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Thread: Fox Float R

  1. #1
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    Fox Float R

    I recently bought a well used and reasonably well maintained Trek Fuel 100 circa 2002 or so. I've never had a FS bike before and am wondering if over time should the air seep out of the rear suspension. We put 250 psi in it and that seemed fine, I haven't measured since, but it feels a lot squishier when I'm peddling over flat terrain. Any Suggestions?

  2. #2
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    How long did it take for the air to leak out? It could be that the air sleeve/seals are worn from age and use.
    :wq

  3. #3
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    About two months or so. Are those replaceable? without too much cost, or should I jsut keep pumping air into the shock until the thing completely dies and then get a new one?

  4. #4
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    Assuming it is air leakage you could look at the Fox service videos page:

    http://www.foxracingshox.com/fox_tec...ice_videos.htm

    Not sure on the parts cost. You might also contact a bike shop local to you and inquire about shock service rates.
    :wq

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    While things containing air shouldn't let it out, that's just not realistic. I top up my air fork when I do my tires, probably every week or two.

    A frequent culprit for air leaks is the oil leaking out. It can migrate past the seals in an air system when the shock cycles. So if your shock loses air pressure unacceptably fast, that's often the problem. You may not actually need to replace parts, other than the oil. Of course new seals should give better performance there too.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
    meow meow
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    for a shock that old the seals should probably be replaced regardless.

  7. #7
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    One thing about old forks, parts are hard to find.

  8. #8
    Never trust a fart
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    I'd personally wait till it leaks down much faster. Most shock/fork manufacturers recommend checking air pressure before EVERY ride. I check mine once or twice a week. All depends on how much riding I do.

  9. #9
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    I have a new Fox Float and literally over MONTHS it leaks little to no air.
    :wq

  10. #10
    EDR
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    should I jsut keep pumping air into the shock until the thing completely dies and then get a new one?
    Absolutely not.

    If it's really leaking, an air sleeve rebuild is in order. It's very simple to do on an Float shock and the cost for the kit ranges from $9 to $25 depending on your lbs. I personally have never paid more than 10 bucks for the kit but some shops near me charge more than twice that. Shop around.

    Service videos can easily be found on the Fox website or on YouTube. For a first timer it's probably a 1 to 2 hour job max, depending on how difficult it is to remove the shock from your frame.

    You need to be sure it's leaking though. If you are new to the rear suspension thing then maybe you are just getting used to it and it may be performing the same but just 'feels' different. Kinda like how a new to you car might feel very fast and responsive but that feeling kinda goes away with more drive time. I suggest checking the air pressure again with a shock pump, if it's much more than 10 or 15psi lower than what you pumped it up to then it might be leaking. (a 10psi drop when hooking up the gauge again is normal as it has to pressurize the pumps hose, thus it reads lower than what you last pumped it up to)

    Another thing. 250psi is a lot of pressure for modern day Floats, not sure about an '02. Typically you run about your body weight give or take 15psi, how much do you weigh?

    Here's a link of what I'm talking about:
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...leeve+Kit.aspx
    Last edited by eatdrinkride; 10-12-2010 at 10:16 PM.

  11. #11
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    So Oil and Seals when the weather turns bad. Check. Thanks guys. I'll get a shock pump and check the pressure every so often as well.
    @eatdrinkride. I am new to this rear suspension thing, that's why I'm asking. I bought it as a temp bike until I got my other one back on warranty from Trek, but I kinda love the Fuel.

    I tend to like my fork pretty stiff up front and wanted the rear stiff as well. I weighed about 246 this spring, none of my pants fit anymore so I'm probably less than that. The Owners manual says the shock can hold up to 300psi.

    I really don't like the bouncing up and down effect when I'm on relatively level terrain which is what I'm noticing right now (when I first rode it with 250psi it didn't seem to bounce as much), plus I feel like I'm probably losing power that should be going to my pedals.

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