tone's has the bling... the real deal... the package...

    besides, when you are approaching slower riders on the trail - they will jump out of the way to let you go as they can hear you coming from a long way back...

    chicks dig it too... the louder the better... don't be humble...


    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's L'axeman View Post
    Can somebody please tell me why back wheels have this ratchet sound/system, i hate it, im with the OP here, i have DT Swiss wheels and its a horrible sound coming out of the back wheel, surly if we can get a man to the moon we can make silent rear wheels on bikes.
    Could somebody please explain the machinations of what the ratchet in the rear wheel is and why we need it, cheers

  29. #29
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    Always check the manual, of course. But most hubs require a certain amount of grease to insure good function. Oil doesn't stick very well, and since the hub is sealed, grease should stay pretty clean.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  30. #30
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    Yes, the noise is normal. Yes, you can open it up and apply some grease but it only quiet them down temporarily. I've done this on DT hubs and Stan's hubs, it's only temporary relief. The fact that the video was recorded in a room with tile walls only amplifies the sounds anyway.

    Think of the sound as a means of alarming the hikers/bikers/walkers/horse riders ahead of you that you are approaching.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ambassadorhawg View Post
    Yes, the noise is normal. Yes, you can open it up and apply some grease but it only quiet them down temporarily. I've done this on DT hubs and Stan's hubs, it's only temporary relief.
    DT Swiss hubs require DT Swiss made grease for rear hubs...
    Mavic hubs require thin oil for lubricating rear hub. Mavic hub warranty will be void if grease is used... (<cite>ceramicspeed.com/media/10757/Mavic_SLR_2.pdf) step #23</cite>

    It is important to check manufacturers specs before overhauling rear hubs. if in doubt - i'd use oil over grease.

    but as 'hawg suggested - it will be only a temporary relief. DT and few other hubs are loud by design... American Classic hubs are quieter, at least on my wheelset, compared to DT Swiss.

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