First "real" Mountian Bike- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    First "real" Mountian Bike

    So, I've purchased a Gary Fisher Wahoo. I'm pretty happy with the bike, but find it taking some beatings rather ungracefully... Recently had my left crank arm fail on me. The bolt kept working itself loose. However, I took it back to the shop which I purchased it from, and they warrantied it. They replaced the arm with a Shimano Alivio, as opposed to my Shimano FC-M361 Acera Crankset arm. They also noticed my 3rd gear ring on the crank gears was warped... Now, I know how that happened, but are there crank gears made to take some abuse? Also, in general, what parts should/could I replace and/or buy replacements for for when they do break (trust me, I'll break something... )? Would this Shimano Alivio FC-M410 Crankset be an upgrade? Would this take any more/less abuse that my current about-to-be-broken gear ring?

    Any general adivce appreciated!
    Last edited by skep18; 04-24-2010 at 01:57 PM.

  2. #2
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    Cliffnotes

    I need some recommended sturdy parts which take some abuse if need-be.

  3. #3
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    I was looking at these bikes.They are designed for XC and not really for taking a ton of abuse. Of course I don't know what your definition is, but I like to ride urban and hit drops, and also ride tougher trails.

  4. #4
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    Hmm, I've given my Trek 4300 a good amount of abuse (or so I'd like to think) and the only thing that I've had to mess with is something in the drivetrain coming loose and making a clanking noise, which is fixed.

  5. #5
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    My "abuse" tends to be in the form of going over rugged terrain (errosion, roots, etc) at high-ish speeds (downhill stretches in higher gears).

    But Idk, within 40 days, I've gotten my LBS to warranty 2 items... not including that "free cable adjust" to tighten cables. I've gotten 2 new parts, one free, one half off. But nehow...

    I've been gandering Shimano's lines and was wondering, what "level" is durable enough? My ring came messed from a log skinny. I know they sell gurads for rings, but havent seen any myself (link plz?). I just need some stuff that will take some failed daring attempts in a forest atmosphere.

  6. #6
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    I purchased a wahoo disk about a year ago and have taken many a good hard ride with it. The only things to give out were a broken chain and the rear brake seems warped. The tires suck, ive burnt through the rear one already but thats mostly from too much riding around town. And the paint seems to scratch really easy. Thinking of upgrading the brakes to the Avid bb7 but other than that im pretty happy with the componets

  7. #7
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    For a living I repair racing yachts. Just doing stupid repairs for silly people who collide at sea. 98% of the repairs that I do, shouldn't have happened, they are not even accidents.

    I do so many stupid repairs, I tell the owners that I'm totally booked out with work, which is not how it always is, silly or impulsive people do not make good clients. I say to the owners, there is not a single race win, or a race advantage or even after an entire season of racing, where damaging the boat was worth it.

    Then I say, no one even remembers who won last year's Championship, let alone last weeks race, do you know? ... and your boat will not ever be the same. They always tend to agree.

    What has this got to do with cycling? ... not much.

    Warren.luck
    Last edited by Wild Wassa; 04-25-2010 at 12:43 AM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Wassa
    What has this got to do with cycling? ... not much.

    Warren.luck
    Hahah, nice. If the repairs cost thousands and thousands to do, trust me, I wouldn't dream of it. But, if repairs here are like $30 here and there, even a hundred every once in a while, I'll be doing whatever I can on that bike, and however it exits the woods, I'll figure it out n get it fixed. I mean, some things IMO make biking a blast, and they're not always good for the bike...

    But nehow, glad to hear positive reviews. I think I'm gonna buy that Alivio Crankset for when mine breaks (no down time) and try and bend back my original one (after the new one is in).

  9. #9
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    Check out the Deore crankset on JensonUSA.com. It's on sale for like $39.00, marked down from $89.00. Seems sturdy enough.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardtailkid
    Check out the Deore crankset on JensonUSA.com. It's on sale for like $39.00, marked down from $89.00. Seems sturdy enough.
    I saw that. What exactly will that come with?

    said, "Deore crankset on JensonUSA.com"

  11. #11
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    Skep, I'm pleased that you smiled at the comparison my post was making.

    My son has a 4 year old Giant Rincon, that model has now morphed into Giant's Yukon. The majority of the hardware on the bike is Alivio and it is just as good as it was when new taking into account normal wear and tear. To date one bit of his gear has failed.

    Talking to my local LBS guys, it is the gear like Alivio and Deore that handles the knocks because they are a heavier build and don't wear out as quickly as the top of the line light weight hardware.

    My young bloke Geoff, goes on long rough tracks, but he doesn't hit-up the features like you sound like you do. The only replacements he has made to his bike are better quality disks, because of hits from death cookies. The trails in the Blue Mountains, in eastern Australia, can be hard on bikes. Very few tracks here are called buff.

    All the best Mate.

    Warren.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Wassa
    Skep, I'm pleased that you smiled at the comparison my post was making.

    My son has a 4 year old Giant Rincon, that model has now morphed into Giant's Yukon. The majority of the hardware on the bike is Alivio and it is just as good as it was when new taking into account normal wear and tear. To date one bit of his gear has failed.

    Talking to my local LBS guys, it is the gear like Alivio and Deore that handles the knocks because they are a heavier build and don't wear out as quickly as the top of the line light weight hardware.

    My young bloke Geoff, goes on long rough tracks, but he doesn't hit-up the features like you sound like you do. The only replacements he has made to his bike are better quality disks, because of hits from death cookies. The trails in the Blue Mountains, in eastern Australia, can be hard on bikes. Very few tracks here are called buff.

    All the best Mate.

    Warren.
    Thanks for the first-hand review on the parts. I've straightened out my bent ring, but still wouldn't mind grabbing a new one.

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