Fixing up my Yeti- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Fixing up my Yeti

    Hey guys!

    I'm interested in picking up mountain biking and my dad has had a bike sitting in his garage for what seems like 20 years. I did a little bit of research on the brand and it looks like new ones are pretty pricey.

    My question is - would this bike be worth fixing up? Or would you recommend buying a new one?

    I took it to a local bike shop and they estimated about $600 in repairs to get it going like new.

    It's a Yeti ASR not sure what year be bought it but it looks like an early 2000 model.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fixing up my Yeti-img_1331.jpg  


  2. #2
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    If you're doing the labor yourself, go for it. $600 is a lot of money to throw at a bike that old. they probably need to rebuild the fork and shock. after you do all that, you've spend more than half of what a decent hardtail would cost and now you have a museum piece that will hold a candle to the handling of a modern bike.

    curious, what's on the diagnosis from the shop? it might be hard to even find the parts needed for the suspension any more.

  3. #3
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    I don't remember the exact diagnosis but they did recommend rebuilding the fork, shock, and new tires.

  4. #4
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    Worth fixing, imho.

    First things first - air up the tires and make sure the shock/fork holds pressure and go ride it. Then you can start seeing what needs what. You will probably need new tires as the old ones might crumble on you. The shock and fork will need servicing, but it's not an immediate fix (unless it is). The drivetrain/shifters/brakes/etc might still be just fine, but you will see that out on the trail.

    Bottom line - you don't need to drop $600 at once just to go ride. Fix the things that need servicing as they come up, and if it gets too much then sell it and use the $$ towards a new bike.
    Life is easy. Figure out the price of whatever it is you want to do, then pay that price.

  5. #5
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    Quality parts are going to be an issue with that bike. The industry has moved on considerably since 2000. If you start to really get into riding you're going to want to upgrade the bike, but the outdated standards and sizes will make that essentially impossible. The geometry is what we used to call the NORBA geo. More akin to a road bike than a modern MTB. Wheels are 26" with rim brakes where modern bikes are 27.5 or 29 with disc brakes. 3x9 drivetrain vs modern 1x12 drivetrains that do a much better job of keeping the chain on. The fork on that bike has a straight steerer tube rather than a tapered steerer so you will not be able to get a decent replacement. Overall it's just not worth it if you're looking to have something to ride hard that you can also upgrade as you go.
    . . . . . . . .

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by scatterbrained View Post
    Quality parts are going to be an issue with that bike. The industry has moved on considerably since 2000. If you start to really get into riding you're going to want to upgrade the bike, but the outdated standards and sizes will make that essentially impossible. The geometry is what we used to call the NORBA geo. More akin to a road bike than a modern MTB. Wheels are 26" with rim brakes where modern bikes are 27.5 or 29 with disc brakes. 3x9 drivetrain vs modern 1x12 drivetrains that do a much better job of keeping the chain on. The fork on that bike has a straight steerer tube rather than a tapered steerer so you will not be able to get a decent replacement. Overall it's just not worth it if you're looking to have something to ride hard that you can also upgrade as you go.
    Thats actually a cool borderline vintage bike that looks to have some pretty good components. Now if youre looking to go bomb trails with some enduro bros and hit some jumps, this is not the bike for it. But if you want to hit the XC trails this will do fine. Is it wortg putting that much money into? Dunno

  7. #7
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    The suspension isn't really serviceable. I would put new tires on it, make sure the shifting/braking works, and just ride it. It is a perfect bike to find out if you are really interested in mountain biking. If you really do like mountain biking, you'll be glad in 6 months to a year that you didn't just run out and buy a new bike right away because you'll have a much better idea of what you want.

    I don't think you can even buy $600-1000 mountain bikes in stores right now anyway?
    My name is George. Iím unemployed and I live with my parents.
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  8. #8
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    doing the work yourself? yes but dont expect much
    Upgrade or throwing 600 at it? no freakin way

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