Frame Size Advice Needed- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. Frame Size Advice Needed

    Hello,

    Looking closely at a Motobecane bike, but I need some advice on frame size, first.

    So, if I feel a 19" suits me perfectly in most situations, but if the sizes offered are 18" and 20", then which is the safetest bet? What if the fork on the bike has 130mm travel and Bikesdirect states at full travel the standover height is 1.5" more?

    I'm 6'2" and about 195lbs. I did the book spine in the crotch (man that just cracks me up!) measurement which was just about 33". I've got a pretty decent wingspan with a little longer than average reach.

    I like the feel of a 19" bike, in general. I wish I had one available to me to actually try out...

    Thanks in advance for any advice!

    J-

  2. #2
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    Compare the Moto frame measurements to those of a bike at your local bike shop. I'd bet they sell Trek, Specialized... something like that.

    Go to the store and sit on a few sizes that are close to the specs of your Moto you are looking at.

    Once you find one that feels ok, write down the size, and order the Moto in the closest size possible.

    LBS = showroom. Use it for what it is... and they may even cut you a deal. ??
    - The only thing that keeps me on a bike is happiness.

  3. #3
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    You, sir, are a genius. Such a painfully obvious answer evaded me. Thanks! I don't even have to do that. I'll just look up the measurements of a few bikes I already know fit me and go from there. Thanks again!

  4. #4
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    Also the top tube measurement is the most important. You don't want to feel too cramped or stretched out. Stand over is important, but not as important as top tube. Like you already stated compare the bikes that fit you well to the motobecane. Also don't forget about headtube angle. I believe Motobecane uses tried and trued angles, but I would still double check that. I would also double check the chain stay lengths, especially if it's a 29er. to save you some time, I think you would probably fit on a 20 before an an 18. I would start there. Good luck to you

  5. #5
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    Keep in mind also that you can switch out the stem for a shorter one if you feel too stretched out on the 20.

  6. #6
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    What size will an XL be in a specialized bike?

  7. #7
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    This fit calculator is pretty good. Make sure to select "mountain" and not "road" under bike type. Fit Calculator - Competitive Cyclist

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmit450 View Post
    What size will an XL be in a specialized bike?
    Specialized can be a little longer than many of their competitor's bikes that are the same 'size'.

    Don't let the size thing torque your gourd too much. It's a very strange and confusing thing the way manufacturer's 'size' their bikes.

    Since most modern bikes utilize the compact geometry type design with a sloping top tube, a given size will accomodate a large variety of body proportions provided the top tube length is appropriate. Unfortunately, bikes are sized according to seat tube length, and to make it even more confusing, even bikes from the same company of a similar size can have very different top tube lengths depending on the intent of who and what the bike is aimed at accomplishing.

    Look up the ETT (effective top tube) size for an 18.5", 6000 series Trek 26" wheel hardtail, and compare it to an 18" 3000 or 4000 series bike from Trek and you'll see what I mean. Specialized, and others do the same thing.

    Why? Because they are aimed at different riders. The 3000 and 4000 series Trek hardtails are aimed more at entry level/recreational riders that may do better with, and prefer, a more upright riding position, whereas a more skilled, and more serious rider may prefer the benefits of a relatively longer top tube.

    Also, what may feel like a better fit to a newbie, may not be a great fit when you try to ride more aggressively. For that reason, new riders that don't have more experienced riding friends, might do well to go through their local bike shop (LBS) for their entry level bike purchase provided they do at least a simple fit assessment and ask enough questions about the type of riding you do and want to do in the future.

    For entry level bikes, getting the correct top tube length (it's more of a range than an exact number since there some things that can dial in the fit) is probably the most important sizing consideration, inch measurements of seat tube lengths and S, M, L, XL designations be damned.

  9. #9
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    I am 6'2 205 so we are very similar. In a 26er I feel better on an XL and on a 29er I felt better on the L. A trek Mamba 29 in Large felt good for me, but I ended up with a full suspension GT 26er in XL and feels great size wise.

  10. #10
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    Also if you had to choose between 18 and 20 for a 29er I would go 20 for sure.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    Specialized can be a little longer than many of their competitor's bikes that are the same 'size'.

    Don't let the size thing torque your gourd too much. It's a very strange and confusing thing the way manufacturer's 'size' their bikes.

    Since most modern bikes utilize the compact geometry type design with a sloping top tube, a given size will accomodate a large variety of body proportions provided the top tube length is appropriate. Unfortunately, bikes are sized according to seat tube length, and to make it even more confusing, even bikes from the same company of a similar size can have very different top tube lengths depending on the intent of who and what the bike is aimed at accomplishing.

    Look up the ETT (effective top tube) size for an 18.5", 6000 series Trek 26" wheel hardtail, and compare it to an 18" 3000 or 4000 series bike from Trek and you'll see what I mean. Specialized, and others do the same thing.

    Why? Because they are aimed at different riders. The 3000 and 4000 series Trek hardtails are aimed more at entry level/recreational riders that may do better with, and prefer, a more upright riding position, whereas a more skilled, and more serious rider may prefer the benefits of a relatively longer top tube.

    Also, what may feel like a better fit to a newbie, may not be a great fit when you try to ride more aggressively. For that reason, new riders that don't have more experienced riding friends, might do well to go through their local bike shop (LBS) for their entry level bike purchase provided they do at least a simple fit assessment and ask enough questions about the type of riding you do and want to do in the future.

    For entry level bikes, getting the correct top tube length (it's more of a range than an exact number since there some things that can dial in the fit) is probably the most important sizing consideration, inch measurements of seat tube lengths and S, M, L, XL designations be damned.
    Good info...so I fall just above the recommended length of the l and xl top tube length. Damn one second I feel like I did the right thing by going XL and one min I don't. I rode the xl first to test and just did that in the parking lot and I felt more stable on that size and then I went to the large and I felt more compact and scrunched. But I am new to 29er so that is why I am alittle freaked

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmit450 View Post
    Good info...so I fall just above the recommended length of the l and xl top tube length. Damn one second I feel like I did the right thing by going XL and one min I don't. I rode the xl first to test and just did that in the parking lot and I felt more stable on that size and then I went to the large and I felt more compact and scrunched. But I am new to 29er so that is why I am alittle freaked
    If I had to take a stab at a size for most 6'2" riders on a Specialized (Rochhopper?), XL would probably be my choice for you, but not necessarily 'always'. At any rate, I wouldn't worry too much about it. If you're a tad stretched, you could opt for a shorter stem, say about 20mm shorter than stock, and see if that makes you more comfortable. Being scrunched up when I am riding aggressively is dangerous when I feel like I am going over the bars under hard braking if I can't get far enough behind the handlebar.

  13. #13
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    I'm 6ft exactly. I like 18-19 inch for standard XC geometry. The more aggressive the bike style the less that measurement has any meaning, which I found out to my cost because I bough a 20 inch Konda Free Ride hard-tail, it wasn't the 20 inch which killed it it was that the bike was too long for me and would have suited an 18 inch bike better.

    In short if you are doing knarl riding, go short, it makes the bike more maneuverable, exact fit is only really important only for pedally racing type bikes. You can see this with all those 'small' 14-15 inch standard DJ, 4X and slopestyle bikes.

    My current bike is 17.5 inch a single pivot AM/FR FS bike and I think it's perfect.

  14. #14
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    try to sit or ride on many different size bike and feel it by yourself..

    i am 183cm but i am feeling comfortable with riding a M size bike that is undersize for me..

    when i ride on a L size the top tube kiss my ball...

    must try before u decided..

    cheers

  15. #15
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    I'm 6'2", 34.75" bicycle inseam. 24.5" ETT fits best for me, which is usually a large. Been pulling the stem length down from 110 to now 90. Don't go XL. Yes, it feels better in the parking lot, but is that what you intend to ride: parking lots? No. If you're riding technical trails, then smaller is better. Most beginner riders buy a bike that is too big for them. Get the smallest bike you are comfortable on.

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